dry boxing

bigharpoonbigharpoon Posts: 2,963 ✭✭✭
I've heard this mentioned many times but I'm still not sure what it means exactly. Is it a special type of box you put your cigar in, like an old cigar box without any humidifier? I'm just wondering what everyone actually uses for dry boxing and if there is any box conditioning involved. Thanks.

Comments

  • leonardleonard Posts: 359
    If I dry box a cigar, I use an old cigar box. Leave them in there for a day or two.
  • camgfscamgfs Posts: 968
    leonard:
    If I dry box a cigar, I use an old cigar box. Leave them in there for a day or two.
    +1 An old cigar box does the job nicely, as long as it has a good lid. Never leave your stick out on the counter, as it will dry out way too fast and could cause cracking or burn issues.

    In an ideal world, an unused humidor (20 count is perfect) does the best job. The idea is that certain cigars (Maduro wrapper, full bodied, high ligero leaf count) will burn better and possibly draw better when less humidified. Dry boxing for a day or 2 allows that cigar to slowly lose some of it's humidity.

    I do this for the 5 Vegas Relic, JR Ultimate Maduro and some of the Gurkha sticks like the Titan and Beast.

  • fla-gypsyfla-gypsy Posts: 3,024 ✭✭
    camgfs:
    leonard:
    If I dry box a cigar, I use an old cigar box. Leave them in there for a day or two.
    +1 An old cigar box does the job nicely, as long as it has a good lid. Never leave your stick out on the counter, as it will dry out way too fast and could cause cracking or burn issues.

    In an ideal world, an unused humidor (20 count is perfect) does the best job. The idea is that certain cigars (Maduro wrapper, full bodied, high ligero leaf count) will burn better and possibly draw better when less humidified. Dry boxing for a day or 2 allows that cigar to slowly lose some of it's humidity.

    I do this for the 5 Vegas Relic, JR Ultimate Maduro and some of the Gurkha sticks like the Titan and Beast.

    +2. I use a little 20 count humi I have on super oily fresh sticks.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭✭
    i just cant get into the dry boxing thing. ...especially putting them in a dry box for a day or two. the dry box will suck out all the moisture. i could see an hour or two, maybe three.
    isnt this why we season humidors instead of just throwing cigars in there right away?


    if you always seem to have burn issues, try keeping your humidor at 65%. this will fix 90% of issues.
    also try to not smoke cigars the moment they come in. i have a mandatory 6 week rest period for any cigars that are shipped in.

    i have to tell you, i cant remember the last time that i had a cigar that woudnt burn right or wouldnt stay lit.
  • KriegKrieg Posts: 5,092 ✭✭✭
    kuzi16:
    i just cant get into the dry boxing thing. ...especially putting them in a dry box for a day or two. the dry box will suck out all the moisture. i could see an hour or two, maybe three.
    isnt this why we season humidors instead of just throwing cigars in there right away?


    if you always seem to have burn issues, try keeping your humidor at 65%. this will fix 90% of issues.
    also try to not smoke cigars the moment they come in. i have a mandatory 6 week rest period for any cigars that are shipped in.

    i have to tell you, i cant remember the last time that i had a cigar that woudnt burn right or wouldnt stay lit.
    I would agree with this too, I have never dry boxed a cigar just from the fact that I like smoking my cigars when they're fresh...not dried out. I also keep my humi between 65-68% RH and never had a problem.
  • camgfscamgfs Posts: 968
    I don't call a cigar that's been dry boxed a "dried out" cigar. Without sun or wind or airflow, the humidity in a cigar will not "dry up" in a day or 2. Dry boxing is not something I made up...the idea has been around for a long time. My humidor is also around 65% as much as possible.

    If your sticks are smoking perfect the way they are, then by all means, leave them in the Humi until you are ready to light up. If you have burn issues with some sticks, try "dry boxing" and see if it helps. Just like keeping the cello on or off, it's personal choice, according to how your sticks are performing.

  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭✭
    i mean
    i guess whatever works.

  • xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    kuzi16:
    i just cant get into the dry boxing thing. ...especially putting them in a dry box for a day or two. the dry box will suck out all the moisture. i could see an hour or two, maybe three.
    isnt this why we season humidors instead of just throwing cigars in there right away?


    if you always seem to have burn issues, try keeping your humidor at 65%. this will fix 90% of issues.
    also try to not smoke cigars the moment they come in. i have a mandatory 6 week rest period for any cigars that are shipped in.

    i have to tell you, i cant remember the last time that i had a cigar that woudnt burn right or wouldnt stay lit.
    +1. If I ever get an overly humidified cigar, I toss it in my humi with the rest of my collection - the extra humidity will even out with time and be absorbed by my beads
  • camgfscamgfs Posts: 968
    There seems to be a "missunderstanding" of sorts about dry boxing. It is not an attempt to dry out an over-humidified stick.
    Some cigars, like the 5 Vegas Relic and many Cubans are very "oily", and those natural oils will act as humidity when heated. This can cause burn issues and cracking/splitting from time to time.
    Dry boxing is an attempt to balance this effect, and not meant to dry out the cigar because of any humidification problems.

    I sure hope that this explains it better than I have been able to in the past.

    Sorry if I have not explained this any better before now.
  • bigharpoonbigharpoon Posts: 2,963 ✭✭✭
    Thanks for the discussion everyone. Whether you're for it or against it, it seems pretty straight forward. This morning I ordered a triple pack of Punch gran puro that comes in a nice leather case. This seems like a good little unit to have on hand and can do double duty as a dry boxer when I want to give it a try. Thanks for all your help, as always.
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 4,629 ✭✭✭✭✭
    camgfs:
    There seems to be a "missunderstanding" of sorts about dry boxing. It is not an attempt to dry out an over-humidified stick.
    Some cigars, like the 5 Vegas Relic and many Cubans are very "oily", and those natural oils will act as humidity when heated. This can cause burn issues and cracking/splitting from time to time.
    Dry boxing is an attempt to balance this effect, and not meant to dry out the cigar because of any humidification problems.

    I sure hope that this explains it better than I have been able to in the past.

    Sorry if I have not explained this any better before now.
    well, I had never heard of this until lately, but I tried it on 5 Vegas Relic, and, voila! very satisfactory. I'm a happy guy.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  
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