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My Undercrown

y2pascoey2pascoe Posts: 1,727 ✭✭
Was smoky as hell this evening. It was emmitting what appeared to me as almost a violet shade of smoke. Anyone ever noticed this, or am I seeing things?

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    LeftFiveLeftFive Posts: 184 ✭✭
    I smoked one in my car last night and it reminded me of that scene from Cheech and Chong.
    Fantastically put-together cigar tho; felt great in the hand.
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    ImgemboImgembo Posts: 661 ✭✭
    Mine last week was the same.
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    KriegerKrieger Posts: 337
    ditto, or fresh LP9s. Smoke bombs, but it smells and tastes soooooo good!
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    kingdavid5kingdavid5 Posts: 293
    Every undercrown that I have smoked has been like that but they taste so good
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    ToombesToombes Posts: 4,506 ✭✭✭
    Finally had the opportunity to compare the Undercrown to the LP No 9. The LP9 didn't seem as smoky and I thought the Undercrown had a bit more flavorful.
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    JHeweyJHewey Posts: 2,421 ✭✭✭
    Toombes:
    Finally had the opportunity to compare the Undercrown to the LP No 9. The LP9 didn't seem as smoky and I thought the Undercrown had a bit more flavorful.
    Idk if you can really compare those two. But anyway. Did the LP9 have any age on it?
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    mannishmannish Posts: 6
    yep it deterred from the experience for me.  

    y2pascoe:
    Was smoky as hell this evening. It was emmitting what appeared to me as almost a violet shade of smoke. Anyone ever noticed this, or am I seeing things?
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    ToombesToombes Posts: 4,506 ✭✭✭
    JHewey:
    Toombes:
    Finally had the opportunity to compare the Undercrown to the LP No 9. The LP9 didn't seem as smoky and I thought the Undercrown had a bit more flavorful.
    Idk if you can really compare those two. But anyway. Did the LP9 have any age on it?

    Not sure on the age, it was gifted to me. I've got two more in the humi so I'm gonna give them as much time as I can to age and then have another go at it.
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    stowggiestowggie Posts: 399
    Toombes:
    JHewey:
    Toombes:
    Finally had the opportunity to compare the Undercrown to the LP No 9. The LP9 didn't seem as smoky and I thought the Undercrown had a bit more flavorful.
    Idk if you can really compare those two. But anyway. Did the LP9 have any age on it?

    Not sure on the age, it was gifted to me. I've got two more in the humi so I'm gonna give them as much time as I can to age and then have another go at it.
    Not sure if you smoked the one I sent ya but it's from sept of 2011 just FYI.
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    ToombesToombes Posts: 4,506 ✭✭✭
    Pretty sure it was. So now I have my answer... Thanks, stowggie!
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    VulchorVulchor Posts: 4,848 ✭✭✭✭
    These f*ckers are so smoky I wont do them unless I am in an open field. I think the sticks are ok, but they smoke so much to me that I consider it a turn off I am sad to say.
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    ToombesToombes Posts: 4,506 ✭✭✭
    Vulchor:
    These f*ckers are so smoky I wont do them unless I am in an open field. I think the sticks are ok, but they smoke so much to me that I consider it a turn off I am sad to say.

    The first Undercrown I smoked, I used as a smoke signal to help land a helicopter for a scene flight... Not really, but it sounded good.
    They do have an immense amount of resting smoke. The LP9 I smoked Friday night wasn't as bad and the Gurkha Centurian I smoked earlier this afternoon had quite a bit as well.
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    docbp87docbp87 Posts: 3,521
    Has to do with the way Ligas (and now Undercrown) are rolled. Saka has written up lengthy explanations on several forums. If I run across it I'll copy and paste here.
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    kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,633 ✭✭✭✭
    docbp87:
    Has to do with the way Ligas (and now Undercrown) are rolled. Saka has written up lengthy explanations on several forums. If I run across it I'll copy and paste here.
    i was talking about that in my catalog when i did my review of the ratzilla: CLICK



    i hope that helps

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    oldsoulrevivaloldsoulrevival Posts: 632 ✭✭
    Prepare to get learned on some science.

    When smoke comes off the end of your cigar, there is very little moisture in it because it's so hot at the tip. And when there is very little moisture in the smoke, there is less filtration of the incoming light rays. What this means is that blue frequencies are still able to be seen by your eyes because there is nothing in the smoke filtering it out. However, once you inhale the smoke, or pull it into your mouth, you introduce a LOT of moisture to the smoke with your natural bodily fluids, so when you exhale, your smoke will be white because the water droplets in the smoke have scattered all of the light waves and the result is a combination of the colors.

    This is the same reason that we have beautiful sunsets. As the sun sets over the horizon, the light has to travel through more and more "stuff" (ie - atmosphere), which isn't only made up of water, and as the light travels through, much of the atmosphere filters out the colors of the spectrum, and since reds and oranges are the most intense wave lengths, they are able to make it through all of the atmospheric filtration. This is also why cities with the most pollution have the most beautiful sunsets - their pollution filters even more light out, leaving you with very intense shades of red and orange.
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    y2pascoey2pascoe Posts: 1,727 ✭✭
    oldsoulrevival:
    Prepare to get learned on some science.

    When smoke comes off the end of your cigar, there is very little moisture in it because it's so hot at the tip. And when there is very little moisture in the smoke, there is less filtration of the incoming light rays. What this means is that blue frequencies are still able to be seen by your eyes because there is nothing in the smoke filtering it out. However, once you inhale the smoke, or pull it into your mouth, you introduce a LOT of moisture to the smoke with your natural bodily fluids, so when you exhale, your smoke will be white because the water droplets in the smoke have scattered all of the light waves and the result is a combination of the colors.

    This is the same reason that we have beautiful sunsets. As the sun sets over the horizon, the light has to travel through more and more "stuff" (ie - atmosphere), which isn't only made up of water, and as the light travels through, much of the atmosphere filters out the colors of the spectrum, and since reds and oranges are the most intense wave lengths, they are able to make it through all of the atmospheric filtration. This is also why cities with the most pollution have the most beautiful sunsets - their pollution filters even more light out, leaving you with very intense shades of red and orange.
    Science....I should have known.
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