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Tupperdor question

I was searching the forum for information on making a tupperdor. I saw that the guys using coolidors say to get a cooler with a good seal, but the tupperdor guys say not to put the lid on tight because you need air circulation. I'm confused. I have ordered some beads which should prevent over humidification, right? I appreciate any information that i can get. I only have 30 sticks or so, but don't want them ruined. My humidor was overful and unable to keep up. I bought a rubbermaid tupperware tub that should hold 100 sticks or so.

Comments

  • j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403
    Tupperware seals so tight that over-humidification is a very real possibility even with beads. It's ok to put the lid on, but watch the humidity and try to take the lid off once a week or so to get some air circulation going on. If the humidity sits too high, try discharging your beads most of the way.
  • docbp87docbp87 Posts: 3,521
    Gotta make sure to "burp" it regularly.
  • xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    In addition to over-humidification, there's another reason to open the lid on a coolder/tupperdor but not on a wooden humidor - ammonia. As cigars age, especially if they're young, they give off ammonia (you can taste it as a "chemical" taste if you smoke a young cigar) - opening the lid (only need to do it once or twice a month) allows the ammonia to escape so it doesn't bother your other cigars. Wooden humidors are not airtight, so excess humidity and ammonia can escape on their own.

  • great, thanks guys. I have the tupperdor filled. I love how much space I now have. Now I need more cigars!
  • bigharpoonbigharpoon Posts: 2,963 ✭✭✭
    bigjohn125:
    great, thanks guys. I have the tupperdor filled. I love how much space I now have. Now I need more cigars!
    Enjoy it while you can, now my tupperdor is freakin' full. I think I'm going to go cooler but I really like the see-through top so I can read the hygro without opening the lid.
  • shamrockedshamrocked Posts: 285
    So I'm actually thinking about making a tupperdor to help with a box order I'm planning on making - Do you just wash out the tupperware first and then drop the sticks in with some beads or is there an actual seasoning process that I need to perform?
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,634 ✭✭✭✭
    j0z3r:
    Tupperware seals so tight that over-humidification is a very real possibility even with beads. It's ok to put the lid on, but watch the humidity and try to take the lid off once a week or so to get some air circulation going on. If the humidity sits too high, try discharging your beads most of the way.
    exactly.
    intermittent air exchange promotes healthy age.

    if that is your humidor, and you smoke one or two times a week then you should be fine. the opening of that to get your smokes out is air exchange enough.
  • bigjohn125bigjohn125 Posts: 476
    Thanks. Thats what I've been doing and the humidity is holding very nicely. I was getting pretty worried about my sticks in my humidor, but in the tupperdor I feel a lot better. Plus, I have way more room, and I can use the money I saved buying this instead of a new humi, I can buy more cigars. Can't wait for some deals!
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,219 ✭✭✭
    shamrocked:
    So I'm actually thinking about making a tupperdor to help with a box order I'm planning on making - Do you just wash out the tupperware first and then drop the sticks in with some beads or is there an actual seasoning process that I need to perform?
    Personally with any tupperdor/coolerdor, etc I always wipe the whole thing out with distilled water. I then stuff it full of newspaper and let it sit for at least 24 hours. I then wipe it out again, put some humidification in there and assuming my sticks are coming from another humidified source I toss them right in. If your sticks are coming from a bag or somewhere that they could be slightly under humidifed I'd give the humidification a little while to "season" the new tupperdor before I throw the sticks in.
  • shamrockedshamrocked Posts: 285
    madurofan:
    shamrocked:
    So I'm actually thinking about making a tupperdor to help with a box order I'm planning on making - Do you just wash out the tupperware first and then drop the sticks in with some beads or is there an actual seasoning process that I need to perform?
    Personally with any tupperdor/coolerdor, etc I always wipe the whole thing out with distilled water. I then stuff it full of newspaper and let it sit for at least 24 hours. I then wipe it out again, put some humidification in there and assuming my sticks are coming from another humidified source I toss them right in. If your sticks are coming from a bag or somewhere that they could be slightly under humidifed I'd give the humidification a little while to "season" the new tupperdor before I throw the sticks in.


    Thanks for the tip. I was just curious after reading numerous coolidor posts. I have the perfect tupperware piece in mind. Now just time to clean it out and order my box :)
  • bigjohn125bigjohn125 Posts: 476
    Just to update, the tupperdor is working better than expected. The humidity is holding perfectly and my sticks are in great shape. I'm glad I went this route instead of spending the money on a new humidor. I would recomend this to anyone.
  • RCY_CigarsRCY_Cigars Posts: 5,492 ✭✭✭
    madurofan:
    shamrocked:
    So I'm actually thinking about making a tupperdor to help with a box order I'm planning on making - Do you just wash out the tupperware first and then drop the sticks in with some beads or is there an actual seasoning process that I need to perform?
    Personally with any tupperdor/coolerdor, etc I always wipe the whole thing out with distilled water. I then stuff it full of newspaper and let it sit for at least 24 hours. I then wipe it out again, put some humidification in there and assuming my sticks are coming from another humidified source I toss them right in. If your sticks are coming from a bag or somewhere that they could be slightly under humidifed I'd give the humidification a little while to "season" the new tupperdor before I throw the sticks in.


    I resently went this route and it is working out great. Question I have, will these age in a tupperdor if I leave them in the cedar box. Hence the picture...

    Photobucket
  • RCY_CigarsRCY_Cigars Posts: 5,492 ✭✭✭
    Noobie mistake wrong pic, lol. Here it is...

    Photobucket
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    I'm having trouble with the whole "Tupperware" concept. While it is true that you have complete control over the relative humidity, you totally lose any air migration. Snap, its's shut. No air movement. At least the cedar breathes moisture in and out. One of the recent posts or links mentioned that the tobacco exchanged its flavors as the humidity changed. What would be the outcome of a cigar, totally sealed and aged in perfect humidity, yet no air movement or exchange. Compared to one in a well used humidor of the same age?. I understand that you pop the lid from time to time to add and subtract, but how much new air vs old air is there. I think a cigar should breathe fresh, moisture laden air in a breathable humidor. I want to see the moisture and temperature fluctuate in minor amounts. I think the seasonal changes are good for aging and smoking. My psuedo-scientific mind tells me that I would want the stick to age in a relative high temp and humidity, and smoke it when it has dried a bit. I keep about 75 cigars in a 100 ct humidor, without wrappers. I rotate occasionally, and am very careful. The southern humidity often requires the use of the gel or beads to suck moisture out of the box, but drying out is not much of a problem.. .Questions?, I only ask them. . "I may be totally wrong, but I'm a Dancing Fool!" Frank Zappa/
  • RCY_CigarsRCY_Cigars Posts: 5,492 ✭✭✭
    beatnic:
    I'm having trouble with the whole "Tupperware" concept. While it is true that you have complete control over the relative humidity, you totally lose any air migration. Snap, its's shut. No air movement. At least the cedar breathes moisture in and out. One of the recent posts or links mentioned that the tobacco exchanged its flavors as the humidity changed. What would be the outcome of a cigar, totally sealed and aged in perfect humidity, yet no air movement or exchange. Compared to one in a well used humidor of the same age?. I understand that you pop the lid from time to time to add and subtract, but how much new air vs old air is there. I think a cigar should breathe fresh, moisture laden air in a breathable humidor. I want to see the moisture and temperature fluctuate in minor amounts. I think the seasonal changes are good for aging and smoking. My psuedo-scientific mind tells me that I would want the stick to age in a relative high temp and humidity, and smoke it when it has dried a bit. I keep about 75 cigars in a 100 ct humidor, without wrappers. I rotate occasionally, and am very careful. The southern humidity often requires the use of the gel or beads to suck moisture out of the box, but drying out is not much of a problem.. .Questions?, I only ask them. . "I may be totally wrong, but I'm a Dancing Fool!" Frank Zappa/


    So basically, if anything this would be a temporary thing. Nothing long term. I really want a cabinet now...
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    Don't take my word, RCY. I'm still asking questions myself. Like. Does a Cuban cigar taste the same in Cuba as it would in Alaska? And, has the coffee roasting plant next door me de-sensitized my ability to taste mocha in a Cohiba?. My all time favorite way to keep cigars from getting too dry or wet? Smoke em fast.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,634 ✭✭✭✭
    there are already "micro-examples" of what we are discussing here. this micro-example is a tubo. in a "properly stored" tubo* there is almost no air exchange. the cigar in that tube will not "go bad" in there. no company would put their product in a container that when used correctly would ruin the product.

    the only thing that this lack of air exchange will do to a cigar will be to slow down the aging of the cigar.
    again, if you open the tupperware up once or twice a week to get a cigar to smoke like most of us do, this should be enough air exchange to counter the near perfect seal on the tupperware.




    *opinions vary on this matter but what i consider "proper" for this thread is a tube that has never been opened and for the most part has a good seal on it. no air circulation.
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    kuzi16:
    there are already "micro-examples" of what we are discussing here. this micro-example is a tubo. in a "properly stored" tubo* there is almost no air exchange. the cigar in that tube will not "go bad" in there. no company would put their product in a container that when used correctly would ruin the product.

    the only thing that this lack of air exchange will do to a cigar will be to slow down the aging of the cigar.
    again, if you open the tupperware up once or twice a week to get a cigar to smoke like most of us do, this should be enough air exchange to counter the near perfect seal on the tupperware.




    *opinions vary on this matter but what i consider "proper" for this thread is a tube that has never been opened and for the most part has a good seal on it. no air circulation.
    My mother used to tell me to use "proper" manners.
    Question. If there is no, or little, exchange of air, do you even need to keep them in a humidor? You've set the moisture content by sealing it. Can't you just store it in a temperature controlled area to keep the relative humidity where you want it?
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,634 ✭✭✭✭
    beatnic:
    If there is no, or little, exchange of air, do you even need to keep them in a humidor? You've set the moisture content by sealing it. Can't you just store it in a temperature controlled area to keep the relative humidity where you want it?
    in theory you dont need a humidor. in practice, you do.

    in theory the tubo is sealed tight and nothing gets in and nothing gets out. in reality, there are very few things that are 100% air/moisture tight. i doubt that a tubo is. i would say that a tubo will "survive" longer in less than ideal conditions than a cigar only in cellophane, but i wouldnt leave them out of the humidor with the thoughts that it will be ok because it is in a tube.

    air circulation and exchange is a bit different than moisture loss. if you put a tube with a cigar in it into a dry wind tunnel the air inside the tube will not move but through osmosis moisture would be lost. osmosis through the imperfections in the seal, not through the tube itself.

    in short, cigars in tubes should be kept in a well maintained humidor for the added protection.
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    I'm just thinking that, although sticking a cigar in an air tight environment might help it keep and stay fresh much longer, it doesn't necessarily mean that the cigar is "aging". Its definitely not blending with other cigars or cedar. Or if it is, very slowly. You could draw a pseudo-parallel to wine. Once you put the cork in the bottle it's done aging, no matter how long you keep it.

    Now, I don't necessarily need to "age" my cigars. I do like to keep several dozen ready-to-smoke premiums in my humidor, resting next to other cigars, being circulated with a mixture of flavors, aromas and fresh, moist air. I keep them without wrappers and separated with slats. Older and better on bottom. Now, this is just my approach to enjoying cigars. And let it be said clearly, I do the above to be able to enjoy smoking a good cigar when ever I want. I am not a collector of sticks.
    I'll challenge you Kuzi. Who has the better smelling container? My seasoned humidor, or your tupperware. LOL
  • RCY_CigarsRCY_Cigars Posts: 5,492 ✭✭✭
    beatnic:
    I'm just thinking that, although sticking a cigar in an air tight environment might help it keep and stay fresh much longer, it doesn't necessarily mean that the cigar is "aging". Its definitely not blending with other cigars or cedar. Or if it is, very slowly. You could draw a pseudo-parallel to wine. Once you put the cork in the bottle it's done aging, no matter how long you keep it.

    Now, I don't necessarily need to "age" my cigars. I do like to keep several dozen ready-to-smoke premiums in my humidor, resting next to other cigars, being circulated with a mixture of flavors, aromas and fresh, moist air. I keep them without wrappers and separated with slats. Older and better on bottom. Now, this is just my approach to enjoying cigars. And let it be said clearly, I do the above to be able to enjoy smoking a good cigar when ever I want. I am not a collector of sticks.
    I'll challenge you Kuzi. Who has the better smelling container? My seasoned humidor, or your tupperware. LOL


    Beatnic, that was my initial question that started this. Quote "Question I have, will these age in a tupperdor if I leave them in the cedar box. Hence the picture..." I only want to keep my cigars that are in boxes in there, cedar boxes. That's why I showed the picture. It really doesn't matter that much, this is only a temporary fix for me. Four maybe three months, then I'll be back in the states. And I can purchase a cabinet. No big deal...
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    RCY Cigars:
    beatnic:
    I'm just thinking tha...... seasoned humidor, or your tupperware. LOL


    Beatnic, that was my initial question that started this. Quote "Question I have, will these age in a tupperdor if I leave them in the cedar box. Hence the picture..." I only want to keep my cigars that are in boxes in there, cedar boxes. That's why I showed the picture. It really doesn't matter that much, this is only a temporary fix for me. Four maybe three months, then I'll be back in the states. And I can purchase a cabinet. No big deal...
    By all means. Yes, leave them in the tupperware while trying to extend the length of the stick. I'm not doubting the wisdom here. I'm just trying to wrap my mind, which came packaged with preconceived notions, around the issue enough to suit my needs. Language stuff (storing vs aging?). Also, I'm just damn curious about these things and enjoy thoughtful discussion.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,634 ✭✭✭✭
    beatnic:
    I'm just thinking that, although sticking a cigar in an air tight environment might help it keep and stay fresh much longer, it doesn't necessarily mean that the cigar is "aging". Its definitely not blending with other cigars or cedar. Or if it is, very slowly. You could draw a pseudo-parallel to wine. Once you put the cork in the bottle it's done aging, no matter how long you keep it.

    Now, I don't necessarily need to "age" my cigars. I do like to keep several dozen ready-to-smoke premiums in my humidor, resting next to other cigars, being circulated with a mixture of flavors, aromas and fresh, moist air. I keep them without wrappers and separated with slats. Older and better on bottom. Now, this is just my approach to enjoying cigars. And let it be said clearly, I do the above to be able to enjoy smoking a good cigar when ever I want. I am not a collector of sticks.
    I'll challenge you Kuzi. Who has the better smelling container? My seasoned humidor, or your tupperware. LOL
    i have two humidors and one tupperware. all of them smell the same. of course my tupperware is opened on the regular, and it is cedar lined.

    and of course i was speaking hypothetically because that is how the question was posed.
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,219 ✭✭✭
    We can beat this subject to death. The absolute truth of the matter is if you truly want to AGE cigars you need a much better environment than a tupperdor or coolerdor. True aging needs to be done in a climate and humidity controlled environment with plenty of RAW spanish cedar to help with mold and humidity control.

    Coolerdors, tupperdors, even desktop humidors are for storage not for "aging". Sure cigars will rest well in there and they will age to some degree in any storage that is properly maintained. But lets all quit pretending that we are trully aging our cigars, we're letting them rest for a short amount of time only because we have more cigars than we can smoke anyways.

    If you're name is not Matt Kuzinicki(sp?) and you plan on keeping a cigar for more than a year or so start looking into better storage methods for aging. Otherwise just shut up, find a container that holds humidity, throw some cedar and sticks in there and smoke away.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,634 ✭✭✭✭
    ha!

    am i the only freak that buys cigars with the intent to age?


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