DIY Drywall Repair Question

Ken_LightKen_Light Posts: 3,539 ✭✭✭
I have a room where the drywall backing is sort of coming off the drywall itself, pretty extemsively. I went to Home Depot for some advice because I wanted to paint the room anyway, and their first advice was to take a chunk out, put some spackle on it that goes on pink and dries white and make sure it dries so there is no current moisture problem causing it. It's been like that since I bought the house a year or so and the roof is new, so my best guess is there was an old moisture problem that they fixed but didn't repair all the damage. I did this, and it dried fine.

So the plan I have, on some advice from an older guy at Home Depot, is to rip off all the loose backing, put up joint tape, spackle over that, prime, and paint.

I know there are a lot of handy guys on here, so I was hoping maybe you'd be able to tell me if this will be a good way to go or if there's a better way (or if this is completely terrible, I have no ego at stake here, this isn't my plan after all).
^Troll: DO NOT FEED.

Comments

  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    It sounds like you had moisture in the dry wall. I would just replace it. It is much easier than dealing with this year after year. And new installation is much easier than patching. You do own the house? In the words of Mike Holmes, "do it right". JMO
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 4,880 ✭✭✭✭✭
    beatnic:
    It sounds like you had moisture in the dry wall. I would just replace it. It is much easier than dealing with this year after year. And new installation is much easier than patching. You do own the house? In the words of Mike Holmes, "do it right". JMO
    agreed. You'll do more work patching a 2'x2' hole than you will replacing the whole piece.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as someone else's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • Ken_LightKen_Light Posts: 3,539 ✭✭✭
    Amos Umwhat:
    beatnic:
    It sounds like you had moisture in the dry wall. I would just replace it. It is much easier than dealing with this year after year. And new installation is much easier than patching. You do own the house? In the words of Mike Holmes, "do it right". JMO
    agreed. You'll do more work patching a 2'x2' hole than you will replacing the whole piece.
    No hole in the dry wall though, just the backing peeling off. Do you really think I need to replace it? It looks fine.
    ^Troll: DO NOT FEED.
  • bearbbearb Posts: 1,128 ✭✭✭
    Can you post a picture or 3 or the issue?
    NOt exactly sure what you mean by 'the backing peeling off'...is this the opposite paper side of drywall that is NOT painted?
    perhaps it is just too early in the morning for me to grasp.
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 4,880 ✭✭✭✭✭
    hmm, I may not be visualizing your problem. The backing? My terminology may not be correct, either, but usually you have a backing that is essentially a heavy paper / light cardboard material, an inner core of gypsum, and a front sheath, also heavy paper that is somewhat canvas-like. Two kinds of strength, the rigidity of the gypsum inside, surrounded by the cohesion of the paper layers. Once that gypsum is exposed it's very vulnerable to even slight moisture, and will quickly decompose. In other words, if I understand you rightly, if you don't have a hole yet, you're about to.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as someone else's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • Ken_LightKen_Light Posts: 3,539 ✭✭✭
    Amos Umwhat:
    hmm, I may not be visualizing your problem. The backing? My terminology may not be correct, either, but usually you have a backing that is essentially a heavy paper / light cardboard material, an inner core of gypsum, and a front sheath, also heavy paper that is somewhat canvas-like. Two kinds of strength, the rigidity of the gypsum inside, surrounded by the cohesion of the paper layers. Once that gypsum is exposed it's very vulnerable to even slight moisture, and will quickly decompose. In other words, if I understand you rightly, if you don't have a hole yet, you're about to.
    It's like cardboard, on the interior facing side the painted side. If I could describe what it looked like, it'd be like wallpaper starting to peel off the wall, but the walls are painted. Actually my first thought was the previous owners had painted over wallpaper and it was peeling. My terminology might be wrong. I'm trying the fix first, since it's relatively cheap. If problems recur, I'll replace. So far i tore it off where it was coming loose, put the joint tape on, applied spackle. I think the tape is supposed to help the spackle adhere and the spackle is supposed to re-seal the gypsum? Also priming and painting on top of the spackle. Hopefully this works out, otherwise I guess I'll know soon enough and will just replace then.
    ^Troll: DO NOT FEED.
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    I'm also having trouble visualizing this. If its' wallpaper, peel it off. If the thick paper that is part of the dry wall is separating, then you have (had) a moisture problem. Painting will not last. Spackle? Spackle is generally used for wood. Joint compound is the correct product to use. Also what Amos said.
  • RBeckomRBeckom Home or out and about somewhere.Posts: 2,190 ✭✭✭
    Does the room have direct access to the attic?
    If so you may want to climb into it look for signs of mildew in and under the insulation.
    A light roof leak getting between the walls perhaps?
    Either way your best choice it to take other's advise and re-rock the wall or walls affected.
    Exterior wall are more prone to this affliction.
    Is this the case?
    If so a vapor barrier such as polyethylene or house wrapping installed before the rock goes in will stop future damage from occurring.
  • The_KidThe_Kid Posts: 7,871 ✭✭✭
    Ken Light:
    Amos Umwhat:
    hmm, I may not be visualizing your problem. The backing? My terminology may not be correct, either, but usually you have a backing that is essentially a heavy paper / light cardboard material, an inner core of gypsum, and a front sheath, also heavy paper that is somewhat canvas-like. Two kinds of strength, the rigidity of the gypsum inside, surrounded by the cohesion of the paper layers. Once that gypsum is exposed it's very vulnerable to even slight moisture, and will quickly decompose. In other words, if I understand you rightly, if you don't have a hole yet, you're about to.
    It's like cardboard, on the interior facing side the painted side. If I could describe what it looked like, it'd be like wallpaper starting to peel off the wall, but the walls are painted. Actually my first thought was the previous owners had painted over wallpaper and it was peeling. My terminology might be wrong. I'm trying the fix first, since it's relatively cheap. If problems recur, I'll replace. So far i tore it off where it was coming loose, put the joint tape on, applied spackle. I think the tape is supposed to help the spackle adhere and the spackle is supposed to re-seal the gypsum? Also priming and painting on top of the spackle. Hopefully this works out, otherwise I guess I'll know soon enough and will just replace then.
    Best advice,, hire someone!
  • Ken_LightKen_Light Posts: 3,539 ✭✭✭
    No direct access to the attic, but there is attic above and it is an exterior wall. I think it's an old moisture problem. I'll probably find out soon enough if this doesn't work. Trying not to hire someone, I figure there's no further damage that can be done by trying this first...right?
    ^Troll: DO NOT FEED.
  • RBeckomRBeckom Home or out and about somewhere.Posts: 2,190 ✭✭✭
    Ken Light:
    No direct access to the attic, but there is attic above and it is an exterior wall. I think it's an old moisture problem. I'll probably find out soon enough if this doesn't work. Trying not to hire someone, I figure there's no further damage that can be done by trying this first...right?



    You are definitely right there.
    The biggest problem with exterior walls is the lack of insulation or placing the vapor barrier on the insulation in the wrong position.
    Hanging rock is not that hard if you end up going that way.
    A few friends, some BBQ and a beverage of choice can really speed up the process, though I would consider a professional finisher.
    That is where the hard part lies and they usually work cheap because of the speed in which an experienced finisher can go.
    Not to mention a fine finish for your primer and paint.
  • Ken_LightKen_Light Posts: 3,539 ✭✭✭
    RBeckom:
    Ken Light:
    No direct access to the attic, but there is attic above and it is an exterior wall. I think it's an old moisture problem. I'll probably find out soon enough if this doesn't work. Trying not to hire someone, I figure there's no further damage that can be done by trying this first...right?



    You are definitely right there.
    The biggest problem with exterior walls is the lack of insulation or placing the vapor barrier on the insulation in the wrong position.
    Hanging rock is not that hard if you end up going that way.
    A few friends, some BBQ and a beverage of choice can really speed up the process, though I would consider a professional finisher.
    That is where the hard part lies and they usually work cheap because of the speed in which an experienced finisher can go.
    Not to mention a fine finish for your primer and paint.
    I hope it doesn't come to that, but it's really good to know I can't do any further harm in trying, thanks!
    ^Troll: DO NOT FEED.
  • RBeckomRBeckom Home or out and about somewhere.Posts: 2,190 ✭✭✭
    Ken Light:
    RBeckom:
    Ken Light:
    No direct access to the attic, but there is attic above and it is an exterior wall. I think it's an old moisture problem. I'll probably find out soon enough if this doesn't work. Trying not to hire someone, I figure there's no further damage that can be done by trying this first...right?



    You are definitely right there.
    The biggest problem with exterior walls is the lack of insulation or placing the vapor barrier on the insulation in the wrong position.
    Hanging rock is not that hard if you end up going that way.
    A few friends, some BBQ and a beverage of choice can really speed up the process, though I would consider a professional finisher.
    That is where the hard part lies and they usually work cheap because of the speed in which an experienced finisher can go.
    Not to mention a fine finish for your primer and paint.
    I hope it doesn't come to that, but it's really good to know I can't do any further harm in trying, thanks!



    I hate to have to mention this but since you have the peeling problem, you probably have at the very least some mold and-or mildew behind the wall.
    Good luck with your repair. May it hold for a long time.
  • fla-gypsyfla-gypsy Posts: 3,024 ✭✭
    Been working at United States Gypsum for 30 years making this stuff. You are describing delamination. It could be just a bad piece of wallboard when produced or could be a moisture intrusion issue. Knock/cut a hole in it and see what the problem is and you can best decide how to address it. Replacing a small piece is quite simple. BTW the idiots at HD don't know anything about wallboard. We invented Sheetrock and own the name, everything else is just wallboard!
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