Any Builders?

RainRain Posts: 8,960 ✭✭✭
I'm trying to learn the basics of building. In the not too far future, I'd like to build a shed-type of deal in order to use as a man cave...but I've never built anything in my life. Is there a book or something I can get that will explain the basics? I hope this makes sense ;) Even if I build it, I still need to get someone to do the electrical. Thoughts?

Comments

  • marineatbn03marineatbn03 Spring Hill, FLPosts: 2,657 ✭✭✭
    I watched bob the builder once. Seriously, Lowes and Home Depot often times have How-to and DIY sections on their website and are awesome resources. Also the DIY Network is another awesome resource. A shed in itself is not hard, it just depends on how fancy you want to get with it. Examine the cost to build one, and factor in your building experience and compare that to the shed and building kits that you can purchase and put together. If you get a kit then it is just a matter of finishing the inside with drywall or whatever your finished product is in your mind.
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    Hammer and nails are a good way to start. LOL Just kidding. I'm an older fart who has learned along the way. If I have one point to make it is this. Get the right tools. There is the proper tool for every job.
  • RainRain Posts: 8,960 ✭✭✭
    beatnic:
    Hammer and nails are a good way to start. LOL Just kidding. I'm an older fart who has learned along the way. If I have one point to make it is this. Get the right tools. There is the proper tool for every job.
    I'm where you started..I know I need some wood. As for the rest...um..haha. Might take James' advice and use Lowe's or Home Depot and go from there. I guess the first step is figure out how much space I want and how much I want to spend.
  • bigharpoonbigharpoon Posts: 2,963 ✭✭✭
    Rain:
    beatnic:
    Hammer and nails are a good way to start. LOL Just kidding. I'm an older fart who has learned along the way. If I have one point to make it is this. Get the right tools. There is the proper tool for every job.
    I'm where you started..I know I need some wood. As for the rest...um..haha. Might take James' advice and use Lowe's or Home Depot and go from there. I guess the first step is figure out how much space I want and how much I want to spend.
    Yes, and how much of your free time you want to invest building the thing. Keep in mind it's going to take you WAAAAAAAAAAYYY longer than you imagine. You don't need many tools to build a shed so don't worry about that, it's the time, bro, the time.
  • RainRain Posts: 8,960 ✭✭✭
    bigharpoon:
    Rain:
    beatnic:
    Hammer and nails are a good way to start. LOL Just kidding. I'm an older fart who has learned along the way. If I have one point to make it is this. Get the right tools. There is the proper tool for every job.
    I'm where you started..I know I need some wood. As for the rest...um..haha. Might take James' advice and use Lowe's or Home Depot and go from there. I guess the first step is figure out how much space I want and how much I want to spend.
    Yes, and how much of your free time you want to invest building the thing. Keep in mind it's going to take you WAAAAAAAAAAYYY longer than you imagine. You don't need many tools to build a shed so don't worry about that, it's the time, bro, the time.
    Well, the more time I spend building the more cigars I can smoke while doing it...hmm..
  • bigharpoonbigharpoon Posts: 2,963 ✭✭✭
    Rain:
    bigharpoon:
    Rain:
    beatnic:
    Hammer and nails are a good way to start. LOL Just kidding. I'm an older fart who has learned along the way. If I have one point to make it is this. Get the right tools. There is the proper tool for every job.
    I'm where you started..I know I need some wood. As for the rest...um..haha. Might take James' advice and use Lowe's or Home Depot and go from there. I guess the first step is figure out how much space I want and how much I want to spend.
    Yes, and how much of your free time you want to invest building the thing. Keep in mind it's going to take you WAAAAAAAAAAYYY longer than you imagine. You don't need many tools to build a shed so don't worry about that, it's the time, bro, the time.
    Well, the more time I spend building the more cigars I can smoke while doing it...hmm..
    YES!!!!!!!!! Now, THAT'S the ATTITUDE!!! Ahh, you're gonna be just fine...
  • RainRain Posts: 8,960 ✭✭✭
    I also need to decide to I want to get like a build-your-own shed or go 100% build it myself. Considering my skill level..haha. I think part of the fun will be drinking a beer and smoking a gar in it, saying "I built this myself."
  • JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
    Rain:
    I also need to decide to I want to get like a build-your-own shed or go 100% build it myself. Considering my skill level..haha. I think part of the fun will be drinking a beer and smoking a gar in it, saying "I built this myself."
    I’ve been building stuff all my life. I’ve framed houses, installed roofing, built furniture, and am now a Code Enforcement Officer. Here’s my advice.

    Do it. All education is painful, and we learn from our mistakes. You’ll make plenty. So what. You won’t do anything that can’t be repaired.

    Go to Home Depot or Lowes and get a book on sheds and basic construction. Read them. Read them again. Refer to them often, especially the one on basic construction. Pick a simple plan, preferably one with a simple roof.

    Get a good level. Use it. A lot. It won’t lie, so trust it. Learn to think in terms of your dimensioned lumber, and get a good tape measure. Do not cut corners on tools. Buy good ones.

    Your foundation must be level or your shed won’t be. Follow instructions until you have a level foundation, and trust your level.

    When cutting lumber, ALWAYS MEASURE TWO OR THREE TIMES BEFORE CUTTING. This will save you money and unnecessary trips to the lumber yard to buy more lumber. Train yourself to cut precisely EVERY TIME. When measuring a cut, mark the side of the cut where your saw blade should go, otherwise, you will end up with a bunch of wall studs that won’t be the same height.

    Your walls must be straight, and your corners must be 90 degrees. Use your level. If they aren’t straight, you’ll have trouble with your roof and siding.

    Follow the details for your roof EXACTLY. If you screw up, re-do it until it’s right.

    BE careful when installing the roofing sheathing. Find a friend who loves pain and fill him full of beer and pizza after the sheathing is installed. Read the instructions on the shingles, and follow them EXACTLY. Remember, when laying shingles straight lines are very good. Trust your tape measure.

    Have fun and try not to cuss too much.

    One more thing. If you build it yourself instead of buying a pre-cut kit, you will save about 50%. I built a shed last year (8' x 12' x 10') for about $1300. The same one at Lowes pre-cut was almost $3,000.
  • gmill880gmill880 Posts: 5,947
    JDH:
    Rain:
    I also need to decide to I want to get like a build-your-own shed or go 100% build it myself. Considering my skill level..haha. I think part of the fun will be drinking a beer and smoking a gar in it, saying "I built this myself."
    I’ve been building stuff all my life. I’ve framed houses, installed roofing, built furniture, and am now a Code Enforcement Officer. Here’s my advice.

    Do it. All education is painful, and we learn from our mistakes. You’ll make plenty. So what. You won’t do anything that can’t be repaired.

    Go to Home Depot or Lowes and get a book on sheds and basic construction. Read them. Read them again. Refer to them often, especially the one on basic construction. Pick a simple plan, preferably one with a simple roof.

    Get a good level. Use it. A lot. It won’t lie, so trust it. Learn to think in terms of your dimensioned lumber, and get a good tape measure. Do not cut corners on tools. Buy good ones.
    BR> Your foundation must be level or your shed won’t be. Follow instructions until you have a level foundation, and trust your level.

    When cutting lumber, ALWAYS MEASURE TWO OR THREE TIMES BEFORE CUTTING. This will save you money and unnecessary trips to the lumber yard to buy more lumber. Train yourself to cut precisely EVERY TIME. When measuring a cut, mark the side of the cut where your saw blade should go, otherwise, you will end up with a bunch of wall studs that won’t be the same height.

    Your walls must be straight, and your corners must be 90 degrees. Use your level. If they aren’t straight, you’ll have trouble with your roof and siding.

    Follow the details for your roof EXACTLY. If you screw up, re-do it until it’s right.

    BE careful when installing the roofing sheathing. Find a friend who loves pain and fill him full of beer and pizza after the sheathing is installed. Read the instructions on the shingles, and follow them EXACTLY. Remember, when laying shingles straight lines are very good. Trust your tape measure.

    Have fun and try not to cuss too much.

    Spot on advice ! I come from a family of builders and contractors . Always expect the unexpected . And the best advice really is there is almost not anything you can mess up that can't be fixed or straightened out .

    We have a local community college that had construction and bricklaying classes that used to take on building projects for free if they were small jobs and you supplied the materials . You have students doing the work but a professional guiding them . I don't know if they still do that now or not . But if its available in your area you can help someone learn a trade , get the job done right , and if your available to hang out with the instructor while it is being built you can ask questions and learn quite a bit by the time you are done . Help your community and yourself at the same time . Just a thought .
  • danielzreyesdanielzreyes Posts: 8,677 ✭✭✭✭✭
    ... and if you don't like to read, YouTube. Rewind is just a click/tap away.
    "It's plume, bro. Nothing to worry about. Got any Opus?" The suppose to be DZR
  • insomnniapbinsomnniapb Posts: 590
    Or you could just pitch a tent? haha
  • MVW67MVW67 WisconsinPosts: 5,573 ✭✭✭
    Square, plumb, and level, very important! I am a bricklayer by trade and nothing screws up a building faster then one if these being outta whack! Like JDH said learn the level. Squaring use 345 or 6,8,10 method just Google. Take your tine and learn. I teach in the construction trades and have seen my fair share of bad craftsmanship.
    Life is too short, live it like no tomorrow...
  • JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
    MVW67:
    Square, plumb, and level, very important! I am a bricklayer by trade and nothing screws up a building faster then one if these being outta whack! Like JDH said learn the level. Squaring use 345 or 6,8,10 method just Google. Take your tine and learn. I teach in the construction trades and have seen my fair share of bad craftsmanship.
    Aint it the truth!

    Square, plumb, & level, good tight joints, precise cuts, using the right fastener, and enough of 'em, transfer the load down to the ground, protect the exterior from the weather, & everythings gonna be all right.

    FYI - the worst job I ever had was one summer break in college in East Texas I was a bricklayer's helper. That means I was a damn mule hauling bricks to guys like you so you wouldn't have to slow down too much. At the end of that job, I didn't have 1/2 oz of fat anywhere on my body, and my muscles were steel ropes, and I was just as dumb as a mule.
  • gmill880gmill880 Posts: 5,947
    JDH:
    MVW67:
    Square, plumb, and level, very important! I am a bricklayer by trade and nothing screws up a building faster then one if these being outta whack! Like JDH said learn the level. Squaring use 345 or 6,8,10 method just Google. Take your tine and learn. I teach in the construction trades and have seen my fair share of bad craftsmanship.
    Aint it the truth!

    Square, plumb, & level, good tight joints, precise cuts, using the right fastener, and enough of 'em, transfer the load down to the ground, protect the exterior from the weather, & everythings gonna be all right.

    FYI - the worst job I ever had was one summer break in college in East Texas I was a bricklayer's helper. That means I was a damn mule hauling bricks to guys like you so you wouldn't have to slow down too much. At the end of that job, I didn't have 1/2 oz of fat anywhere on my body, and my muscles were steel ropes, and I was just as dumb as a mule.

    JDH when I read your last comment I had an image of a mule with a cigar in its mouth pulling and puffing - funny stuff right there !!!
  • RBeckomRBeckom Home or out and about somewhere.Posts: 2,190 ✭✭✭
    A handsaw, hatchet and a glass of water will do very nicely.
    Old school is the way to go my friend.
    By the way.........
    Don't forget the bandages as mishaps will happen!


    Have you considered a domed structure?
    A true mancave.
    I plan to construct one in the near future using sandbag construction.
  • RainRain Posts: 8,960 ✭✭✭
    RBeckom:
    A handsaw, hatchet and a glass of water will do very nicely.
    Old school is the way to go my friend.
    By the way.........
    Don't forget the bandages as mishaps will happen!


    Have you considered a domed structure?
    A true mancave.
    I plan to construct one in the near future using sandbag construction.
    Domed?! I'm worried about putting a roof on period, I don't need to complicate it! ;)
  • JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
    Rain:
    RBeckom:
    A handsaw, hatchet and a glass of water will do very nicely.
    Old school is the way to go my friend.
    By the way.........
    Don't forget the bandages as mishaps will happen!


    Have you considered a domed structure?
    A true mancave.
    I plan to construct one in the near future using sandbag construction.
    Domed?! I'm worried about putting a roof on period, I don't need to complicate it! ;)
    Yea, the dome might be doomed.
  • RBeckomRBeckom Home or out and about somewhere.Posts: 2,190 ✭✭✭
    JDH:
    Rain:
    RBeckom:
    A handsaw, hatchet and a glass of water will do very nicely.
    Old school is the way to go my friend.
    By the way.........
    Don't forget the bandages as mishaps will happen!


    Have you considered a domed structure?
    A true mancave.
    I plan to construct one in the near future using sandbag construction.
    Domed?! I'm worried about putting a roof on period, I don't need to complicate it! ;)
    Yea, the dome might be doomed.



    :-)
  • RainRain Posts: 8,960 ✭✭✭
    RBeckom:
    JDH:
    Rain:
    RBeckom:
    A handsaw, hatchet and a glass of water will do very nicely.
    Old school is the way to go my friend.
    By the way.........
    Don't forget the bandages as mishaps will happen!


    Have you considered a domed structure?
    A true mancave.
    I plan to construct one in the near future using sandbag construction.
    Domed?! I'm worried about putting a roof on period, I don't need to complicate it! ;)
    Yea, the dome might be doomed.



    :-)
    But hey brother, if you can do it...go for it!
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    RBeckom:
    A handsaw, hatchet and a glass of water will do very nicely.
    Old school is the way to go my friend.
    By the way.........
    Don't forget the bandages as mishaps will happen!


    Have you considered a domed structure?
    A true mancave.
    I plan to construct one in the near future using sandbag construction.
    Handsaws and hatchets.....The first wireless tools!
  • jadeltjadelt Posts: 766
    All great advice (well most of it lol) I have been considering building my own as well. Here is one design that I like and want to try to build. Maybe we can get a "herf-a-barn" raising group together.

    http://tinyhouseblog.com/pre-fab/cavco-cabins/

    image

    image

    Or something simpler here is one more......

    http://www.rd.com/images/offer/fh/project_plans/pdf/FH04JAU_RusticYardShed.pdf
  • RainRain Posts: 8,960 ✭✭✭
    Man, if I built that..I would move out of my house, in to the back yard and live there.
  • JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
    I'll bet if you did all the work yourself, you could get this build for under $20K (assuming you already have the land), and if you cut the logs yourself, or bought direct from a Logging company, you could get it done even cheaper than that. What is that, about 700 sq' total?
  • jadeltjadelt Posts: 766
    JDH:
    I'll bet if you did all the work yourself, you could get this build for under $20K (assuming you already have the land), and if you cut the logs yourself, or bought direct from a Logging company, you could get it done even cheaper than that. What is that, about 700 sq' total?
    It is actually 20 x 12 so 240 sq ft (not counting the front porch). Not true logs just log siding. Your price is a bit high assuming you dont use high end finishes on the inside.

    Here is another resource for 'Tiny Houses'

    http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/pages/box-bungalow-book
  • JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
    jadelt:
    JDH:
    I'll bet if you did all the work yourself, you could get this build for under $20K (assuming you already have the land), and if you cut the logs yourself, or bought direct from a Logging company, you could get it done even cheaper than that. What is that, about 700 sq' total?
    It is actually 20 x 12 so 240 sq ft (not counting the front porch). Not true logs just log siding. Your price is a bit high assuming you dont use high end finishes on the inside.

    Here is another resource for 'Tiny Houses'

    http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/pages/box-bungalow-book
    Sometimes I'm just dumber than a rock.
  • jthanatosjthanatos Posts: 1,570 ✭✭
    jadelt:
    JDH:
    I'll bet if you did all the work yourself, you could get this build for under $20K (assuming you already have the land), and if you cut the logs yourself, or bought direct from a Logging company, you could get it done even cheaper than that. What is that, about 700 sq' total?
    It is actually 20 x 12 so 240 sq ft (not counting the front porch). Not true logs just log siding. Your price is a bit high assuming you dont use high end finishes on the inside.

    Here is another resource for 'Tiny Houses'

    http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/pages/box-bungalow-book
    Why did you have to post this? Now I want one. I want one baaaad.
  • taythegibstaythegibs Posts: 2,025
    RBeckom:
    A handsaw, hatchet and a glass of water will do very nicely.
    Old school is the way to go my friend.
    By the way.........
    Don't forget the bandages as mishaps will happen!


    Have you considered a domed structure?
    A true mancave.
    I plan to construct one in the near future using sandbag construction.
    I want to build an 'Earthbag' building (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthbag_construction) , i think it would do okay with the soil in the NWGA area.
  • RBeckomRBeckom Home or out and about somewhere.Posts: 2,190 ✭✭✭
    taythegibs:
    RBeckom:
    A handsaw, hatchet and a glass of water will do very nicely.
    Old school is the way to go my friend.
    By the way.........
    Don't forget the bandages as mishaps will happen!


    Have you considered a domed structure?
    A true mancave.
    I plan to construct one in the near future using sandbag construction.
    I want to build an 'Earthbag' building (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthbag_construction) , i think it would do okay with the soil in the NWGA area.



    The red clay veins of NW Georgia are very well suited to this type of construction. This fact alone is what got me thinking of sandbag construction in the first place, free materials with very little spent on the actual bags. The labor on the other hand.........
  • taythegibstaythegibs Posts: 2,025
    RBeckom:
    taythegibs:
    RBeckom:
    A handsaw, hatchet and a glass of water will do very nicely.
    Old school is the way to go my friend.
    By the way.........
    Don't forget the bandages as mishaps will happen!


    Have you considered a domed structure?
    A true mancave.
    I plan to construct one in the near future using sandbag construction.
    I want to build an 'Earthbag' building (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthbag_construction) , i think it would do okay with the soil in the NWGA area.



    The red clay veins of NW Georgia are very well suited to this type of construction. This fact alone is what got me thinking of sandbag construction in the first place, free materials with very little spent on the actual bags. The labor on the other hand.........
    i could use the workout, lol. we just took down a couple of miles of barbed wire at my grandparents place last summer so that'd be dirt cheap for me too... but i really shouldn't do that.
  • jsnakejsnake Kansas CityPosts: 5,796 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Those little places are cool. I thought about getting a nice $700 shed at Lowe's and finishing the inside myself. I am still working on my subbasement and basement. Projects take lots of time and money. I am short of both. It is fun learning these new skills though. I am doing drywall now and boy what a learning experience.
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