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GRow Your own?

lcpleellcpleel Posts: 3,455 ✭✭✭
Just wondering if anyone has ever tried growing there own plant to harvest and smoked. No im not talking about that type of plant... but Nicotiana tabacum.
Im thinking about trying to grow some myself and even with the fall and winter around the corner I think I have a chance of success being in CA.
What I was really wondering is the curing portion. Whats the best way?

Comments

  • greg2648greg2648 Posts: 2,440 ✭✭✭
    lcpleel:
    Just wondering if anyone has ever tried growing there own plant to harvest and smoked. No im not talking about that type of plant... but Nicotiana tabacum.
    Im thinking about trying to grow some myself and even with the fall and winter around the corner I think I have a chance of success being in CA.
    What I was really wondering is the curing portion. Whats the best way?
    When they are ready, I am good for a 5'er.
  • lcpleellcpleel Posts: 3,455 ✭✭✭
    greg2648:
    lcpleel:
    Just wondering if anyone has ever tried growing there own plant to harvest and smoked. No im not talking about that type of plant... but Nicotiana tabacum.
    Im thinking about trying to grow some myself and even with the fall and winter around the corner I think I have a chance of success being in CA.
    What I was really wondering is the curing portion. Whats the best way?
    When they are ready, I am good for a 5'er.
    LOL you got it.
  • jr_p951jr_p951 Posts: 1,121
    Ca Puros!! Those would be rare and could be considered high end since they are impossible to get!!
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,633 ✭✭✭✭
    the best way to cure is in a curing chamber that you can build yourself. both the humidity and the temp need to be regulated but it can be done for not as much as you think.

    with a bit of effort and some time, it isnt unheard of.
    For the sides of the tobacco curing chamber use sheets of 2-inch thick polystyrene. three-ish should be good to build a tobacco curing chamber measuring 1 metre square by 1 and a half metres high.
    for heat use an oil filled heater that is able to run at a constant 130°f .

    Moisture needs to be raised inside the tobacco curing chamber to keep the leaf flexible but not wet. A humidifier is ideal for this. Humidifiers are little more than water tanks with a fan to blow a fine mist of water into the air.
    Hold the base, sides and top of the curing chamber together with double sided carpet tape or other strong tapes. Cut an opening in one side to act as a door. Use tape as a hinge to keep the door closed.

    drill a hole in the top and a hole in the bottom for air flow (fresh air in and ammonia out)

    im not 100% sure what exactly the RH needs to be, and im not 100% sure how to make the humidifier but this is the gist of the curing chamber.

    it is a scaled down version of what is in all of the curing rooms in most of the major factories ive seen.

  • lcpleellcpleel Posts: 3,455 ✭✭✭
    kuzi16:
    the best way to cure is in a curing chamber that you can build yourself. both the humidity and the temp need to be regulated but it can be done for not as much as you think.

    with a bit of effort and some time, it isnt unheard of.
    For the sides of the tobacco curing chamber use sheets of 2-inch thick polystyrene. three-ish should be good to build a tobacco curing chamber measuring 1 metre square by 1 and a half metres high.
    for heat use an oil filled heater that is able to run at a constant 130°f .

    Moisture needs to be raised inside the tobacco curing chamber to keep the leaf flexible but not wet. A humidifier is ideal for this. Humidifiers are little more than water tanks with a fan to blow a fine mist of water into the air.
    Hold the base, sides and top of the curing chamber together with double sided carpet tape or other strong tapes. Cut an opening in one side to act as a door. Use tape as a hinge to keep the door closed.

    drill a hole in the top and a hole in the bottom for air flow (fresh air in and ammonia out)

    im not 100% sure what exactly the RH needs to be, and im not 100% sure how to make the humidifier but this is the gist of the curing chamber.

    it is a scaled down version of what is in all of the curing rooms in most of the major factories ive seen.

    You the man! I should have this project up and running a short amount of time.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,633 ✭✭✭✭
    all i can seem to find is not to have it too dry because then you wont get even color.
    the goal is to have it pliable at all times but not "wet"
    im guessing about 80% rh or so.
    moving air is a huge plus to help prevent mold.

    oh... and dont break the stems within the leaves if you can. this will release a bad flavor/aroma into the leaf when smoking. after the cure is done it isnt as big of a deal.
  • JSaintJSaint Orfordville, WIPosts: 1,879 ✭✭✭
    Id be down for a 5er too =p. Should think ahead and start crafting your own boxes lol!
    "Beauty is in the eye when you hold her." -Ricky
  • skweekzskweekz PAPosts: 2,279 ✭✭✭
    I really can't wait to see this happen! Good luck on your endeavor!
  • greg2648greg2648 Posts: 2,440 ✭✭✭
    When you roll my 5'er, I would prefer 3 toros and 2 torps. Just throw them in a bag and ship em. lol.
  • sightunseensightunseen Posts: 2,130
    That sounds like a pretty awesome experiment. Let us know how it goes if you decide to go for it.
  • I've been thinkin about doing some growing ever since I moved from the city(Philadelphia)
    I now have a little land here I am only about 45 mins. from Philadelphia.

    There is also a nice sized feild behind my property that I am told that has been leased for farming in the past.
    I will use the winter to do more reserch and preperation. I think it will be fun. the fermentation part is going to take the real effort though.
    After the growing season the temp and humidity control are my concerns. I am going to have to build a barn and add climate control. Well maybe more of a shed to start.
    This is gonna take a bit of time so I won't be offering samples for at least 2 years, but if everything goes well I will be sure to let all you BOLTs know.
  • BigT06BigT06 Posts: 3,899
    greg2648:
    When you roll my 5'er, I would prefer 3 toros and 2 torps. Just throw them in a bag and ship em. lol.
    not me... I'd prefer coronas. Thanks.
  • ShotgunJohnShotgunJohn Lakewood WAPosts: 1,545 ✭✭
    greg2648:
    When you roll my 5'er, I would prefer 3 toros and 2 torps. Just throw them in a bag and ship em. lol.
    What not perfectos and figurados?
  • JudoChinXJudoChinX Posts: 775
    I'm definitely curious on how this turns out. Keep us informed!
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,633 ✭✭✭✭
    Flash318:
    the fermentation part is going to take the real effort though.
    i agree 100%

    part of what will make this difficult is the yield.
    the pilones that are traditionally used to ferment tobacco are very large. im talking, 12 feet by 6 feet by 5 feet high.
    ....and all of that tobacco is the same. by that i mean, it is all the same seed, the same priming, and the same quality.
    in the center of the pilone is a thermometer that sticks out far enough someone can see what the temp is at the center of the pile. each manufacturer has a target temp they go for and once the pilone hits that temp, they break it down and rotate it so that it ferments evenly. the piles are large enough that this takes the better part of a day to do.


    the problem is not so much how do you get tobacco to ferment, that knowledge was just typed out, but rather, how do you "fake" the conditions that exist in the pilones?
    that is a far more difficult task.
    there are so many benefits to the pilone that make it the most used fermentation technique in the business: the weight, the moisture, the heat, the fact that it is all the same tobacco.


    if we are talking growing a handful of plants, the conditions are going to be hard to recreate.
  • wwesternwwestern Posts: 1,397 ✭✭✭
    Wouldn't it just be easier in the way of your conditions in a small bundle would stay much more consistent through out so you wouldn't really have to rearrange to keep it stable?
  • kuzi16:
    Flash318:
    the fermentation part is going to take the real effort though.
    i agree 100%

    part of what will make this difficult is the yield.
    the pilones that are traditionally used to ferment tobacco are very large. im talking, 12 feet by 6 feet by 5 feet high.
    ....and all of that tobacco is the same. by that i mean, it is all the same seed, the same priming, and the same quality.
    in the center of the pilone is a thermometer that sticks out far enough someone can see what the temp is at the center of the pile. each manufacturer has a target temp they go for and once the pilone hits that temp, they break it down and rotate it so that it ferments evenly. the piles are large enough that this takes the better part of a day to do.


    the problem is not so much how do you get tobacco to ferment, that knowledge was just typed out, but rather, how do you "fake" the conditions that exist in the pilones?
    that is a far more difficult task.
    there are so many benefits to the pilone that make it the most used fermentation technique in the business: the weight, the moisture, the heat, the fact that it is all the same tobacco.


    if we are talking growing a handful of plants, the conditions are going to be hard to recreate.
    I am thinking 200-300 plants.
    YES the question of "fakeing" the conditions of th pilone is a concern. Haveing no experience, hell I've never seen a tobacco plant in person. I have a long way to go as far as research. For me it will be mostly for the enjoyment of learning something new. And a simple joy of watching a seed sprout and grow into a plant and develope.
    No instant gratifacation there. Just a slow prosses. But this for me will be an experiment so the end result isnt the goal. I am not looking to be a full time farmer, just to see how a city boy can actually get into the dirt.
    So I need alot more knowledge on the "science" of it all. But this whole endevor will be fun. The oppertunity to learn and experiment with the possibility of my hard work and efforts to produce fruit. I reconize this will be no small task, but I am sure the experience will give back in so many ways, hopefuly most of all an even greater appreation of what it takes to make our beloved cigars.
  • RBeckomRBeckom Home or out and about somewhere.Posts: 2,190 ✭✭✭
    I've grown two crops this year and I'm in the curing stage now. I plan to hold the humidity around 75% with A humidifier and fan combo. All my research states that the fermentation time varies from six to eight weeks depending on the type of tobacco grown. The suggestion about A oil filled heater will work fine but you'll need to add A water heater thermostat to maintain the heat necessary to ferment your tobacco properly. You'll need to maintain about 130 degrees. I'll post pictures of my chamber as soon as I learn how. Good luck with your experiment.
  • lcpleellcpleel Posts: 3,455 ✭✭✭
    kuzi16:
    Flash318:
    the fermentation part is going to take the real effort though.
    i agree 100%

    part of what will make this difficult is the yield.
    the pilones that are traditionally used to ferment tobacco are very large. im talking, 12 feet by 6 feet by 5 feet high.
    ....and all of that tobacco is the same. by that i mean, it is all the same seed, the same priming, and the same quality.
    in the center of the pilone is a thermometer that sticks out far enough someone can see what the temp is at the center of the pile. each manufacturer has a target temp they go for and once the pilone hits that temp, they break it down and rotate it so that it ferments evenly. the piles are large enough that this takes the better part of a day to do.


    the problem is not so much how do you get tobacco to ferment, that knowledge was just typed out, but rather, how do you "fake" the conditions that exist in the pilones?
    that is a far more difficult task.
    there are so many benefits to the pilone that make it the most used fermentation technique in the business: the weight, the moisture, the heat, the fact that it is all the same tobacco.


    if we are talking growing a handful of plants, the conditions are going to be hard to recreate.
    Problem solved! I pick up a used in working outdoor sauna next week.
  • RBeckom:
    I've grown two crops this year and I'm in the curing stage now. I plan to hold the humidity around 75% with A humidifier and fan combo. All my research states that the fermentation time varies from six to eight weeks depending on the type of tobacco grown. The suggestion about A oil filled heater will work fine but you'll need to add A water heater thermostat to maintain the heat necessary to ferment your tobacco properly. You'll need to maintain about 130 degrees. I'll post pictures of my chamber as soon as I learn how. Good luck with your experiment.
    What type(s) of seed did you grow? About how many plants?
    Any pics would be helpful. Thanks
  • fla-gypsyfla-gypsy Posts: 3,024 ✭✭
    I think I may grow a few plants for ornamental reasons. I have grown fond of the Nicotania Tabacum
  • JonathanEJonathanE Posts: 401
    lcpleel:
    Problem solved! I pick up a used in working outdoor sauna next week.Problem solved! I pick up a used in working outdoor sauna next week.
    Nice! You've either got too much time, too much money or both! That's an awesome project though. If I lived nearby I'd give you a hand with the weeding or something. Put me down for a fiver too!

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