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Thank a service member!

This morning at the bagel place, I had the privilege of being able to shake hands with and thank for their service 3 very young Marines in full dress uniform. I truly hope it made their day... it really started mine out well!

Thank a service member next time you see you! They really do appreciate it :)


(I also do this with firemen!)

Comments

  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,633 ✭✭✭✭
    NYHCx516x:
    This morning at the bagel place, I had the privilege of being able to shake hands with and thank for their service 3 very young Marines in full dress uniform. I truly hope it made their day... it really started mine out well!

    Thank a service member next time you see you! They really do appreciate it :)


    (I also do this with firemen!)
    every time a fireman, a police man, or anyone in any branch of the military comes into my restaurant in uniform, i make sure they get three things: great service, a discount, and a firm handshake.
  • gmill880gmill880 Posts: 5,947
    Did this Thursday to a young man just back from Iraq .
  • NYHCx516x:
    This morning at the bagel place, I had the privilege of being able to shake hands with and thank for their service 3 very young Marines in full dress uniform. I truly hope it made their day... it really started mine out well!

    Thank a service member next time you see you! They really do appreciate it :)


    (I also do this with firemen!)


    Right on! I don't think we can thank our military, police, and firemen enough - especially in this day and age. I also go out of my way to talk to any WWII vets that I see as they are all disappearing rapidly as they reach their 80's and beyond.


  • The SniperThe Sniper Posts: 3,910
    Thanks JetMech & ejenne!!!

  • minibeezyminibeezy Posts: 257
    I thank anyone in uniform every chance I get. I heard an idea, and I have yet to be in the situation, but the next time I'm in a restaurant and I see someone in uniform, I'm going to try to track down the waitress and pay their tab (within reason, of course), with the understanding that the waitress is to tell them their bill has been taken care of by a thankful citizen. Not looking for any thanks in return. Just looking to put a smile on a soldier's face and show some appreciation.
  • YankeeManYankeeMan Posts: 2,502 ✭✭✭✭✭
    minibeezy:
    I thank anyone in uniform every chance I get. I heard an idea, and I have yet to be in the situation, but the next time I'm in a restaurant and I see someone in uniform, I'm going to try to track down the waitress and pay their tab (within reason, of course), with the understanding that the waitress is to tell them their bill has been taken care of by a thankful citizen. Not looking for any thanks in return. Just looking to put a smile on a soldier's face and show some appreciation.
    My son, who is in the 82nd Airborne, was at a restaurant in Atlanta Airport with two of his Army buddies and someone did exactly that. It was very much appreciated!

    I live in Ithaca, which is sort of Berkely east, so whenever I see someone in the Military or a veteran, I always thank them for their service, they always seemed surprised, but thankful.
  • PuroFreakPuroFreak Posts: 4,131 ✭✭
    My neighbor across the street just returned from his fourth deployment. Last weekend I had him over for a beer just to say thank you. Can't express how thankful I am for our military men and women.
  • The SniperThe Sniper Posts: 3,910
    Cant do it as often as Id like, but every once in a while when I see a military member in a restaurant I like to take their waitress aside and pick up their tab as Im leaving the restaurant. I never say a word to the military member, and I ask the waitress to A) not tell them until they're done eating, and B) simply tell them that it was from someone who appreciates the sacrifices they make.

    Good thing to do for great people, and it saves the service member the awkwardness of the scene. Was always an uncomfortable thing for me when I was serving and people would thank me for my service...

  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 6,268 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I've been with my son when people ask him if he lost his arm in Iraq, he says "No, Afghanistan". I can tell it makes him a little self-conscious, but I can also tell it makes him feel a little better, affirms that he made the right decisions, and that freedom is worth fighting for. I try to pass this on in my own profession as well, when I'm working ER firemen, policemen, sheriff deputies etc., as well as soldiers know that I appreciate their efforts. It's the least we can do.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as another person's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • NYHCx516xNYHCx516x Posts: 728
    Amos Umwhat:
    I've been with my son when people ask him if he lost his arm in Iraq, he says "No, Afghanistan". I can tell it makes him a little self-conscious, but I can also tell it makes him feel a little better, affirms that he made the right decisions, and that freedom is worth fighting for. I try to pass this on in my own profession as well, when I'm working ER firemen, policemen, sheriff deputies etc., as well as soldiers know that I appreciate their efforts. It's the least we can do.
    I dont really have any words that can put my thoughts into voice. My hat is off to your son, and we are all in his debt.
  • PuroFreakPuroFreak Posts: 4,131 ✭✭
    NYHCx516x:
    Amos Umwhat:
    I've been with my son when people ask him if he lost his arm in Iraq, he says "No, Afghanistan". I can tell it makes him a little self-conscious, but I can also tell it makes him feel a little better, affirms that he made the right decisions, and that freedom is worth fighting for. I try to pass this on in my own profession as well, when I'm working ER firemen, policemen, sheriff deputies etc., as well as soldiers know that I appreciate their efforts. It's the least we can do.
    I dont really have any words that can put my thoughts into voice. My hat is off to your son, and we are all in his debt.
    +1 to this!
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 6,268 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thanks, guys. Fact is, he's doing great, and I think a lot of his mental/emotional recovery was exactly due to peoples expressions of appreciation, it really means something to the guys. On that note, I also must thank the Fisher House people for taking care of the soldiers families, they were fantastic.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as another person's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • YankeeManYankeeMan Posts: 2,502 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Please thank your son for me and my family will keep him in our prayers.
  • DSWarmackDSWarmack Posts: 1,426
    Little known fact: Soldiers get nervous too.
    We are educated from basic training that what we do is an awesome sacrifice. Most of us never have to understand the sacrifice like your son, and my hat is off to him. Some people join for the college money and think they will never see combat, some people join because it’s the only thing they think they can do, and there are a ton more reasons.
    I am asked all the time if I served in IRQ. I say yes and that it was a long time ago. I am almost ALWAYS thanked for my service! Because I have been doing this for 10 years I have come up with a 'standard defensive response' for these accolades. I tell them that their, 'appreciation is why we do it, it’s surely not for the paycheck'.
    I am almost 30 with all kinds of cool training, a steady income (even though it is a small income, steady is more important to me), and the heartfelt thanks of a nation behind me. The reason I bring this up is because sometimes soldiers get stuck, and/or uncomfortable when being told thanks. I am by no means saying not to do it; again this is exactly why a lot of men and women do it in the first place. I am merely saying that if a soldier seems like they are put on the spot by a gratuitous statement don’t be put off by it. They appreciate what you've said, put yourself in their shoes.
    Tons of people may have said the same things to them that day but your voice brings back a memory of a friend that has long been gone (try explaining to someone that you are not crying over their statement but the loss of a buddy six years ago without making them feel bad).
    I guess I am just saying to remember that while you may think they are super human for their accomplishments, and a lot of them have done some very heroic things, they think of themselves as normal everyday people. I for one think all firefighters are crazy... I'm not running into a burning building, but a firefight is business as usual.

    We appreciate your thanks! Keep up the good support of your troops. Amos, tell your son that I personally appreciate his sacrifice for his county. He is the epitome of someone that has given more than his fair share. Sorry for the disertation.
  • skweekzskweekz PAPosts: 2,279 ✭✭✭
    DSWarmack:
    Little known fact: Soldiers get nervous too.
    We are educated from basic training that what we do is an awesome sacrifice. Most of us never have to understand the sacrifice like your son, and my hat is off to him. Some people join for the college money and think they will never see combat, some people join because it’s the only thing they think they can do, and there are a ton more reasons.
    I am asked all the time if I served in IRQ. I say yes and that it was a long time ago. I am almost ALWAYS thanked for my service! Because I have been doing this for 10 years I have come up with a 'standard defensive response' for these accolades. I tell them that their, 'appreciation is why we do it, it’s surely not for the paycheck'.
    I am almost 30 with all kinds of cool training, a steady income (even though it is a small income, steady is more important to me), and the heartfelt thanks of a nation behind me. The reason I bring this up is because sometimes soldiers get stuck, and/or uncomfortable when being told thanks. I am by no means saying not to do it; again this is exactly why a lot of men and women do it in the first place. I am merely saying that if a soldier seems like they are put on the spot by a gratuitous statement don’t be put off by it. They appreciate what you've said, put yourself in their shoes.
    Tons of people may have said the same things to them that day but your voice brings back a memory of a friend that has long been gone (try explaining to someone that you are not crying over their statement but the loss of a buddy six years ago without making them feel bad).
    I guess I am just saying to remember that while you may think they are super human for their accomplishments, and a lot of them have done some very heroic things, they think of themselves as normal everyday people. I for one think all firefighters are crazy... I'm not running into a burning building, but a firefight is business as usual.

    We appreciate your thanks! Keep up the good support of your troops. Amos, tell your son that I personally appreciate his sacrifice for his county. He is the epitome of someone that has given more than his fair share. Sorry for the disertation.


    +1...I agree entirely. Very well put
  • DSWarmackDSWarmack Posts: 1,426
    I thought it went a little long but its a tough point to convey to people.
  • YankeeManYankeeMan Posts: 2,502 ✭✭✭✭✭
    You said it very well and it's something I will keep in mind when I'm thanking a service member. Thank you for serving.
  • DSWarmackDSWarmack Posts: 1,426
    I couldnt give it up if I tried... and trust me I have tried. It is where I belong, and I am constantly told that from my parents, wife, kids, friends, everyone. I love what I do! and there aren't many people anymore who can say that. I will get out when the make me or bury me. It is a lifestyle choice, one that I have never regreted. There have been hard times, I've missed more anniversaries and births (and birthdays) of my own children than I've made it to, I've cursed the people in my chain of command more than I've praised them. But you know what? If I trained one soldier so that he can stay alive or keep his buddy alive; if I've gotten one recruit out of a crappy little town that had nowhere for him to end up but prison and gotten them a college education and some life experience; if I've helped to keep this country safe.... It's all been worth it, and trust me gentelmen when I say, 'It's been more than worth it!'
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 6,268 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Astounding, isn't it? It's your calling. I know that the time I spent in service myself was so much more than just a "job", it's a way of life. Thank you for answering your call. May God be with you.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as another person's bad habits."   Mark Twain
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