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New Humidor question...

robbyrasrobbyras Posts: 5,487
Hey fellas! I'm new to the site and new to cigars. My fiance got me a humidor for Christmas. I think she got it from Red Envelope. Anyway, I went through the seasoning process based on the instructions. Used distilled water and all that. So, they said it should sit between 70 and 75%. I've noticed some of the posters here keep theirs set to 68-70%. Am I too humid? Here is my second question and I feel like a moron asking it, but better to be a moron than sorry. When storing in the humidor, it is best to keep the cigar is it's original wrapper, correct? Also, any suggestions on decently priced cigars for a beginner would be great. I recently enjoyed a Gran Habano No. 5 Corojo. It was part of the Christmas give and I loved it. Thanks in advance!

Comments

  • PuroFreakPuroFreak Posts: 4,132
    Hey there Robby, welcome to the board! We have a lot of great guys on here with a lot of knowledge on cigars and humidors. I would suggest keeping the humidity aroun 65-70% to prevent mold.

    As far as good decent priced smokes, the 5 Vegas series A on c-com is a great smoke at a decent price. Also my personal favorite value the onyx Reserve! Great smoke that you can usually find for $50-$60 a box and they are great! Lots of flavor and very smooth. Even better after about 6 months resting in the Humi. Also the Oliva Serie G Maduro is a great smoke. Pretty much anything out of the Oliva line is pretty popular here on the board. I hope these suggestions help and I'm sure you will get loads more input from the guys here! Welcome again and I hope to see ya around here in the future.
  • robbyrasrobbyras Posts: 5,487
    Awesome! Thanks for the welcome Jason. So to get the humidity down, I just leave it open for a while, correct? I noticed that the Vegas 5 and Oliva brands are pretty well liked around here. I will look into ordering a a sampler or 2. You will definitely hear more from me as time passes. Thanks again for the quick and friendly feedback.
  • urbinourbino Posts: 4,517
    Welcome aboard, robby. Puro's advice is sound. I'll just add one thing. When it comes to humidity, it's largely a matter of finding the level you like; some people like the way their cigars smoke at a higher RH, some like them better at a lower RH. As long as it's somewhere between 65 and 75%, you'll be fine. As Puro mentioned, though, when you get toward the top end of that range your risk of mold goes up.
  • robbyrasrobbyras Posts: 5,487
    Thanks for the follow-up. I think I am going to try to stick to 70% for the time being (I assume I just leave the lid open for a while to get the humidity down) . The last thing I want is mold. After looking around and reading some posts, I will look into getting a digital hydrometer as well. My humidor came with a dial and it sounds like those aren't too reliable.
  • btmislesbtmisles Posts: 125
    To answer your storage and packaging question, I think we have all decided it is all up to personal preference but a majority of the people here keep the cello on. The cello is porous and will not affect the ability to keep the cigar at the proper humidity and does a very good job of protecting the wrapper from handling damage. I am one of the few that take the cello off and I have no good reason for it other that I like the look and aroma when I open the humi. Some people are concerned that the marrying of flavors and oils will occur with unwrapped cigars but I am not sure that that will happen unless they are aged together for a very long time.
  • robbyrasrobbyras Posts: 5,487
    I was curious about the marrying of flavors myself, but I can see your point about the time frame.
  • KriegKrieg Posts: 5,092 ✭✭✭
    btmisles:
    To answer your storage and packaging question, I think we have all decided it is all up to personal preference but a majority of the people here keep the cello on. The cello is porous and will not affect the ability to keep the cigar at the proper humidity and does a very good job of protecting the wrapper from handling damage. I am one of the few that take the cello off and I have no good reason for it other that I like the look and aroma when I open the humi. Some people are concerned that the marrying of flavors and oils will occur with unwrapped cigars but I am not sure that that will happen unless they are aged together for a very long time.
    I am also one of the few that take the cello off, for the same reasons you listed. I love the smell of my smokes and cedar. You might also want to look into getting some beads from heartfelt industries. Beads will keep your humidity levels more steady than foam. you can either buy beads that will either keep your RH at 70% or 65%. It only uses distilled water. They little bit more pricey than regular foam humidifyers, but as the saying goes, "if you buy the best, you only cry once".
  • urbinourbino Posts: 4,517
    robbyras:
    I was curious about the marrying of flavors myself, but I can see your point about the time frame.
    The important exception, of course, is infused cigars. You don't wanna put those in with your other stogies, even if you leave the cello on.
  • JKTexJKTex Posts: 92
    When I moved all mie stick into my new humidor, I got the itch and pulled all the cello off the ones that had it.

    I dug and dug recently looking for the definitive answer and found it's mostly personal preference and that most of the myths were just that.  As said the cello is porous but I like the look and they stack better without.  Something new.
  • JKTexJKTex Posts: 92
    If instead of 100% distilled water, you use propylene glycol, mold should not be a problem.
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    JKTex:
    When I moved all mie stick into my new humidor, I got the itch and pulled all the cello off the ones that had it.

    I dug and dug recently looking for the definitive answer and found it's mostly personal preference and that most of the myths were just that.  As said the cello is porous but I like the look and they stack better without.  Something new.
    Most of us leave the cello on purely for protective purposes. If you go naked you'll start to notice cracks, chips etc, especially if you're handling your sticks regularly.
  • kaspera79kaspera79 Posts: 7,259 ✭✭✭
    madurofan:
    JKTex:
    When I moved all mie stick into my new humidor, I got the itch and pulled all the cello off the ones that had it.

    I dug and dug recently looking for the definitive answer and found it's mostly personal preference and that most of the myths were just that.  As said the cello is porous but I like the look and they stack better without.  Something new.
    . If you go naked you'll start to notice cracks, chips etc, especially if you're handling your sticks regularly.
    Maddy, are you just asking for a raised eyebrow reply...
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    kaspera79:
    madurofan:
    JKTex:
    When I moved all mie stick into my new humidor, I got the itch and pulled all the cello off the ones that had it.

    I dug and dug recently looking for the definitive answer and found it's mostly personal preference and that most of the myths were just that.  As said the cello is porous but I like the look and they stack better without.  Something new.
    . If you go naked you'll start to notice cracks, chips etc, especially if you're handling your sticks regularly.
    Maddy, are you just asking for a raised eyebrow reply...
    LOL well I was being serious but damn I left that open for an urbi or duty perversion.
  • Depending on the size of your humidor I personnally recommend the Humi-Care digital humidity control unit. The unit measures 2 1/2" X 4" X 6", it is easy to set up, and is pretty much set and forget once in place. A lot of books on cigars talk about the optimum range for humidors, technically the best is 70F and 70% however there is a sliding scale which pretty much goes for one degree higher the humidity should be one % lower and vice-versa. Minimize time the time you have the humidor open, know what you want, go in get it, and get out. I prefer taking my cigars out of the wrapper, it allows the different oils/smells to mingle, I do recommend keeping the heavies away from the light cigars. Hmmmmm, cigars for a new guy, CAO Brazilia, Americano, Rock Patel 10 or 12 year aged, Ashton's San Cristobol. Trust me on this, get the advice from here, not from the Cigar store in the mall with a teenager running the shop, they ain't got a clue. I do recommend if you ever go through or near Omaha to stop here www.cigarros.com them girls know their cigars. Enjoy. Rick
  • urbinourbino Posts: 4,517
    madurofan:
    If you go naked you'll start to notice cracks, chips etc, especially if you're handling your sticks regularly.
    I've definitely noticed some cracks when I'm naked, but no chips, thank god.
  • kaspera79kaspera79 Posts: 7,259 ✭✭✭
    rdpitts43:
    . Hmmmmm, cigars for a new guy, CAO Brazilia, Americano, Rock Patel 10 or 12 year aged, Ashton's San Cristobol.
    I don't know what you are trying to do to new guys, but CAO Brazilia and America are not exactly starter cigars. That Brazilia will have them wishing they never started smoking if they aren't careful.. . Even the Patel's I think you mean the vintage 90 and 92, are close to full bodied and may take some working up to.. All fine cigars just not for freshmen..
  • urbinourbino Posts: 4,517
    I dunno. The RP '92 was one of the first cigars I tried when I started again last year. I enjoyed it.
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    urbino:
    madurofan:
    If you go naked you'll start to notice cracks, chips etc, especially if you're handling your sticks regularly.
    I've definitely noticed some cracks when I'm naked, but no chips, thank god.
    Its only a matter of time with that advancing age of yours.
  • I gave a Brazilia Amazon to a friend, he quit smoking cigarettes a while back, and he enjoyed it. I find the CAO Italia, Brazilia, and Americano to be in the medium level of smoke, they do not disappoint from start to finish, if they go out they relight well without too much "burnt" flavor and the cost is not that bad. The RP's have a great flavor and getting one in a robusto caliber will not dent the pocket book that bad. There are some great mild smokes out there but I guess it is all depending on what and how to introduce some one to cigar smoking. I certainly would neither whip out my pricy cigars nor my heavy smokes, I lean towards the medium so the smoker has the choice to move up or down on their next smoke. You do have a point though, I am so use to some really nice heavy hitters that my choice of "medium" smoke might be what a sophmore would consider a "heavy", will have to scour my collection to see if I have a "light weight" though I doubt I do.
  • phobicsquirrelphobicsquirrel Posts: 7,349
    kaspera79:
    rdpitts43:
    . Hmmmmm, cigars for a new guy, CAO Brazilia, Americano, Rock Patel 10 or 12 year aged, Ashton's San Cristobol.
    I don't know what you are trying to do to new guys, but CAO Brazilia and America are not exactly starter cigars. That Brazilia will have them wishing they never started smoking if they aren't careful.. . Even the Patel's I think you mean the vintage 90 and 92, are close to full bodied and may take some working up to.. All fine cigars just not for freshmen..
    The America, really? I found it to be a mild smoke with lots of flavor. The 92 is a little strong, but then again I feel the 90 was mild too.
  • phobicsquirrelphobicsquirrel Posts: 7,349
    madurofan:
    urbino:
    madurofan:
    If you go naked you'll start to notice cracks, chips etc, especially if you're handling your sticks regularly.
    I've definitely noticed some cracks when I'm naked, but no chips, thank god.
    Its only a matter of time with that advancing age of yours.
    lol
  • kaspera79kaspera79 Posts: 7,259 ✭✭✭
    phobicsquirrel:
    kaspera79:
    rdpitts43:
    . Hmmmmm, cigars for a new guy, CAO Brazilia, Americano, Rock Patel 10 or 12 year aged, Ashton's San Cristobol.
    I don't know what you are trying to do to new guys, but CAO Brazilia and America are not exactly starter cigars. That Brazilia will have them wishing they never started smoking if they aren't careful.. . Even the Patel's I think you mean the vintage 90 and 92, are close to full bodied and may take some working up to.. All fine cigars just not for freshmen..
    The America, really? I found it to be a mild smoke with lots of flavor. The 92 is a little strong, but then again I feel the 90 was mild too.
    Maybe mild-er once you have tried several hundred cigars. But far up the road from say Macanudo, Vega Gold, La Aurora, Cusano 18, Fonseca, or some Ashtons..
  • RainRain Posts: 8,960 ✭✭✭
    Bump for RR's first post.
  • RhamlinRhamlin WVPosts: 7,444 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Wow! So Robby was once a newb to. Hmm where's Kuzis first post?
  • ddubridgeddubridge Posts: 3,979 ✭✭✭
    Rhamlin:
    Wow! So Robby was once a newb to. Hmm where's Kuzis first post?
    Rain bumped that one yesterday. It' over in General - "what's with the new blog?" sounds like he knew it all even back then
  • Lee.mcglynnLee.mcglynn HahahahaaaaaPosts: 5,993 ✭✭✭✭
    What ever happened to maduro fan?
    Money can't buy taste
  • scarlinscarlin Posts: 1,592
    Rhamlin:
    Wow! So Robby was once a newb to. Hmm where's Kuzis first post?
    Good luck finding that one..
  • VisionVision Posts: 2,725 ✭✭✭
    scarlin:
    Rhamlin:
    Wow! So Robby was once a newb to. Hmm where's Kuzis first post?
    Good luck finding that one..

    Wow! Even Robby is human. I wonder if he ever took the "wrappers" off or just left the leaf on. Kisses Robby!!!!
  • raisindotraisindot BostonPosts: 1,308 ✭✭✭
    kaspera79:
    rdpitts43:
    . Hmmmmm, cigars for a new guy, CAO Brazilia, Americano, Rock Patel 10 or 12 year aged, Ashton's San Cristobol.
    I don't know what you are trying to do to new guys, but CAO Brazilia and America are not exactly starter cigars. That Brazilia will have them wishing they never started smoking if they aren't careful.. . Even the Patel's I think you mean the vintage 90 and 92, are close to full bodied and may take some working up to.. All fine cigars just not for freshmen..
    Interesting. When I started taking up this stinkin' hobby I almost quit after trying (what I thought was) the bland, flavorless 5 Vegas and Macundo I got with my humidor. It was only my third cigar--a JoyDN Antono, that knocked me off my a** and convinced me to stick with it. One could make a case that for some it makes more sense to start off with a full-bodied cigar, which gives you the most intense experience, and then work your way down to other kinds.
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