Home General Discussion
Options

For Alex; Question re: the Forum Blend

JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
While we are voting for the third longfiller leaf, could we also discuss the binder leaf, and how it will influence the cigar we are creating? I'd especially like to hear your analysis of the cigar we've built so far, and how our choice of binder leaf will influence what we've done.

Specifically, how do you think a Cameroon binder would affect the cigar we're making, as well as the Brazilian leaf used as wrapper for the San Lotano Habano. Also, if you were chosing the binder, what would it be?

Comments

  • Options
    ToombesToombes Posts: 4,506 ✭✭✭
    Excellent queries, David. Considering its a medium-full bodies blend so far, I'd like to know how these choices would affect the overall outcome. Huzzah, my friend.
  • Options
    The_KidThe_Kid Posts: 7,869 ✭✭✭
    Thanks JDH, thinkin of voting for a criollo binder or perhaps criollo filler,,
  • Options
    Alex_SvensonAlex_Svenson Posts: 1,224 ✭✭✭
    As I write this I am about a halfway through a bottle of Basel Haden so that is my disclaimer LOL. I had a hard day or working on some new tobacco and am enjoying a relaxing day with a few industry buddies. We are well on our way to greatness and your question is a great one. I must say that the wrapper selection alone by our group of seasoned aficionados here on the forum has set us up for huge success but now, as you guys have pointed out, it comes down to the details and details in blending are what it is all about. Unlike years past, I am taking a bit more control in the blending. That said, while the group is picking fillers, I am going to tweak the proportions of what is used and primings to achieve the desired result. Much like our community here has grown over the years, so have I and our team and our goal is to make our forum concoction something much greater. I even have such master blenders as AJ Fernandez and Nestor Plasencia consulting on our blend to help with primings and proportions to meet our expectations. That said, there are no guarantees but this time, I want to make sure we are as well positioned for greatness as we can be. I am even enlisting the help of Ramon Bueso who is a master blender you will no doubt be hearing a great deal about in the months to come.

    If you are asking for my humble opinion, it is that far too many people entering the blending arena get excited by unique or more exotic tobaccos and I hope it is something our community avoids. When we set out on our mission, I was so excited by the selection of Sumatra Ecaudor wrapper, especially high priming, that I could barrel contain myself. However, once I saw us drift into Ometepe filler, I started to grow concerned. So much of todays most unique tobacco is so exotic that while exciting, can be so overpowering that it can consume a blend in a one dimensional manner. Once we settled on condega for the next filler my hopes were renewed for complete success. I feared too many had bought into a marketing hype that is all too prevalent in our industry. I want to see how filler 3 shakes out, but i am confident that from here we can make a fantastic cigar.

    Cameroon binder or other sweet tobaccos are a possibility at this point but largely depends on where the last filler weighs in. For me, binder is best reserved for last. It is that pinch of salt that you add at the last minute that brings a cigar to its full fruition. So, you have asked me a bit of a loaded question. Our cigar now as it stands is an execellently complex, dry and full flavored smoke with everything from cedar to earthiness in the spectrum. I can't possible suggest an ideal binder until I know how the last filler shakes out. That said, knowing where we are now, I would not suggest something as radical as cameroon or Brazil. At this point, my sights would be dead set on Copan, Esteli or Jalapa. Once the decision was made for Ometepe as the first filler I knew we needed a core Cuban seed as a binder to round out what can be a very intense flavor such as that of ometepe.

    As always, the decision will rest in the hand of our members, but I can tell you when working with a core strength of earth tones and habano flavor, deviating into exotic territory cab be the fastest way to kill a blend. Cameroon and Brazil are both still on the table for certain but I can't say for certain until final votes are in on the last filler. Asking a chef what his hint of salt will be before the recipe is done is damn near impossible.
  • Options
    BigT06BigT06 Posts: 3,899
    Thanks for weighing in Alex! Your answers shed a lot of light.
  • Options
    ToombesToombes Posts: 4,506 ✭✭✭
    Wow! Tons of useful information in your answers, Alex. Damn, I'm proud to be a part of this and can't wait until this blend goes on the table.
  • Options
    JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
    Thank you Alex, for taking the time to provide exactly the kind of insight and analysis of our blend that I was hoping for. I WAS considering the use of a cameroon or brazilian leaf for the binder, but, thanks to your advice, I am going to look elsewhere; probably an Estili or Jalapa Cuban seed leaf.
  • Options
    xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    Much appreciated Alex; insights into blending a cigar like this are always appreciated, especially when one wrong choice can ruin an otherwise great cigar
Sign In or Register to comment.