How Smart Are You?

Olny srmat poelpe can raed this.

I cdnuolt blveiee that I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd what I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in what oredr the ltteers in a word are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the first and last ltteer be in the rgh it pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can still raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the word as a wlohe. Amzanig huh? Yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!

Ok, so I was bored and found this amuzing...
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Comments

  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    It is indeed pretty amazing. I remember the first time I saw that.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭
    PuroFreak:
    Olny srmat poelpe can raed this...
    what does that say?
  • PuroFreakPuroFreak Posts: 4,132
    Hell if I know! Thats why I posted it here, I was hoping to get a translation!
  • dutyjedutyje Posts: 2,263
    I have a theory that the study didn't go as far as it could have in exploring the ability of the human mind to properly re-organize jumbled concepts. For example, if you have read "A Clockwork Orange," there are many words that are simply made up. Yet, through context, you are able to generally determine what the word actually is. Likewise, when I'm reading Poe, there are often words or concepts that I don't understand, but by the time I complete a stanza, my gaps in understanding have been filled by the context.

    This also explains why the English language gets butchered so ridiculously these days. It isn't so much a disrespect for proper grammar as it is an acknowledgement that the human mind doesn't require such precise attention to detail. Also, I have a theory that, as we continue to test the boundaries of our ability to compose and understand text like "Big Dan Speak," our ability to process abstract thoughts is increased as well. The study by itself is interesting, but after getting over the initial novelty of the results, I would ask... now what?
  • dutyjedutyje Posts: 2,263
    another good example would be Lewis Carroll's "Through the Looking Glass"

    or the Smurfs
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    Indeed, duty. I believe a number of books have touched on this theory. I mean have you read anything by Cormac McCarthy? He uses little to no punctuation and rarely if ever tells you who is speaking. It forces you to be more involved with the book IMO.
  • dutyjedutyje Posts: 2,263
    I think I'm one of those dim minds that actually would have a hard time reading something like that. I get too distracted by poor grammar (not that mine is perfect) and spelling (see previous disclaimer). It really bothers me when I'm trying to read a news article that has been poorly written.
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    While its written without punctuation and doesn't tell you who is talking, it amazingly isn't difficult to read. Its written in such a way that those aren't necessary. i.e. two people are in the scene, a father and son. He doesn't tell you who is speaking but the first line will say something like "You know, son". Not hard to figure out who made that statement.
  • dutyjedutyje Posts: 2,263
    its - possessive pronoun

    it's - contraction (it is)
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    dutyje:
    its - possessive pronoun

    it's - contraction (it is)
    That and commas I'm terrible about, I know the rules I just ignore them subconsciously.
  • urbinourbino Posts: 4,517
    dutyje:
    its - possessive pronoun

    it's - contraction (it is)
    And "e" before "n" in "chicken."
  • dutyjedutyje Posts: 2,263
    madurofan:
    dutyje:
    its - possessive pronoun

    it's - contraction (it is)
    That and commas I'm terrible about, I know the rules I just ignore them subconsciously.
    The Tipping Point.

    At first, I thought you had done that on purpose. It distracted me and I needed to read it again to get your point. Of course, that also makes the point that I would have difficulty reading that book. :)
  • Jetmech_63Jetmech_63 Posts: 3,454 ✭✭✭
    dutyje:
    I have a theory that the study didn't go as far as it could have in exploring the ability of the human mind to properly re-organize jumbled concepts. For example, if you have read "A Clockwork Orange," there are many words that are simply made up. Yet, through context, you are able to generally determine what the word actually is. Likewise, when I'm reading Poe, there are often words or concepts that I don't understand, but by the time I complete a stanza, my gaps in understanding have been filled by the context.

    This also explains why the English language gets butchered so ridiculously these days. It isn't so much a disrespect for proper grammar as it is an acknowledgement that the human mind doesn't require such precise attention to detail. Also, I have a theory that, as we continue to test the boundaries of our ability to compose and understand text like "Big Dan Speak," our ability to process abstract thoughts is increased as well. The study by itself is interesting, but after getting over the initial novelty of the results, I would ask... now what?


    Wow, I tinhk I wlil poendr tihs oevr a cgiar....
  • phobicsquirrelphobicsquirrel Posts: 7,349
    cool find. never thought about it.
  • LukoLuko Posts: 2,004
    All these bright minds, and yet we couldn't make heads or tails of Big Dan...
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    LMAO .. so true.
  • dutyjedutyje Posts: 2,263
    Luko:
    All these bright minds, and yet we couldn't make heads or tails of Big Dan...
    Maddy couldn't understand him, either.
  • j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403
    dutyje:
    Luko:
    All these bright minds, and yet we couldn't make heads or tails of Big Dan...
    Maddy couldn't understand him, either.
    Some people couldn't understand him, I, on the other hand, had very little trouble. The kicker of course is that once I did understand him, I wished I hadn't been able to. In the immortal (or was it immoral?) words of Ron White "You can't fix stupid".
  • TumblerTumbler Posts: 338
    dutyje:
    I have a theory that the study didn't go as far as it could have in exploring the ability of the human mind to properly re-organize jumbled concepts. For example, if you have read "A Clockwork Orange," there are many words that are simply made up. Yet, through context, you are able to generally determine what the word actually is. Likewise, when I'm reading Poe, there are often words or concepts that I don't understand, but by the time I complete a stanza, my gaps in understanding have been filled by the context.

    This also explains why the English language gets butchered so ridiculously these days. It isn't so much a disrespect for proper grammar as it is an acknowledgement that the human mind doesn't require such precise attention to detail. Also, I have a theory that, as we continue to test the boundaries of our ability to compose and understand text like "Big Dan Speak," our ability to process abstract thoughts is increased as well. The study by itself is interesting, but after getting over the initial novelty of the results, I would ask... now what?


    I give up... what?
  • urbinourbino Posts: 4,517
    You've been at the sauce, haven't you?
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭
    dutyje:
    I have a theory that the study didn't go as far as it could have in exploring the ability of the human mind to properly re-organize jumbled concepts. For example, if you have read "A Clockwork Orange," there are many words that are simply made up. Yet, through context, you are able to generally determine what the word actually is. Likewise, when I'm reading Poe, there are often words or concepts that I don't understand, but by the time I complete a stanza, my gaps in understanding have been filled by the context.

    This also explains why the English language gets butchered so ridiculously these days. It isn't so much a disrespect for proper grammar as it is an acknowledgement that the human mind doesn't require such precise attention to detail. Also, I have a theory that, as we continue to test the boundaries of our ability to compose and understand text like "Big Dan Speak," our ability to process abstract thoughts is increased as well. The study by itself is interesting, but after getting over the initial novelty of the results, I would ask... now what?
    do you think that the James Joyce novel Finnegans Wake was an attempt to take on and understand how we ingest abstract thoughts and organize them into coherent ideas? Many parts of the book are hard to understand in and of themselves. many times its hard to NOT have your mind wander while you read. but if you focus and re-read, and maybe even take notes, the plot emerges.


    for those who dont know, the book is very dream-like and stream of consciousness. The plot is hard to find through all of this and it is VERY difficult to read. ( i forced my way through it once... never really got it) you need more than context clues to get that book. It would be like the above experiment with words but with a word you dont know. you cant use context clues to understand it and your brain wont organize it into a nice "word" because you have never seen the real word before.


    example:

    "I loved him for nothing so much as his foccciinaunihilliilifichilinpation of money"

    the above very long word is not in order. your brain will not proscess it because it probably has never seen that word before. whats strange is, i have, so i can casually glance at it and get it.



    even if you try to look at it and figure it out, you cant if you have never seen the real word.





    you have no idea what that word is do ya?

    it IS a real word. the actual spelling is"
    Floccinaucinihilipilification

    for those who dont wanna click on the link it (in short) means the act of describing something as useless or becoming useless via depreciation.
    OR
    feeling small or insignificant because of your own depreciation compared to your surroundings.
    context clues would never have helped you.
  • dutyjedutyje Posts: 2,263
    So you're saying context clues are only helpful in the event that the observer has had a sufficient base of prior experience? I can agree with that.
  • kaspera79kaspera79 Posts: 7,259 ✭✭✭
    Luko:
    All these bright minds, and yet we couldn't make heads or tails of Big Dan...
    who was it, rusirius, that called him out, and tore him up ? I haven't seen him around for a while either. Wonder what's up with our close shaven friend ?
  • LukoLuko Posts: 2,004
    Obviously Big Dan took him out. You DON'T call out Big Dan.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭
    kaspera79:
    Luko:
    All these bright minds, and yet we couldn't make heads or tails of Big Dan...
    who was it, rusirius, that called him out, and tore him up ? I haven't seen him around for a while either. Wonder what's up with our close shaven friend ?
    lets just home he didnt shave too close on his neck.
  • j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403
    Luko:
    Obviously Big Dan took him out. You DON'T call out Big Dan.
    And you don't mess around with Jim. Ah doo doo dooda dee dee dee dee dee.
  • LukoLuko Posts: 2,004
    j0z3r:
    Luko:
    Obviously Big Dan took him out. You DON'T call out Big Dan.
    And you don't mess around with Jim. Ah doo doo dooda dee dee dee dee dee.
    I did spit on Superman's cape once.
  • gmill880gmill880 Posts: 5,947
    i pulled the mask off the 'ol lone ranger--chuck norris was behind it
  • PuroFreakPuroFreak Posts: 4,132
    kuzi16:
    kaspera79:
    Luko:
    All these bright minds, and yet we couldn't make heads or tails of Big Dan...
    who was it, rusirius, that called him out, and tore him up ? I haven't seen him around for a while either. Wonder what's up with our close shaven friend ?
    lets just home he didnt shave too close on his neck.
    Most little boys wore Superman underwear growing up, but Superman wore Rusirius underwear as a little boy! lol
  • j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403
    PuroFreak:
    kuzi16:
    kaspera79:
    Luko:
    All these bright minds, and yet we couldn't make heads or tails of Big Dan...
    who was it, rusirius, that called him out, and tore him up ? I haven't seen him around for a while either. Wonder what's up with our close shaven friend ?
    lets just home he didnt shave too close on his neck.
    Most little boys wore Superman underwear growing up, but Superman wore Rusirius underwear as a little boy! lol
    I don't know about that one...Greg's a badass, but he's no Chuck Norris. :)
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