jump in the deep end?

webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 5,563 ✭✭✭✭✭
So I am wondering if a roll-your-own project might be just the ticket for a noob, in a sort of a throw them in the deep end and they'll learn how to swim kinda way.

The pros are: In just a few batches I would start to get a feel for different kinds of leaf. The cost is fairly negligible. That tobacco leaf site sells sampler batches, so I could easily try different blends. I'd know what a leaf is. I sure learned plenty about beer by brewing.

The cons are: I'd be rolling some knobby cheroots to start, and good construction is an important part of my enjoyment. Any stab in the dark blend would require six months or so before I would see true results. I'm sure I'd not get the quality leaf that a good house would get, so I might decide I don't like X when it's not X's fault; it's just my low grade version of X.

I'm really inclined to do it. A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a handful is the real deal.

Whattaya think, kuzi? Would I just be letting my bulldog mouth bite off more than my chihuahua ass can shake? Or is this a good way for a noob to get to know tabac?

“It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


Comments

  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭✭
    probably wouldnt hurt. could learn a ton from it.
    in fact you would actually learn about what has peaked my interest for a while now: How construction effects burn and ultimately flavor.

    if it were me i would take at least a little bit of time developing your palate first. how do you know where to start if you dont know where you want to finish?
    and watch out for Stockholm Cigar syndrome where you would fall in love with your own bad product.

  • Ken_LightKen_Light Posts: 3,539 ✭✭✭
    webmost:
    So I am wondering if a roll-your-own project might be just the ticket for a noob, in a sort of a throw them in the deep end and they'll learn how to swim kinda way.

    The pros are: In just a few batches I would start to get a feel for different kinds of leaf. The cost is fairly negligible. That tobacco leaf site sells sampler batches, so I could easily try different blends. I'd know what a leaf is. I sure learned plenty about beer by brewing.

    The cons are: I'd be rolling some knobby cheroots to start, and good construction is an important part of my enjoyment. Any stab in the dark blend would require six months or so before I would see true results. I'm sure I'd not get the quality leaf that a good house would get, so I might decide I don't like X when it's not X's fault; it's just my low grade version of X.

    I'm really inclined to do it. A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a handful is the real deal.

    Whattaya think, kuzi? Would I just be letting my bulldog mouth bite off more than my chihuahua ass can shake? Or is this a good way for a noob to get to know tabac?

    If you got the time and resources, I'd say go for it. What's the worst that can happen? You learn how to make fake cuban labels and make lots of money? hahahahaha i kid...

    Not to derail, but do you brew all-grain or extract? I've been 50/50'ing it for a while and am looking to move into all-grain.
    ^Troll: DO NOT FEED.
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 5,563 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Both very excellent points as always, kuz. In response to which:

    1) I am 64. Don't know that I have years enough left to adequately develop a "palate". Looking for shortcuts.
    2) I'll take Stockholm under advisement. I know just what you mean. Been there, bragged about that.

    I'll have to seriously sleep on this. I like it.

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 5,563 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Ken, I've done both ways. The extract is so much easier there's no comparison. And I don't see that the diff warrants all the extra mess. Haven't brewed for several years now. Two probs: 1) Cannot get good water here in Dull-Aware. Have to run to Pennsyltucky and find a spring. My old spring dried up last I looked. 2) I don't drink enough to whack a batch any more. Ought to give more parties, I suppose. Couple fine micros here in Dull-Aware. Wonder where they get their water? Once you get your anklet off, spin across the bridge from Joisey and we can go score a growler at the Iron Hill Brew Pub.

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • DirewolfDirewolf Posts: 3,493
    You can make some damn fine beers using DME specialty grains. I like all grain myself , but not afraid to brew with liquid or dry malt extract
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