I'm not sure if this is dumb or not?????

SmokySuitSmokySuit Posts: 429
Wail at the local cigar lounge enjoying a nice Graycliff Double Espresso from my trade with sdip (thanks man) I mentioned to a guy I was talking to that I was on a quest to collect and smoke the spiciest most peppery hot cigars in production. HE said that if I smoke any full bodied cigar really fast it will take on a peppery tone. Hitting my favorite cigars like a vacuum cleaner doesn’t sound like good advice. It there any truth to this?

Comments

  • xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    You're right; it IS a dumb question - now send me a few sticks for your penance or else ;)






    On-topic: Never heard this myself, so I don't know for sure, but I doubt it; the guy could be a moron, or someone with no palate, and mistake pepper for bitterness
  • YankeeManYankeeMan Posts: 2,114 ✭✭✭✭
    I thought Kuzi wrote something about this in the past. I seem to remember someone saying that if you did just that, smoke quickly, you would get more spice.

    Kuz, how say you?

  • DiamondogDiamondog Posts: 4,169
    SmokySuit:
    Wail at the local cigar lounge enjoying a nice Graycliff Double Espresso from my trade with sdip (thanks man) I mentioned to a guy I was talking to that I was on a quest to collect and smoke the spiciest most peppery hot cigars in production. HE said that if I smoke any full bodied cigar really fast it will take on a peppery tone. Hitting my favorite cigars like a vacuum cleaner doesn’t sound like good advice. It there any truth to this?
    Not good advice....the heat will ruin the cigar, to enjoy the cigar flavors to the fullest you want it to remain as cool as possible imo....you want something naturally spicey...
  • docedwardsdocedwards Posts: 319
    And if I eat spicey food faster it will taste spicier.
  • docbp87docbp87 Posts: 3,521
    Yeah, it might get spicier, but it will also overheat, turn bitter, burn improperly, and possibly even produce some of everyone's favorite tobacco sewage, tar.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭
    Diamondog:
    SmokySuit:
    Wail at the local cigar lounge enjoying a nice Graycliff Double Espresso from my trade with sdip (thanks man) I mentioned to a guy I was talking to that I was on a quest to collect and smoke the spiciest most peppery hot cigars in production. HE said that if I smoke any full bodied cigar really fast it will take on a peppery tone. Hitting my favorite cigars like a vacuum cleaner doesn’t sound like good advice. It there any truth to this?
    Not good advice....the heat will ruin the cigar, to enjoy the cigar flavors to the fullest you want it to remain as cool as possible imo....you want something naturally spicey...
    i agree with this
    YankeeMan:
    I thought Kuzi wrote something about this in the past. I seem to remember someone saying that if you did just that, smoke quickly, you would get more spice.

    Kuz, how say you?



    it will spice up a cigar if you smoke it faster. however, it will also bitter the cigar as well. so though you can get moer spice by smoking faster, the best way to get spice is to get a naturally spicy cigar.
    the post i wrote about this is in THIS thread.
    here is the quote:
    kuzi16:
    ive found that the slower you smoke the less pepper you have in a cigar.
    i find that nicaraguan tobacco tends to be a bit spicier than similar tobacco grown in other countries.
    i find that sun grown is a bit spicier than shade grown
    i find that higher priming leaves tend to be spicier than lower
    i find that Natural wrappers tend to be spicier than maduro or oscuro.
    corojo has more spice to it than many other strains


    so if you want spice, go with a nicaraguan natural sun-grown corojo wrapper with a fair amount of nicaraguan ligero filler and a nicaraguan binder.

    if you wanna back down the spice a bit, try maduro wrappers, honduran tobacco, shade grown tobacco, middle or lower primings, and less ligero.


    of course these are just rules of thumb.
    there are cigars out there that have things that would point to more spice but they are not.
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 4,314 ✭✭✭✭✭
    This question puts me in mind of Kuzi's comparison to cooking meat, from a different thread. The analogy might be a comparison to barbecue, say. If you cook barbecue nice and slow, adding sauces and spices as you go, you bring out certain flavors, and often end up with some charring. It's kind of like your friend is suggesting you just soak the meat in lighter fluid and let it blaze to produce this charring, not the same.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  
  • DSWarmackDSWarmack Posts: 1,426
    Note taken: I will no longer soak my cigars in lighter fluid and expect them to taste spicy, or have hair left!
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 4,314 ✭✭✭✭✭
    DSWarmack:
    Note taken: I will no longer soak my cigars in lighter fluid and expect them to taste spicy, or have hair left!
    lol. May not have been my best analogy, I probably shouldn't type anything 'til after my coffee, this has been my policy concerning speaking for many years. ;)
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  
  • DSWarmackDSWarmack Posts: 1,426
    I loved the analogy, I just couldn't pass up the opportunity!
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    ...
  • SmokySuitSmokySuit Posts: 429
    Lol thanks for the input everyone, I thought so.
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