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olivia v series

Ok guys I am newer to cigars and really didnt start to appreciate them till recently. I have never smoked bad cigars, one of my first true cigar loves was the padron 64. My friend and I both bought a box that disappeared very fast. I believe my first cigar was a monticristo white. I have been only smoking for around a year and a half and have some interesting cigars under my belt. But the down side is I still cant really pick up on flavors and accents very well. Yesterday was the start on my treck to mastering cigars. I bought an olivia v series and an onyx reserve from my shop. The olivia v was very smooth, and came off nutty to me which is probably wrong. Most people said it was peperry. I worked at starbucks for awhile and what they consider nutty coffee taste just like this cigar. I had issues with it though it just randomly burnt out three or four times? I was burning pretty evenly but just wouldnt stay lit. I was puffing roughly once a min. Do you think the weather could have affected this? It was about 40 degrees outside and very wet. I was in my garage smoking. Also how should I develope my palate

Comments

  • betasynnbetasynn Posts: 1,249
    Somebody else totally said this, so feel free to take credit for your words, but the best thing to do is read the reviews of established afficianados, see what they say a cigar tastes like, go out and buy something with that flavor and also buy the cigar (IE if they say it has nutty flavor, buy nuts; if they say it tastes like pepper, taste pepper.) Taste the cigar and the food and see where the similarities lay. However; don't be afraid to say you taste a flavor if you think you taste it; it's important to give a thorough, honest opinion.
  • 405bench405bench Posts: 36
    I've been smoking premium cigars for 30 yrs and I can't define anything beyond "I like it" or "I don't like it".   It is frustrating because I read with envy the reviews by people that can distinguish various "tastes" and I simply can't do it.  Probably for the same reason I love spicy foods and Asian/Thai  spices.  Dull (abused?) taste buds. 
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭✭
    betasynn:
    Somebody else totally said this, so feel free to take credit for your words, but the best thing to do is read the reviews of established afficianados, see what they say a cigar tastes like, go out and buy something with that flavor and also buy the cigar (IE if they say it has nutty flavor, buy nuts; if they say it tastes like pepper, taste pepper.) Taste the cigar and the food and see where the similarities lay. However; don't be afraid to say you taste a flavor if you think you taste it; it's important to give a thorough, honest opinion.
    and
    405bench:
    I've been smoking premium cigars for 30 yrs and I can't define anything beyond "I like it" or "I don't like it".   It is frustrating because I read with envy the reviews by people that can distinguish various "tastes" and I simply can't do it.  Probably for the same reason I love spicy foods and Asian/Thai  spices.  Dull (abused?) taste buds. 
    read my developing your palate thread in my signature.

    and

    i keep a catalog of all my cigars (also found in my signature). I started this catalog when i first started smoking cigars. the entire purpose of it was to help me understand cigars more. It has helped more than i can really explain. I recommend that you do keep a catalog as well, and please read and comment on both the developing your palate thread and in my catalog. I want both to be used as a tool to help you enjoy cigars as much as you can.
  • Matt MarvelMatt Marvel Posts: 930
    Regarding your question about developing your palate, here's a pretty good guide set-up by our very own kuzi.
    http://www.cigar.com/cs/forums/thread/11121.aspx EDIT: Nevermind, kuzi beat me to it, lol.
  • Alex_SvensonAlex_Svenson Moderator Posts: 1,224 admin
    If I might throw in my own two cents and also tie it in to a some stories about my time in Central America, I think it might shed some light on this.

    The truth behind tasting is that tobacco has no flavor, well it does, but its flavor is tobacco. You palate is made up of 4 regions that each have different sensors, sweet, bitter, acid and salt. If you explore the cigar.com newsletters you can find some articles about this. The flavor you get is really what your palate picks up when interacting with the smoke and tobacco. So the reality is, that there are only 4 real flavors that everyone should pick up on. No matter your platate, as long as you are smoking the same cigar, everyone should agree on what regions the the smoke is activating.

    The actual detection of things like nuts, wood, cedar, cocoa, espresso, coffee, chocolate, earth, peat, etc etc are subjective by person. I have never seen two people smoke a cigar and pick up on the exact same things.

    So while everyone smoke the same cigar and agree that is sweet with some acidic qualities, the specific tasting notes should vary. Dont get me wrong, you may see many similarities in specific flavors between smokers, but for the most part it depends on the user.

    In my time with many of the worlds foremost blenders and tobacco men, all of them will tell you that tobacco tastes like tobacco. When they discuss extra flavors, they always pick very natural elements like spice, leather, wood, earth, espresso. My point is, dont break your neck trying to detect notes of celery and marmalade or other stuff that frankly sounds awful in a cigar.

    I remember a few years ago I was visiting a well known maker in Danli Honduras (who will remain unnamed) and a gringo came in who was with some sort of mission trip to build a school. Within the first 5 minutes, I picked up on the fact that he was still a newer cigar smoker (which does not bother me, I thought it was great he took the time to see a factory), but his attitude was terrible. He was going on and on as if he had been smoking his whole life, criticizing various brands and showing no real respect for anyone. Anyone who has spent any time in Latin America will tell you that people are for the most part patient and I was amazed the owner of this factory showed restraint and continued to be the best host he could. Finally, the visitor picked up a cigar up of the table that was offered by the maker The maker asked, "please tell me what you think of this, it is a new project". The guy lit it up and said, not bad but Ive had better, I detect strong notes of celery and construction paper. With that, the owner could not hold it in any longer, he burst out laughing uncontollably and frankly I did too. The guy felt pretty stupid but his crapy attitude negated any sympathy I might have had.
  • Matt MarvelMatt Marvel Posts: 930
    I've run into several people who have attitudes like that, on different subjects. They talk a big talk and are about as rude as they can be with their 'knowledge'. In the end, they always end up with egg on their face. I'll admit, it is a little satisfying to see it when it happens.
  • Alex_SvensonAlex_Svenson Moderator Posts: 1,224 admin
    Matt Marvel:
    I've run into several people who have attitudes like that, on different subjects. They talk a big talk and are about as rude as they can be with their 'knowledge'. In the end, they always end up with egg on their face. I'll admit, it is a little satisfying to see it when it happens.
    My dad left me with some good advice. He said, "son if you have to tell someone you are smart, tough, rich or powerful, then you aren't."
  • Matt MarvelMatt Marvel Posts: 930
    Alex Svenson:
    Matt Marvel:
    I've run into several people who have attitudes like that, on different subjects. They talk a big talk and are about as rude as they can be with their 'knowledge'. In the end, they always end up with egg on their face. I'll admit, it is a little satisfying to see it when it happens.
    My dad left me with some good advice. He said, "son if you have to tell someone you are smart, tough, rich or powerful, then you aren't."
    Couldn't agree with that more. You know, that guy could've really learned a lot from seasoned vets if he had just shut up and listened. Instead he made a fool of himself. Some people just don't know how to heed that advice.
  • OK I am going to read all kuzi's articles tonight. I have also been keeping track of every cigar and what I think about it and what I tasted. I dont know if I will ever become a master of picking everything in a cigar up but I certainly will continue to smoke them.
  • kaspera79kaspera79 Posts: 7,259 ✭✭✭
    betasynn:
    Somebody else totally said this, so feel free to take credit for your words, but the best thing to do is read the reviews of established afficianados, see what they say a cigar tastes like, go out and buy something with that flavor and also buy the cigar (IE if they say it has nutty flavor, buy nuts; if they say it tastes like pepper, taste pepper.) Taste the cigar and the food and see where the similarities lay. However; don't be afraid to say you taste a flavor if you think you taste it; it's important to give a thorough, honest opinion.
    That sound like a Kuzi-ism to me.. But a great way to develop the taste comparison you are looking for.
  • j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403
    Alex Svenson:
    Matt Marvel:
    I've run into several people who have attitudes like that, on different subjects. They talk a big talk and are about as rude as they can be with their 'knowledge'. In the end, they always end up with egg on their face. I'll admit, it is a little satisfying to see it when it happens.
    My dad left me with some good advice. He said, "son if you have to tell someone you are smart, tough, rich or powerful, then you aren't."
    Words to live by.
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