Different cigar rolling techniques - any old-fashioned ones out there?

xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
I was poking around the net, and found that there are 2 ways to roll a cigar. The first, and more recent/efficient way, is to just lay the leaves on top of one another, and roll the entire thing at once. The older method, is to roll each individual leaf, then combine them together, so that the entire cigar is a series of tubes - it seems this has the effect of producing a slower-burning cigar that lasts longer.

I went through my humi, and it doesn't seem any of them were rolled using this older method, so my question to the more knowledgeable BOTL's here is, are there any cigars rolled this way? Does it really produce any difference? Are there any other rolling techniques?

Comments

  • My local shop owner does it the old way, but I wouldn't really call it "tubes". He more or less "bunches" each individual leaf up before he puts it with the other filler leaves and applies the binder. Doing it this way permits the removal of the tough center ribs and larger veins from each leaf before it's rolled, making a better-feeling and smoother-drawing cigar. I've never smoked one of his that had a tough draw, all of his sticks have been a very pleasurable experience.

    As far as cigars that are available to the masses, Padron is the only company that might do it this way. I can't think of how you'd really be able to tell if they were or not short of dissecting one or actually watching them bunch the filler.

  • j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403
    Actually, unless I'm way off, I think most cigar rollers use the entubado style of rolling, that would be the individual bunching of each leaf. I don't know what the other method is known as, so I'm going to call it the pancake method. If what I recall is correct, the pancake method isn't really used anymore by reputable manufacturers because the burn and draw are less reliable, and surely for other reasons as well. Someone correct me if I have my info wrong, I do have a tendency to make things up as I go sometimes.
  • PsychoSJGPsychoSJG Posts: 743 ✭✭
    Entubado bunching is the original style used in Cuba to roll cigars. The process involves rolling each leaf “en tubo style,” or in a tube shape similar to a straw. The tobaccos are then combined, creating a cylinder shape consisting of smaller tubes of tobacco on the inside, which are then concealed by a binder and wrapper. Creating cigars using this style allows for a cool, slow and even burn in addition to supremely consistent construction and flavor.

    On the other hand, accordion bunching is a method practiced outside of Cuba in Central America and around the Caribbean and focuses on bunching the tobacco leaves in a fashion similar to an authentic Japanese hand fan. This method takes less time to roll and can be correctly accomplished by less experienced torcedors, which is why it is utilized more often than the traditional tubar style of bunching. Accordion bunching also allows for the use of a liberman, a tool used to roll up the filler with the binder, which saves a lot of time and usually maintains consistency in draw and construction from stick to stick.
  • xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    PsychoSJG:
    Entubado bunching is the original style used in Cuba to roll cigars. The process involves rolling each leaf “en tubo style,” or in a tube shape similar to a straw. The tobaccos are then combined, creating a cylinder shape consisting of smaller tubes of tobacco on the inside, which are then concealed by a binder and wrapper. Creating cigars using this style allows for a cool, slow and even burn in addition to supremely consistent construction and flavor.

    On the other hand, accordion bunching is a method practiced outside of Cuba in Central America and around the Caribbean and focuses on bunching the tobacco leaves in a fashion similar to an authentic Japanese hand fan. This method takes less time to roll and can be correctly accomplished by less experienced torcedors, which is why it is utilized more often than the traditional tubar style of bunching. Accordion bunching also allows for the use of a liberman, a tool used to roll up the filler with the binder, which saves a lot of time and usually maintains consistency in draw and construction from stick to stick.
    Not sure where you got that, but I'm pretty sure that's exactly what I read when I went looking a few months ago. Nice find!

  • PsychoSJGPsychoSJG Posts: 743 ✭✭
    xmacro:
    PsychoSJG:
    Entubado bunching is the original style used in Cuba to roll cigars. The process involves rolling each leaf “en tubo style,” or in a tube shape similar to a straw. The tobaccos are then combined, creating a cylinder shape consisting of smaller tubes of tobacco on the inside, which are then concealed by a binder and wrapper. Creating cigars using this style allows for a cool, slow and even burn in addition to supremely consistent construction and flavor.

    On the other hand, accordion bunching is a method practiced outside of Cuba in Central America and around the Caribbean and focuses on bunching the tobacco leaves in a fashion similar to an authentic Japanese hand fan. This method takes less time to roll and can be correctly accomplished by less experienced torcedors, which is why it is utilized more often than the traditional tubar style of bunching. Accordion bunching also allows for the use of a liberman, a tool used to roll up the filler with the binder, which saves a lot of time and usually maintains consistency in draw and construction from stick to stick.
    Not sure where you got that, but I'm pretty sure that's exactly what I read when I went looking a few months ago. Nice find!


    Oct 6th edition of the CCOM newsletter
  • KriegKrieg Posts: 5,083 ✭✭✭
    I know the new RP (15th Anniv) is rolled via the old Cuban Tubo method. The robusto is a good 1.5hrs. I am a huge fan of this method since it helps make the cigar last longer and help keeps it cooler.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭
    i dont have a list of brands that roll like this though i know i have seen several mention that they do.
    in VERY general terms, the more cigars that a company makes, the less likely it is that Entubado Bunching is used. this is a very slow and complex way to roll cigars. if you are trying to pump out the maximum amount of cigars, you are using the Accordion Bunching method (the next fastest) or the Book Bunching method (the fastest and most widely used). the accordion bunching method is exactly as it sounds. each leaf is bunched like an accordion then rolled into the binder. the book bunching method involves laying filler leaves flatly on top of one another and then folding them up, like a book to complete the bunch. the book method is quick and easy but creates a less aerated cigar structure. this could result in a tight draw and uneven burns.
  • Stryker808Stryker808 Posts: 269
    There is the Berger & Argenti Entubo cigars that are rolled and named after this style. Not sure if there is a difference between what you are talking about and they style they roll them with, except for the little tube that sticks out at the foot, which to me is just a sales gimmick. The B&A entubo quad maduro is good smoke though, but a little overpriced.
  • xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    He's baaaaaack . . . .
  • RaschNutsRaschNuts Posts: 882
    xmacro:
    He's baaaaaack . . . .
    This is one instance im glad we got spammed. I never saw this thread before.
  • JCizzleJCizzle NYCPosts: 1,912 ✭✭
    Have you guys smoked a cigar right after it was rolled? Was it good?
    Light 'em up.
  • gmill880gmill880 Posts: 5,947
    I smoked one hand rolled at a Toyota event in the Cayman Islands , actually I smoked 2 , one right then and one the next day. It was supposedly cuban tobacco , although I don't know anything about the blend as the event was crouded and one-on-one time with the roller was impossible. The cigars were very very tasty and best of all everything to do with the trip was paid for by Toyota !!!
  • xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    JCizzle:
    Have you guys smoked a cigar right after it was rolled? Was it good?
    Supposedly freshly-rolled cigars have a "chicles" taste, whatever that is; some like it, some hate it. I think CI sells some freshly rolled Perdomo wheels of 50.
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