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Reading cigar descriptions

So for the longest time cigars were given to me, now that I am buying my own, I am having issues with the cigar descriptions.

Is there any good way to actually figure out what I am getting without just trying?

Comments

  • DirewolfDirewolf Posts: 3,493
    Check out the review section here. They way most these guys descibe the smokes will really help ya in finding some that you would like to try.
  • The_KidThe_Kid Posts: 7,871 ✭✭✭
    Please elaborate.
  • The Kid:
    Please elaborate.


    It's just overwhelming to read some of them. For example:

    Filled with a flavorful concoction Nicaraguan, long leaf tobaccos, Tabak Especial is simply an excellently blended hand-made. It offers crisp flavors of earth and cedar, infused with powerful nuances of espresso and cocoa to create an incredibly rich, complex flavor only noticeable in an infused blend by Drew Estate. The burn, quality of product, and construction are all top notch. The blend is medium-bodied, with almost every size offering a “shaggy foot,” which allows the flavors of the filler and binder tobaccos to be tasted separately from the wrapper. This blend is available in a smooth and silky Connecticut or a dark and rich Maduro wrapper. Tabak Especial is another welcomed, well received addition to the Drew Estate family of brands.

    I don't know how the taste of one tobacco tastes against another, and when I think of the flavor of "earth" I think of dirt. I find myself reading about a bunch of different cigars with no clue what I am reading or going to get. For the most part I rely on if a friend has tried it or not.
  • docbp87docbp87 Posts: 3,521
    Waffles:
    I don't know how the taste of one tobacco tastes against another, and when I think of the flavor of "earth" I think of dirt.
    It takes time, practice, and experience, as well as a healthy desire to pay attention to what you are tasting and actually try to pull flavors from a cigar to really develop your palate to the point where you will be able to read a description of a cigar and know what they mean by the flavors described. Trying everything you can, and really paying close attention while you are smoking, as well as maybe taking notes, so you can compare during later smoking sessions really is the way to do it. It also doesn't help to familiarize yourself with the flavors most commonly found in cigars... try different coffees, eat good, high quality dark chocolate with varying percentages of cocoa, walk into a leather shop, and really get to know that oiled leather aroma, etc.
  • asianbiker8asianbiker8 Posts: 551
    Waffles:
    The Kid:
    Please elaborate.
    It's just overwhelming to read some of them. For example: Filled with a flavorful concoction Nicaraguan, long leaf tobaccos, Tabak Especial is simply an excellently blended hand-made. It offers crisp flavors of earth and cedar, infused with powerful nuances of espresso and cocoa to create an incredibly rich, complex flavor only noticeable in an infused blend by Drew Estate. The burn, quality of product, and construction are all top notch. The blend is medium-bodied, with almost every size offering a “shaggy foot,” which allows the flavors of the filler and binder tobaccos to be tasted separately from the wrapper. This blend is available in a smooth and silky Connecticut or a dark and rich Maduro wrapper. Tabak Especial is another welcomed, well received addition to the Drew Estate family of brands. I don't know how the taste of one tobacco tastes against another, and when I think of the flavor of "earth" I think of dirt. I find myself reading about a bunch of different cigars with no clue what I am reading or going to get. For the most part I rely on if a friend has tried it or not.
    I'm kind of in the same boat, I try to focus on the flavors that they describe, like cocoa, espresso, sweet, and such like that. And I also try to find as many reviews of the stick as I can online and see what other people say. If I end up not liking them, eh, I gift some of them out to some of my friends to try.
  • MVW67MVW67 WisconsinPosts: 5,581 ✭✭✭
    Dire had a good comment, check out the reviews here. The thing to remember also is that a cigar that is liked by others may not appeal to your taste. Experimenting, keeping track and enjoying each one can have great benefit in selecting what kind of cigars fits your pallet, by flavor,aromas,strength and so on.
    Life is too short, live it like no tomorrow...
  • bandyt09bandyt09 AKA Mr. Barley & Mr. HopsPosts: 4,339 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Waffles - It also helps when you read reviews try to find reviews of cigars that you have already smoked and see if you can find things in common with those that you like. Also, see if you can find reviewERs that have similar tastes as yours (this will take time) and then you can use them as a sounding board. I have a sounding board here on the forum as we run really close to liking the exact same thing, yes j0z3r it's you, and I have saved a bunch of money based on his opinion of sticks that he has smoked and I have yet to smoke. Not everyone has the same tastes and likes.

    asianbiker8 - If you don't like it at first put it aside for at least 6 months and try it again, if it didn't get ANY better by that time, then gift them to friends. I have had to purchase too many cigars that I gave away after initially smoking and didn't like only to find they got much better after resting for a while. This will lead to a couple of things:

    1)You will start having more and more aged cigars
    2)You will get to see what aging can do to cigars
    3)You can gift "aged" cigars to friends.
  • asianbiker8asianbiker8 Posts: 551
    Good point bandyt, I will do that. I've started to date my cigars as I get them to see if I like them more, or less, after they sit for a while. The oldest ones that I have bought are only 4 months old so far.
  • j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403
    That was a good and thorough post Todd.
  • bandyt09bandyt09 AKA Mr. Barley & Mr. HopsPosts: 4,339 ✭✭✭✭✭
    asianbiker8:
    Good point bandyt, I will do that. I've started to date my cigars as I get them to see if I like them more, or less, after they sit for a while. The oldest ones that I have bought are only 4 months old so far.
    Derrick, if you start doing it now, you'll be able to sit back in about 2 years and laugh about what you "found" in the humidor the other day. I never "planned" to age but it happened by default by buying 5 packs of sticks, now I am a "compulsive" ager.
  • bandyt09bandyt09 AKA Mr. Barley & Mr. HopsPosts: 4,339 ✭✭✭✭✭
    j0z3r:
    That was a good and thorough post Todd.
    Thanks Joe or are you only saying that because I used your name and gave you credit for something, LOL.
  • Bucking_WBucking_W TexasPosts: 208 ✭✭
    I use to buy two or three from my local B&M but these blogs and reviews here have been a great source. Just see what everyone is trading around and go pick several up. It's been good for me watching these guys trade.
  • j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403
    bandyt09:
    j0z3r:
    That was a good and thorough post Todd.
    Thanks Joe or are you only saying that because I used your name and gave you credit for something, LOL.
    No reason why it can't be both, is there?
  • A lot of good info here. Thank you all for your help.
  • bigharpoonbigharpoon Posts: 2,963 ✭✭✭
    The part which you brought up, the tasting of one tobacco against another, is explained in your quoted description where it says they come with a shaggy foot. This means the filler and binder leaves stick out past the wrapper and have kind of a shaggy, uncut appearance. When you light your cigar at first you will only be smoking these leaves and will have a taste strictly related to the filler and binder tobacco. Once the burn hits the wrapper you should notice a change of flavor as that leaf contributes to the smoke. This new dimension will be what the wrapper has to offer for flavor and with the shaggy foot construction you stand a good chance at making the differentiation.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭✭
    there are also many brands that put out the same cigar with different wrappers. compare those. Arturo Fuente 8-5-8 comes in candela, maduro and cameroon.

    Oliva O and G come in a natural and maduro version.

    im sure if i took more than 2 seconds to think about it i could come up with a dozen or so more.

    if you can smoke both of them at the same time. youll see the differences and you will see what is the same. what tastes different is the wrapper. what tastes the same is the filler.
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