Dry Boxing

robbyrasrobbyras Posts: 5,487
So I've seen this mentioned before... I'm pretty sure I know what it is, but can someone give me a breakdown of what it entails and why it needs to be done?
«1

Comments

  • The_KidThe_Kid Posts: 7,871 ✭✭✭
    In my opinion this is what one does and this is what I do and why I do it. Dry Boxing is mainly done to dry out the cigar, Some wrappers /cigars benefit from this. As they are either moist to begin or smoke better at a lower Rh, lets say 60 rather than 70. Some wrappers just do not burn as well as others, corojo comes to mind, so this drying out period will aid in a better burning cigar. For some cigars the draw may not be too good, after cliping my cigar I do a predraw or a drawbefore lighting and can usually get an idea of how the cigar will draw once lit. If the draw seems to be tighter than I like I will then throw the cigar in a drybox (empty cigar box or unhumidified humidor) and let it rest for a day or two, Ive let em sit for up to 5 days before. But usually just a day or two is sufficient. Sometimes this will improve the draw sometimes not. Other times this is done for certain cigars with known wrapper burn issues. Hope this helps, Id like to hear what others have to say too.
  • robbyrasrobbyras Posts: 5,487
    interesting... so, yesterday I had an EP Carrillo corona and the draw was really tight... so dry boxing it in an non-humidified cedar box for a few days could remedy that? I really had no idea...
  • The SniperThe Sniper Posts: 3,910
    Ive heard it does wonders for the flavor and burn of particularly oily cigars. Gran Habano Vintage 2002's come to mind.

  • The_KidThe_Kid Posts: 7,871 ✭✭✭
    The Sniper:
    Ive heard it does wonders for the flavor and burn of particularly oily cigars. Gran Habano Vintage 2002's come to mind.

    Yep thats one that I drybox often
  • fla-gypsyfla-gypsy Posts: 3,024 ✭✭
    I have used that technique quite effectively. Cigars are much more resilient that most people expect
  • MonteWhiteMonteWhite Posts: 200
    The Kid:
    The Sniper:
    Ive heard it does wonders for the flavor and burn of particularly oily cigars. Gran Habano Vintage 2002's come to mind.

    Yep thats one that I drybox often
    People say this a lot but I usually smoke these straight out of the humidor and they're fine. A little snug draw but nothing problematic. I've only have one with an unsmokeably tight draw, but that was so bad I don't think dryboxing would've even helped. Probably just a dud.
  • MonteWhiteMonteWhite Posts: 200
    Another things that always came to mind is, why must one drybox in an empty unhumidified cigar box? Why can't one just leave it out in the open for a day or two, permitting that one's environment isn't humid already?
  • The_KidThe_Kid Posts: 7,871 ✭✭✭
    MonteWhite:
    Another things that always came to mind is, why must one drybox in an empty unhumidified cigar box? Why can't one just leave it out in the open for a day or two, permitting that one's environment isn't humid already?
    Thats my circumstance, RH outside of humidor is usually above 70, So leaving my cigars out would have an opposite effect. Ive even used desicate pouches inside empty cigar boxes to keep humidity down,I dont have any beads or else I would use those..
  • The_KidThe_Kid Posts: 7,871 ✭✭✭
    MonteWhite:
    The Kid:
    The Sniper:
    Ive heard it does wonders for the flavor and burn of particularly oily cigars. Gran Habano Vintage 2002's come to mind.

    Yep thats one that I drybox often
    People say this a lot but I usually smoke these straight out of the humidor and they're fine. A little snug draw but nothing problematic. I've only have one with an unsmokeably tight draw, but that was so bad I don't think dryboxing would've even helped. Probably just a dud.
    For me the 2002's draw has'nt been an issue, however the burn has, Corojo wrapper.
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    Would someone explain "dry boxing" to me? The term seems self explanatory, but what about specifics, temp, humidity, time, problems, etc.
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    fla-gypsy:
    I have used that technique quite effectively. Cigars are much more resilient that most people expect
    I heard a rep say something similar while he was taking the night's wares out of his trunk. It was +90° outside.
    I understand that some of us, you know who you are, hold their limits to a much stricter standard. Yet, I've found myself, unwittingly, abusing cigars which I then went on to smoke and enjoy. >br> Does anyone have any good stories where the conditions just totally trashed the stick?
  • docbp87docbp87 Posts: 3,521
    beatnic:
    Would someone explain "dry boxing" to me? The term seems self explanatory, but what about specifics, temp, humidity, time, problems, etc.
    Literally putting a cigar in a dry box. Take a cigar that you think may be over humidified, have a tight draw due to wetness or packing, and place it in an empty cigar box that has no source of humidification in it. The cedar will literally absorb moisture from the cigar (albeit, at a low enough rate so as to not damage the cigar), allowing the tobacco to expand and contract as needed to allow a good draw. Leave it there for 12-18 hours, or even a few days in some cases (have had to dry box fresh rolled stuff for up to a week before) or until desired effect is achieved.
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    t/y
  • camgfscamgfs Posts: 968
    I may be jumping in a bit late....
    I am a big fan of "dry boxing". A great example from ccom for the type of cigar to dry box would be the 5Vegas Relic. It has the right kind of oily tobacco that would need a few days of dry-boxing because all the oils will add to the humidity when lit. The heat will make the oils turn into moisture; the cigar may not be over-humidified until lit. I hope that explains the reasons in a way that I did not yet see posted.
    Since I'm Canadian, I have experience with Cuban cigars. You often hear them described as "Oily". Dry boxing helps with better draw and burn, but not every cigar needs or should be dry boxed.

    One thing to remember is that dry boxing shoud not ruin your cigar at all. Experiment a little and try putting different kinds of sticks in a dry box and see how they smoke. You may be pleasantly surprised.

    The Cuban sticks that I like to dry box are:
    • Cohiba Maduro Genios
    • Cohiba Sublimes
    • Partagas SerieD No.4


  • KingoftheCoveKingoftheCove Posts: 932 ✭✭✭
    Since I switched to beads, my "ready to smoke" humi is a rock solid 66%.
    I dry box my Gran Habano 2002s about 8-16 hours - perfect.
    Gurkha Titans need 24hrs - or more sometimes (I must have got a "moist" batch or something) - those Titans will not smoke well right out of my 66% humi - after some time in the dry box they are delicious.

    Most other sticks are fine right out of my smoking humi - but sometimes a stick that doesn't "feel" quite ready will get laid in the dry box for 4-8 hours.

  • JudoChinXJudoChinX Posts: 775
    Dry boxing is something I've heard a lot about, but haven't gotten around to trying. Thanks, everyone, for sharing your experiences. I now have a good place to begin!
  • grannejagranneja Posts: 382
    Glad You brought it up Rob, as was thinking about it the other day. Glad to get the other guys input on time and for which cigars.
  • LasabarLasabar Posts: 4,473 ✭✭✭
    camgfs:
    I may be jumping in a bit late....
    I am a big fan of "dry boxing". A great example from ccom for the type of cigar to dry box would be the 5Vegas Relic. It has the right kind of oily tobacco that would need a few days of dry-boxing because all the oils will add to the humidity when lit. The heat will make the oils turn into moisture; the cigar may not be over-humidified until lit. I hope that explains the reasons in a way that I did not yet see posted.
    Since I'm Canadian, I have experience with Cuban cigars. You often hear them described as "Oily". Dry boxing helps with better draw and burn, but not every cigar needs or should be dry boxed.

    One thing to remember is that dry boxing shoud not ruin your cigar at all. Experiment a little and try putting different kinds of sticks in a dry box and see how they smoke. You may be pleasantly surprised.

    The Cuban sticks that I like to dry box are:
    • Cohiba Maduro Genios
    • Cohiba Sublimes
    • Partagas SerieD No.4


    Ya know... I've always heard that about Cohiba Sublimes... You should probably send me some of yours so I can test this theory, Now I'll have to do a DryBoxed one and a NON DryBoxed one.... So send me mulitples

    I mean, I'm in AMERICA so I can't get Cubans... But YOU are in CANADA So I'd assume Cohiba SUBLIMES are a dime a dozen... RIGHT????

    HAHAHAhA!
  • kevin1323kevin1323 Posts: 294
    Do you guys think that using a non charged herfador would work for dry boxing?
  • camgfscamgfs Posts: 968
    kevin1323:
    Do you guys think that using a non charged herfador would work for dry boxing?
    Yes this will work just fine. Make sure you check to see what humidity you have in there...keeping it in a damp basement might actually contain more humidity than your humi, and that won't help the cigar out at all.

  • camgfscamgfs Posts: 968
    Lasabar:
    camgfs:
    I am a big fan of "dry boxing".
    Since I'm Canadian, I have experience with Cuban cigars. You often hear them described as "Oily". Dry boxing helps with better draw and burn, but not every cigar needs or should be dry boxed.
    The Cuban sticks that I like to dry box are:
    • Cohiba Maduro Genios
    • Cohiba Sublimes
    • Partagas SerieD No.4


    Ya know... I've always heard that about Cohiba Sublimes... You should probably send me some of yours so I can test this theory, Now I'll have to do a DryBoxed one and a NON DryBoxed one.... So send me mulitples

    I mean, I'm in AMERICA so I can't get Cubans... But YOU are in CANADA So I'd assume Cohiba SUBLIMES are a dime a dozen... RIGHT????

    HAHAHAhA!
    lmfaorotf!!!
    Sure thing, 12 for a dime, all the time! They are so cheap that I smoke 2 before breakfast, and feed them to my dog when I run out of doggy chow.......

  • Hawk55Hawk55 Posts: 846
    It works fine. Thst's what I use to dry box. You can actually dry box sticks longer in these.
  • LasabarLasabar Posts: 4,473 ✭✭✭
    kevin1323:
    Do you guys think that using a non charged herfador would work for dry boxing?
    I'd say the dry Herf-a-Dor(r) would be a last resort for me... The plastic and foam does not TAKE IN humidity, just sits there...

    A dry old BOX from cigars is wood that will PULL moisture out of your cigar. If the Herf-a-dor(r) is left open slightly in a DRY climate then it'd be cool, but in Wisconsin when the ambient humidity is around 60-70*Rh.... The Herf-a-dor wouldn't do much good
  • LasabarLasabar Posts: 4,473 ✭✭✭
    Lasabar:
    kevin1323:
    Do you guys think that using a non charged herfador would work for dry boxing?
    I'd say the dry Herf-a-Dor(r) would be a last resort for me... The plastic and foam does not TAKE IN humidity, just sits there...

    A dry old BOX from cigars is wood that will PULL moisture out of your cigar. If the Herf-a-dor(r) is left open slightly in a DRY climate then it'd be cool, but in Wisconsin when the ambient humidity is around 60-70*Rh.... The Herf-a-dor wouldn't do much good
    But again, it depends on your reason for dry boxing... If you want to actually dry out the wrapper of an oily thick cigar then you'd need a cigar box, but if the ambient Rh is wildly different then your humi, then I'd dry box just to get the cigar to the Ambient Rh a little so it wouldn't explode on me... THEN the Herf-a-Dor(r) would work
  • JudoChinXJudoChinX Posts: 775
    I have a cedar lined case that holds three cigars. In your opinions, would that be sufficient for dry boxing?
  • LasabarLasabar Posts: 4,473 ✭✭✭
    JudoChinX:
    I have a cedar lined case that holds three cigars. In your opinions, would that be sufficient for dry boxing?
    Also Depends... I have a case like that that I keep in my humi so that when I need it the Cedar is at the right Rh%... If that's the case no, if the Cedar is dry from being left out then yes.... Technically if your ambient Rh from either the weatherman or the A/C being on, you can leave a cigar OUT in the open for a few hours up to a day to "Dry-Box" it
  • JudoChinXJudoChinX Posts: 775
    Lasabar:
    JudoChinX:
    I have a cedar lined case that holds three cigars. In your opinions, would that be sufficient for dry boxing?
    Also Depends... I have a case like that that I keep in my humi so that when I need it the Cedar is at the right Rh%... If that's the case no, if the Cedar is dry from being left out then yes.... Technically if your ambient Rh from either the weatherman or the A/C being on, you can leave a cigar OUT in the open for a few hours up to a day to "Dry-Box" it
    Sweet. Thanks for the info!
  • The_KidThe_Kid Posts: 7,871 ✭✭✭
    I dont like dry boxes,,,OH DAMN JudoChinX made me say it!!!
  • JudoChinXJudoChinX Posts: 775
    The Kid:
    I dont like dry boxes,,,OH DAMN JudoChinX made me say it!!!
    Haha! I'll take the blame. No problem there.
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    OK. I dry boxed a few GH 2002 until they lost their sheen. Much better burn. Thanks guys!
Sign In or Register to comment.