Kwanzaa

VulchorVulchor FloridaPosts: 4,601 ✭✭✭
Hope I dont offend any black brothers here (not meant to sound as it did, lol)......But I decided to take a read about Kwanzaa a few minutes ago on old Wikipedia.

May I just say that if there were such a "holiday" started by a white man, with the same ideals-tenets-ect as this one, and made specifically for white anglo saxons-----it would be immediately lambasted by the media, declared illegal by the courts, likened to the KKK, ect. I understand what the ideas area, and what people appear to accept it as now. However, in my own opinion, this seems to have been a Holiday started in a type of black power, or at leat black empower movement-----and again, if I decided to celebrate white culture, white family, white business, ect.......Id be David Duke.

Comments

  • jr_p951jr_p951 Posts: 1,121
    I wasn't sure about Kwanazz either so I had to go read for myself...I'd say your right. It even said that "that it was meant to be an alternative to Christmas, that Jesus was psychotic, and that Christianity was a white religion that black people should shun." and was linked to "black nationalist movement of the 1960s". The seven principals had great meaning though. I could see how that could be construed as racism too. I don't think people view the practice of Kwanzaa the way it was viewed during segregated times. At least I don't think so, I don't even know anyone who does Kwanzaa. I think my kid's class sang a Christmas song about Kwanzaa in the Winter play.
  • I've been to a few Kwanza candle lightings/celebrations and I have to say, you both are wrong about the modern celebration of the season. Granted it was started by a black militant history professor (right here at Cal State Long Beach) in the 60's, but the season itself has nothing whatsoever to do with racism as it has to do with taking care of the community. The black power trip disappeared a long time ago!

    While the celebration was never meant to become permanent, it has and I say for the better. What a better thing is there to celebrate than taking care of your local community?

    Just so everyone understands, I am a middle class white male. While I know the season was not designed for me, the tenents work for everyone and were even more important in '66 when civil rights were just getting their beginning and it was espescially important for the black community to stick together and support each other, as in much of the country they weren't getting any support from the outside. One can probably make the same arguement today, in fact...
  • VulchorVulchor FloridaPosts: 4,601 ✭✭✭
    I dont disagree per se Brian------I am all for community. But in my comminuty, there are whites, blacks, asians, hispanics, ect. When I want good sushi, I go to a Japanese place (generally). Good southern BBQ, maybe the joint that the black family with the smoker owns. That is what I consider community. The Kwanzaa version of community (that again, I have only read) is about taking care of the black community. If I chose to only go to places that were owned and operated by whites----sure it would be my choice, but to say I was supporting my "community" would probably be a tough sell.
  • Vulchor:
    I dont disagree per se Brian------I am all for community. But in my comminuty, there are whites, blacks, asians, hispanics, ect. When I want good sushi, I go to a Japanese place (generally). Good southern BBQ, maybe the joint that the black family with the smoker owns. That is what I consider community. The Kwanzaa version of community (that again, I have only read) is about taking care of the black community. If I chose to only go to places that were owned and operated by whites----sure it would be my choice, but to say I was supporting my "community" would probably be a tough sell.


    Originally yes, it was all about supporting the black community because, like I said, in 1966 no one was. Just like you, my community is extremely mixed. On the right of me lives a Mexican family, on the right a black family, across the street is a Cambodian family and a gay couple lives next to them. Long Beach rocks that way!

    The modern take on Kwanza is to celebrate your community, no matter who it is. Like I said, that Black Power thing disappeared long ago for the most part.
  • stephen_hannibalstephen_hannibal Posts: 4,317
    Hippiebrian:
    ...The black power trip disappeared a long time ago!....
    BWA HA HA HA HA!!!!!!
    OMG!!!! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    OMG That was the funniest thing I have ever read.
    OK I'm a black guy and I just have to let you know you are wrong.

  • stephen_hannibal:
    Hippiebrian:
    ...The black power trip disappeared a long time ago!....
    BWA HA HA HA HA!!!!!!
    OMG!!!! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    OMG That was the funniest thing I have ever read.
    OK I'm a black guy and I just have to let you know you are wrong.



    Compared to the 70's? Come on, man, there are still a few militants around, but for the most part it's over.
  • denniskingdennisking Posts: 3,703 ✭✭✭
    Hippiebrian:
    stephen_hannibal:
    Hippiebrian:
    ...The black power trip disappeared a long time ago!....
    BWA HA HA HA HA!!!!!!
    OMG!!!! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    OMG That was the funniest thing I have ever read.
    OK I'm a black guy and I just have to let you know you are wrong.

    Compared to the 70's? Come on, man, there are still a few militants around, but for the most part it's over.
    maybe on the west coast bud, but the black population on the east coast and in the south are FAR different. hell, Stephen can't even tweet me in public back there.....
  • big chunksbig chunks Posts: 1,607
    Long Beach is cool, my brother lived out there and the bars are great but nothing beats roscoes chicken and waffles
  • big chunks:
    Long Beach is cool, my brother lived out there and the bars are great but nothing beats roscoes chicken and waffles



    mmmmmmmmm...Roscoes...........
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 4,049 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I've had the opportunity to ask only a few Africans, from different parts of Africa, how they celebrated Kwanza at home. None of them had any idea what I was talking about.
    "It is a simple matter to determine when a true genius has arrived on earth, all the dunces will convene to form a coalition against him."  --  Jonathon Swift

    Simple reductive logic reveals every "Zero Tolerance" policy to be, in fact, a "Zero Intelligence" policy.--Me

    A nation of sheep begets a government of wolves.  
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    HOW DO YOU CELEBRATE CHRISTMAHANUKKWANZAA?
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    wiki ------Maulana Karenga created Kwanzaa in 1966 as the first specifically African American holiday .[2] Karenga said his goal was to "give Blacks an alternative to the existing holiday and give Blacks an opportunity to celebrate themselves and history, rather than simply imitate the practice of the dominant society."
  • jr_p951jr_p951 Posts: 1,121
    Hippiebrian:
    I've been to a few Kwanza candle lightings/celebrations and I have to say, you both are wrong about the modern celebration of the season. Granted it was started by a black militant history professor (right here at Cal State Long Beach) in the 60's, but the season itself has nothing whatsoever to do with racism as it has to do with taking care of the community. The black power trip disappeared a long time ago! While the celebration was never meant to become permanent, it has and I say for the better. What a better thing is there to celebrate than taking care of your local community? Just so everyone understands, I am a middle class white male. While I know the season was not designed for me, the tenents work for everyone and were even more important in '66 when civil rights were just getting their beginning and it was espescially important for the black community to stick together and support each other, as in much of the country they weren't getting any support from the outside. One can probably make the same arguement today, in fact...
    Brian, I am not sure you understood what I wrote. I stated that it did start out one way but I don't think that people view Kwanzaa the way they did in the 60's. Click on the link and read for yourself. If you are meaning that I am wrong and that it is a racist holiday and people do still view it as an african american celebration that is an alternative to christmas and the thought Jesus is crazy...well I guess to each his own. BUT...I think you just read my post wrong.
  • VulchorVulchor FloridaPosts: 4,601 ✭✭✭
    Amos Umwhat:
    I've had the opportunity to ask only a few Africans, from different parts of Africa, how they celebrated Kwanza at home. None of them had any idea what I was talking about.
    Because its a fake a$$ racist holiday------I said it b!tches, lol.
  • denniskingdennisking Posts: 3,703 ✭✭✭
    Vulchor:
    Amos Umwhat:
    I've had the opportunity to ask only a few Africans, from different parts of Africa, how they celebrated Kwanza at home. None of them had any idea what I was talking about.
    Because its a fake a$$ racist holiday------I said it b!tches, lol.
    hahahaha
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