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Get home from work trip and notice a sound coming from wife's car. Take it to dealer and they say the oil pressure is dropping. Nothing they can do except replace the whole engine. My first thought was the oil pump faulty? Apparantly it's a problem in the block but I don't understand how that can be determined. Getting a second opinion tomorrow. There have been no warning signs, it's regularly maintained and before this the engine sounded like it did when it was brand new. 2003 Ford Explorer with 164625 miles. Any technical advice much appreciated.
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Well, if the pump failed, then bearing damage has occurred and possible cylinder wall and piston damage.
    Without taking actual oil pressure readings with a mechanical gauge (pulling the oil pressure sensor and installing a mechanical gauge), it's hard to say. But if it had a lower end noise, then it's likely the bearings are toast and other damage has occurred.

    But, did the dash oil pressure gauge drop? Did the oil light come on?
    If not, the noise could be from a bad harmonic balancer/crank pulley, loose torque converter or flexplate bolts or a cracked flexplate.

    Was the noise loud, like someone tapping on the engine with a hammer? Or soft, like a loud clock ticking?
    Did the noise get louder at an idle or under heavy load? Did it go away at cruising speeds or get louder?

    Getting a second opinion is the best thing you can do right now. And what ever you do, don't tell the new shop what the other shop said. All you will do then is put the thought into their head. Have them do proper diagnosis to determine where the problem really is.

    Did they pull the oil filter? If they did, they should be able to open it up, pull the filter element and lay it out and see if there is metal in the pleats. If there is, then yes, you have a serious internal problem.

    Without seeing it and hearing the noise, it is really difficult to come up with things to focus on.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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    taythegibstaythegibs Posts: 2,025
    In my (limited) experience it is somewhat rare that an engine needs to be fully replaced while it is still driveable, I would definitely look for a second opinion, it seems like many mechanics are out there just to make a quick buck What does the noise sound like? was the oil low? was there anything in the oil?

    unfortunately since it is the oil pressure it can be effected by many many things main bearing, timing chain, gaskets, oil pump, etc
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    j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403 ✭✭
    James, did you try hitting it with a hammer? If yes and that didn't work, did you try a bigger hammer? I've found that there are very few problems in life that can't be solved by whacking them with a hammer. Big Smile [:D]

    Sorry, I'm all dressed up with nowhere to go and boy am I bored.
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Clarify, did YOU see the oil pressure drop or is that what the dealer is saying?
    Have you started the vehicle since they made their diagnosis? And what does the dash oil pressure gauge say?

    Did they check the fan clutch to see if it wasn't making noise? A fan hub that has bearing failure will allow the fan blades to clip the fan shroud and make considerable noise.
    What does the oil look like? Is it black, fairly clean looking or milky color? Knowing some of these answers may help.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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    Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat Posts: 8,528 ✭✭✭✭✭
    0patience:
    Clarify, did YOU see the oil pressure drop or is that what the dealer is saying?
    Have you started the vehicle since they made their diagnosis? And what does the dash oil pressure gauge say?

    Did they check the fan clutch to see if it wasn't making noise? A fan hub that has bearing failure will allow the fan blades to clip the fan shroud and make considerable noise.
    What does the oil look like? Is it black, fairly clean looking or milky color? Knowing some of these answers may help.
    Good advice, always check it out yourself as much as possible.

    This reminds me of something that happened to a car of mine once. Got home after working out of town all week, usually only had time with the family on Sundays back then, went for a drive to the lake, car makes noise, shudders to a stop. Got out, checked under the hood, found NO oil on the dipstick. I asked my (first) wife: "Has it been leaking oil?"

    Her reply: "Well, it was, but it stopped so I thought it fixed itself" :(
    Hope your story turns out better.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "If you do not read the newspapers you're uninformed.  If you do read the newspapers, you're misinformed." --  Mark Twain
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    [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 3,917
    Thanks for the help.
    There are no check engine lights, oil looks fine on the dash, nothing to indicate a problem besides the noise. I have not had a chance to look at the engine itself. I'm good at minor repairs but not a wrench head. It makes this noise when first starting, driving, and I believe until you turn it off. The dealer did say they saw the oil pressure drop from 21 to 19 psi. I dropped I off at another place and only told them it was making a noise and will let them figure it out.

    The dealer didn't offer any evidence the engine was bad, just that it needed to be replaced. I asked about the oil pump and whether it was bad and they didn't really answer yes or no. I'm hoping that they were just being lazy and didn't want to really take apart the engine to see where the problem was and figured I would just buy a new engine. Crossing my fingers. The dealer wanted $5400.
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    jlmartajlmarta Posts: 7,881 ✭✭✭✭✭
    FYI, it's always been my experience that having a dealer work on your car is the most expensive way to go. Ask your friends, neighbors, etc, for a reference to a mechanic they trust - but not a dealer.
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    taythegibstaythegibs Posts: 2,025
    Good to hear that you are getting a second opinion...that estimate would of had me running for the hills (i only paid $5,000 for my 00' Jeep Cherokee...)

    Amos Umwhat:
    0patience:
    Clarify, did YOU see the oil pressure drop or is that what the dealer is saying?
    Have you started the vehicle since they made their diagnosis? And what does the dash oil pressure gauge say?

    Did they check the fan clutch to see if it wasn't making noise? A fan hub that has bearing failure will allow the fan blades to clip the fan shroud and make considerable noise.
    What does the oil look like? Is it black, fairly clean looking or milky color? Knowing some of these answers may help.
    Good advice, always check it out yourself as much as possible.

    This reminds me of something that happened to a car of mine once. Got home after working out of town all week, usually only had time with the family on Sundays back then, went for a drive to the lake, car makes noise, shudders to a stop. Got out, checked under the hood, found NO oil on the dipstick. I asked my (first) wife: "Has it been leaking oil?"

    Her reply: "Well, it was, but it stopped so I thought it fixed itself" :(
    Hope your story turns out better.
    My Girlfriend's whole family is like that, by the time a car is 6 year old they have to trade it in, it will be nearly dead. Somehow they can justify spending to get a fully loaded escape but not spend the money on fixing their horridly rutted driveway that they have had to have their cars suspensions fixed due to.... *grumble* *grumble* *grumble* Her dad freaked out when we made the Florida-Ohio roadtrip in a 1998 GMC Suburban that had 180k+ on it, he couldn't understand how it was still going.
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    james40:
    Thanks for the help.
    There are no check engine lights, oil looks fine on the dash, nothing to indicate a problem besides the noise. I have not had a chance to look at the engine itself. I'm good at minor repairs but not a wrench head. It makes this noise when first starting, driving, and I believe until you turn it off. The dealer did say they saw the oil pressure drop from 21 to 19 psi. I dropped I off at another place and only told them it was making a noise and will let them figure it out.

    The dealer didn't offer any evidence the engine was bad, just that it needed to be replaced. I asked about the oil pump and whether it was bad and they didn't really answer yes or no. I'm hoping that they were just being lazy and didn't want to really take apart the engine to see where the problem was and figured I would just buy a new engine. Crossing my fingers. The dealer wanted $5400.
    21 psi to 19 psi is NOT, I repeat, NOT a drop. Seriously? That is well with in Ford's specifications.

    I cannot stress enough how much you need a second opinion from a reliable shop.
    Your problem does not sound like an internal problem, from what you've said. It is possible, but from the info you have given, I doubt it.

    I checked with my mechanics group to see if they have any recommendations for shops or if any of them are in your area and one of them recommended checking with Ted's Garage or Becka Automotive in Chula Vista.
    I can't vouch for them, as this came from another mechanic in the LA area.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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    xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    I hate to piggyback on your thread, but I've got a similar problem; this has only happened once, but while driving around 30mph, my car (which has an electronic dash) flashed "Check oil levels" and thereafter the engine died - while I was on the road. Pulled over, cranked the engine about 5 times, then it started up after the fifth try, and I drove home without incident, even taking the highway and getting up to 90mph. The only time anything close has happened was after I went to the dealership to get my AC fixed; on the ride home, my oil gauge suddenly flatlined and my dash was flashing "check oil levels" - car was still running fine, but I pulled over, and checked the dipstick and the level was fine.

    Any opinions would be welcome, and I'd like to ask a second question - how much is too much to replace sagging engine mounts?

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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Mostly need to know what the vehicle it is (year, make, model and engine).

    But for the most part, it sounds more like an electrical problem. Which could be a sensor, the wiring or a relay.
    Most 2000-up vehicles, in general have a low oil pressure shut down on them. If the sensor "sees" low oil pressure, it will generally signal the computer to shut the engine down to prevent damage to the engine. Which is one reason that Jame's problem doesn't match the diagnosis from the dealer.
    So, if the sensor has a problem or the signal wire or ground has an issue, it can cause intermittent problems, such as the one you are running into.

    Generally, when this happens, it will store a fault code. (Not always, which can become a royal pain if there are no fault codes)
    If you can have the fault codes/trouble codes read and get the number (it will be something like P0100-P1900), which some auto parts stores, such as Autozone offer a free code reading and print out, then we may be able to see if it is a computer issue or a circuit problem.

    But what YOU can do is check that the battery connections are clean and tight. Newer vehicles are real particular about good grounds. They tend to get pissy when the grounds aren't clean and tight.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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    denniskingdennisking Posts: 3,703 ✭✭✭
    There are service bulletins for spark knock on the 4.0 and 4.6 that can be fixed using the Ford supplied PM3 chemical for decarbon purposes. I've personally heard those motors make that noise at higher miles. I would make sure that's not the case first. I've only had those motors fail from neglect or oil pump failure. If your pump failed, you should have less pressure at idle than 19 since spec is 15psi at 2000rpm.
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    james40:
    2003 Ford Explorer with 164625 miles. Any technical advice much appreciated.
    After thinking on this for a bit and taking a better look at your post, the mileage would make me think that you could possibly have a timing chain problem.
    If the timing chain has never been replaced, after a while, the chain stretches. Like a bicycle chain.
    There are rub pads in the timing chain cover/housing that, for lack of a better term, guide the chain and a tensioner that is supposed to keep the chain taught.

    What happens is that the tensioner may fail or the rub blocks get worn away and the chain "slaps" the timing chain cover.

    Any good shop will be able to narrow it down fairly quickly. If the noise is coming from the forward part of the engine, suspect the timing chain or the fan hub. If it is coming from under the vehicle, suspect either the flywheel/torque converter.
    Was the engine temp higher than normal? Or did it maintain the temp in the normal range?
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
  • Options
    [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 3,917
    0patience:
    james40:
    2003 Ford Explorer with 164625 miles. Any technical advice much appreciated.
    After thinking on this for a bit and taking a better look at your post, the mileage would make me think that you could possibly have a timing chain problem.
    If the timing chain has never been replaced, after a while, the chain stretches. Like a bicycle chain.
    There are rub pads in the timing chain cover/housing that, for lack of a better term, guide the chain and a tensioner that is supposed to keep the chain taught.

    What happens is that the tensioner may fail or the rub blocks get worn away and the chain "slaps" the timing chain cover.

    Any good shop will be able to narrow it down fairly quickly. If the noise is coming from the forward part of the engine, suspect the timing chain or the fan hub. If it is coming from under the vehicle, suspect either the flywheel/torque converter.
    Was the engine temp higher than normal? Or did it maintain the temp in the normal range?

    the noise I heard sounded like a belt issue - its not metal on metal. The dealership said the noise was caused by the dropping oil pressure messing up the timing belt. They haven't found anything yet as it didn't make te noise when I dropped it off. Thanks so much for the help so far.
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    james40:
    the noise I heard sounded like a belt issue - its not metal on metal. The dealership said the noise was caused by the dropping oil pressure messing up the timing belt. They haven't found anything yet as it didn't make te noise when I dropped it off. Thanks so much for the help so far.
    Good grief! Get your vehicle out of there. Run, don't walk, away from that dealership. Your engine doesn't have a timing belt. It is a chain and if THEY don't know that, I'd be afraid. Very afraid. That is just messed up.

    If it sounds like a belt, then it could be that the belt tensioner has a problem. Ford updated the tensioners on those engines a few years back, so it wouldn't surprise me. With the engine running, there is one pulley that has a square hole in the arm of it for a ratchet to go into. If that pulley is bouncing when the engine is running, then the pulley has a problem and will cause the belt to make noise. Whether that is actually the problem or not, I don't know.

    Let me ask you this, was it raining on the day it made this noise?
    If it was, then yeah, it is possible that the belt itself was making the noise.

    Noise problems are always hard to figure out, especially from written words, cause it often takes a while to get all the information about what is going on.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
  • Options
    denniskingdennisking Posts: 3,703 ✭✭✭
    0patience:
    james40:
    2003 Ford Explorer with 164625 miles. Any technical advice much appreciated.
    After thinking on this for a bit and taking a better look at your post, the mileage would make me think that you could possibly have a timing chain problem.
    If the timing chain has never been replaced, after a while, the chain stretches. Like a bicycle chain.
    There are rub pads in the timing chain cover/housing that, for lack of a better term, guide the chain and a tensioner that is supposed to keep the chain taught.

    What happens is that the tensioner may fail or the rub blocks get worn away and the chain "slaps" the timing chain cover.

    Any good shop will be able to narrow it down fairly quickly. If the noise is coming from the forward part of the engine, suspect the timing chain or the fan hub. If it is coming from under the vehicle, suspect either the flywheel/torque converter.
    Was the engine temp higher than normal? Or did it maintain the temp in the normal range?
    forgot about this. The 4.0 SOHC is a good motor but I did see a timing chain tensioner or two fail when I was at Ford. I think 0patience is on the right track. If it's a 4.6 Explorer, it's also a chain but they are both on the front of the engine so the labor is a little more straightforward. I think 0patience is on the right track.
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    [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 3,917
    dennisking:
    0patience:
    james40:
    2003 Ford Explorer with 164625 miles. Any technical advice much appreciated.
    After thinking on this for a bit and taking a better look at your post, the mileage would make me think that you could possibly have a timing chain problem.
    If the timing chain has never been replaced, after a while, the chain stretches. Like a bicycle chain.
    There are rub pads in the timing chain cover/housing that, for lack of a better term, guide the chain and a tensioner that is supposed to keep the chain taught.

    What happens is that the tensioner may fail or the rub blocks get worn away and the chain "slaps" the timing chain cover.

    Any good shop will be able to narrow it down fairly quickly. If the noise is coming from the forward part of the engine, suspect the timing chain or the fan hub. If it is coming from under the vehicle, suspect either the flywheel/torque converter.
    Was the engine temp higher than normal? Or did it maintain the temp in the normal range?
    forgot about this. The 4.0 SOHC is a good motor but I did see a timing chain tensioner or two fail when I was at Ford. I think 0patience is on the right track. If it's a 4.6 Explorer, it's also a chain but they are both on the front of the engine so the labor is a little more straightforward. I think 0patience is on the right track.
    thanks fellas. No, it was not raining but I have it at a good shop now and just awaiting their diagnosis. I had a feeling the dealer was trying to sucker me so im glad I got a second opinion. It's amazing to me you guys can come to these conclusions from a forum post. Awesome stuff. It's the V6, which I think is the 4.0. If you guys are right about this, you get a special treat.
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    The_KidThe_Kid Posts: 7,869 ✭✭✭
    0patience:
    james40:
    2003 Ford Explorer with 164625 miles. Any technical advice much appreciated.
    After thinking on this for a bit and taking a better look at your post, the mileage would make me think that you could possibly have a timing chain problem.
    If the timing chain has never been replaced, after a while, the chain stretches. Like a bicycle chain.
    There are rub pads in the timing chain cover/housing that, for lack of a better term, guide the chain and a tensioner that is supposed to keep the chain taught.

    What happens is that the tensioner may fail or the rub blocks get worn away and the chain "slaps" the timing chain cover.

    Any good shop will be able to narrow it down fairly quickly. If the noise is coming from the forward part of the engine, suspect the timing chain or the fan hub. If it is coming from under the vehicle, suspect either the flywheel/torque converter.
    Was the engine temp higher than normal? Or did it maintain the temp in the normal range?
    +1 ,, if you replace the chain, replace the sprocket too,,
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    Roberto99Roberto99 Posts: 1,077
    I am totally impressed with this thread! So much so, I have to ask a question for the mechanics here. I have an '01 V8 Tundra LE and on an oil change they noticed the oil pressure gauge fluctuating. When the engine is first started the needle on the gauge goes slightly above 1/2 on the gauge (sorry no pressures on the gauge). It will stay there for several minutes regardless of engine speed. After that however when the engine idles the oil pressure gauge drops to well below 1/4 to near zero on the gauge but then when driving and the engine speed increases the gauge level increases back up to 1/2. I brought it to a garage who couldn't figure it out and they said it was worth trying a new sensor since they were inexpensive. With the new sensor it behaves the same as before.

    So my question is; is this normal behavior for this engine? I didn't notice it acting that way when it was new. Now it has about 115k miles on it. I had the major maintenance at 90k which also changed the timing belt. The engine runs like a top and sounds fine. The check engine light comes on but not for low oil pressure, I think the mechanic said it was coming on for a O2 sensor. I've actually been driving it this way for the last 6mo. not too concerned about it, as neither of the shops I went to seemed too concerned either. Should I be concerned?
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    xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    0patience:
    Mostly need to know what the vehicle it is (year, make, model and engine).

    But for the most part, it sounds more like an electrical problem. Which could be a sensor, the wiring or a relay.
    Most 2000-up vehicles, in general have a low oil pressure shut down on them. If the sensor "sees" low oil pressure, it will generally signal the computer to shut the engine down to prevent damage to the engine. Which is one reason that Jame's problem doesn't match the diagnosis from the dealer.
    So, if the sensor has a problem or the signal wire or ground has an issue, it can cause intermittent problems, such as the one you are running into.

    Generally, when this happens, it will store a fault code. (Not always, which can become a royal pain if there are no fault codes)
    If you can have the fault codes/trouble codes read and get the number (it will be something like P0100-P1900), which some auto parts stores, such as Autozone offer a free code reading and print out, then we may be able to see if it is a computer issue or a circuit problem.

    But what YOU can do is check that the battery connections are clean and tight. Newer vehicles are real particular about good grounds. They tend to get pissy when the grounds aren't clean and tight.
    1991 Porsche 928; engine is a 8-cyl, M 28.42 if it makes any difference; thanks for the help!! I've got an appt to get some new tires put on on Tues, guess I'll ask them to take a look
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    denniskingdennisking Posts: 3,703 ✭✭✭
    Roberto-

    I had a client with a Toyota Land Cruiser with the same problem. Turns out, the oil pressure sensor on that vehicle worked on resistance. There was corrosion on the connector and it was fluctuating the same exact way. Cleaned the connector and terminal on the sensor and all was okay. Check that out first.
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    Roberto99Roberto99 Posts: 1,077
    dennisking:
    Roberto-

    I had a client with a Toyota Land Cruiser with the same problem. Turns out, the oil pressure sensor on that vehicle worked on resistance. There was corrosion on the connector and it was fluctuating the same exact way. Cleaned the connector and terminal on the sensor and all was okay. Check that out first.
    Thanks alot Dennis. Corrosion problem makes alot of sense on my truck. I will have that checked.
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    dennisking:
    Roberto-

    I had a client with a Toyota Land Cruiser with the same problem. Turns out, the oil pressure sensor on that vehicle worked on resistance. There was corrosion on the connector and it was fluctuating the same exact way. Cleaned the connector and terminal on the sensor and all was okay. Check that out first.
    +1!
    We see this a lot on the Ford F series trucks.
    But if it continues to be a concern, they can hook up a mechanical gauge and verify it.
    One of the first tests I perform when there is an oil pressure concern is to remove the oil pressure sensor and install a hose with a mechanical oil pressure gauge on it and see what the "true" oil pressure is. If the mechanical gauge shows no problem, then it is is in the sensor or circuit.

    One thing to remember on electrical dash gauges, they are NEVER accurate. The give a "baseline".

    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
  • Options
    Roberto99Roberto99 Posts: 1,077
    0patience:
    dennisking:
    Roberto-

    I had a client with a Toyota Land Cruiser with the same problem. Turns out, the oil pressure sensor on that vehicle worked on resistance. There was corrosion on the connector and it was fluctuating the same exact way. Cleaned the connector and terminal on the sensor and all was okay. Check that out first.
    +1!
    We see this a lot on the Ford F series trucks.
    But if it continues to be a concern, they can hook up a mechanical gauge and verify it.
    One of the first tests I perform when there is an oil pressure concern is to remove the oil pressure sensor and install a hose with a mechanical oil pressure gauge on it and see what the "true" oil pressure is. If the mechanical gauge shows no problem, then it is is in the sensor or circuit.

    One thing to remember on electrical dash gauges, they are NEVER accurate. The give a "baseline".
    Thanks guys. Like I said, I am totally impressed!
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    If you guys ever run into problems that you need quick advice on the automotive stuff, click on my website (says Homepage) in my profile and in our forums, there is a mechanic's group that answer questions in our forums.

    Understand that with written words, there are often a lot of back and forth questions and answers so that the mechanic can understand what the problem is.

    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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    taythegibstaythegibs Posts: 2,025
    Hey man, any updates on your Explorer? Hoping for the best for you! I had a really weird dream about it last night... apparently you swapped in a 429 in the thing and drag raced it. lol
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    [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 3,917
    Hey, so far there's no update. They still can't hear anything at the new shop. All they heard this morning was "an exhaust leak" but it quieted down. We are going to try it one more time tomorrow, otherwise I pick it up and take it home.

    I did throw out that due to mileage could it be timing chain/tensiorer? He said that was his first thought but it should be okay. THanks for the help so far and I will update tomorrow.
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    james40:
    Hey, so far there's no update. They still can't hear anything at the new shop. All they heard this morning was "an exhaust leak" but it quieted down. We are going to try it one more time tomorrow, otherwise I pick it up and take it home.

    I did throw out that due to mileage could it be timing chain/tensiorer? He said that was his first thought but it should be okay. THanks for the help so far and I will update tomorrow.
    This is exactly the reason I always recommend folks get a second opinion when things don't seem right or if the estimate seems unreasonably high.
    If you went to the doctor and got a diagnosis that seemed off, you'd get a second opinion, wouldn't you?
    And who's word do you take to heart more? So if it is acceptable to get a second opinion from a doctor, then getting a second opinion from another shop should be acceptable.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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    [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 3,917
    taythegibs:
    Hey man, any updates on your Explorer? Hoping for the best for you! I had a really weird dream about it last night... apparently you swapped in a 429 in the thing and drag raced it. lol
    Just saw your engine upgrade and race comments...haha. Oh, I need your address since I missed your pass.
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    [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 3,917
    No problems at all besides the exhaust leak. They recommend picking it up as they hear no internal engine noise. Thanks for the help, hopefully this is the real problem.
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