Experimentation in Rest and Aging.

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Comments

  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭✭
    madurofan:
    kuzi16:
    madurofan:
    kuzi16:
    its not so much that your tastes have changed, but your palate. now that you pay so much attention to flavor, have you developed your palate so that you taste more in a cigar than you would have in the past?
    This right here is why I gave up on aging, resting, whatever and trying to tell the differences. Now I just smoke em when I feel like it. If I smoke a cigar and can tell it needs more time to finish its fermentation then I note that. Other than that I just smoke em and enjoy them. You can definetly think your way right out of enjoying a cigar.
    ive just noticed that i tend to like very strong cigars that have had a few years to age.
    We've had this discussion before, but for the benefit of others I'll rehash it.

    I believe you like stronger cigars aged because you like a smoother earthier cigar with more subtleties. I enjoy an in your face, peppery cigar that finishes with a bite. The bite is the first thing to go when a cigar is aged. The peppery notes tend to subside as well. This is good for the complexity of a cigar but bad if you enjoy those.
    thats true. getting that full bodied yet smooth and complex cigar is the challenge
  • phobicsquirrelphobicsquirrel Posts: 7,349
    j0z3r:
    vankleekkw:
    Just an FYI.... Anything less than 5-10 years technically is just resting.
    That's a pretty rigid time fixture. Not all cigars are going to age the same, and some will hold up to 5 years far better than others. So in that respect, you can't truly fix one length of time as "true aging".

    Related to that, I looked up an article on cigar aging written by Steve Saka of Drew Estates cigars...hopefully the relation to DE doesn't shake his credibility. :) Link
    nice read. I've had a couple cigars two years ago then had them again recently and to be honest couldn't say it's too much better. I liked it then and now.
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,152
    kuzi16:
    madurofan:
    kuzi16:
    madurofan:
    kuzi16:
    its not so much that your tastes have changed, but your palate. now that you pay so much attention to flavor, have you developed your palate so that you taste more in a cigar than you would have in the past?
    This right here is why I gave up on aging, resting, whatever and trying to tell the differences. Now I just smoke em when I feel like it. If I smoke a cigar and can tell it needs more time to finish its fermentation then I note that. Other than that I just smoke em and enjoy them. You can definetly think your way right out of enjoying a cigar.
    ive just noticed that i tend to like very strong cigars that have had a few years to age.
    We've had this discussion before, but for the benefit of others I'll rehash it.

    I believe you like stronger cigars aged because you like a smoother earthier cigar with more subtleties. I enjoy an in your face, peppery cigar that finishes with a bite. The bite is the first thing to go when a cigar is aged. The peppery notes tend to subside as well. This is good for the complexity of a cigar but bad if you enjoy those.
    thats true. getting that full bodied yet smooth and complex cigar is the challenge
    It is indeed a challenge.
  • clearlysuspectclearlysuspect Jacksonville, FloridaPosts: 2,124 ✭✭✭✭
    kuzi16:
    vankleekkw:
    Just an FYI.... Anything less than 5-10 years technically is just resting.
    j0z3r:
    vankleekkw:
    Just an FYI.... Anything less than 5-10 years technically is just resting.
    That's a pretty rigid time fixture. Not all cigars are going to age the same, and some will hold up to 5 years far better than others. So in that respect, you can't truly fix one length of time as "true aging".

    Related to that, I looked up an article on cigar aging written by Steve Saka of Drew Estates cigars...hopefully the relation to DE doesn't shake his credibility. :) Link
    i agree with joe here a bit. Here is a thread that goes a bit more into all of that.


    this is also linked in another active thread
    Definately good read from both links listed here. I feel a little better as I think I chose the right time frame for this experiment (2-5 years) based on the JR recommendations.

    At the bottom of the thread that Kuzi posted is an interesting little experiment where a guy samples a cigar once a week or so to see how rest affects it. The guy lost all credibility with me though in week 4 when he said that the experiment was compromised because he drinks "diet peach iced tea." Who drinks diet peach iced tea????
  • TatuajeVITatuajeVI Posts: 2,378
    lol, what a ridiculous drink. Reminds me of something Derek Zoolander would drink. "Orange mocha frappachino!!!!"
  • clearlysuspectclearlysuspect Jacksonville, FloridaPosts: 2,124 ✭✭✭✭
    TatuajeVI:
    lol, what a ridiculous drink. Reminds me of something Derek Zoolander would drink. "Orange mocha frappachino!!!!"
    mmmm.... Orange mocha frappachina actually sounds pretty tastey. Kinda like those chocolates with the orange center, except with coffee.
  • FourtotheflushFourtotheflush Posts: 2,555
    I like peaches, but cannot stand fake peach flavor!

    On the other hand I love fake bananna flavor for some reason.

  • clearlysuspectclearlysuspect Jacksonville, FloridaPosts: 2,124 ✭✭✭✭
    clearlysuspect:
    kuzi16:
    vankleekkw:
    Just an FYI.... Anything less than 5-10 years technically is just resting.
    j0z3r:
    vankleekkw:
    Just an FYI.... Anything less than 5-10 years technically is just resting.
    That's a pretty rigid time fixture. Not all cigars are going to age the same, and some will hold up to 5 years far better than others. So in that respect, you can't truly fix one length of time as "true aging".

    Related to that, I looked up an article on cigar aging written by Steve Saka of Drew Estates cigars...hopefully the relation to DE doesn't shake his credibility. :) Link
    i agree with joe here a bit. Here is a thread that goes a bit more into all of that.


    this is also linked in another active thread
    Definately good read from both links listed here. I feel a little better as I think I chose the right time frame for this experiment (2-5 years) based on the JR recommendations.

    At the bottom of the thread that Kuzi posted is an interesting little experiment where a guy samples a cigar once a week or so to see how rest affects it. The guy lost all credibility with me though in week 4 when he said that the experiment was compromised because he drinks "diet peach iced tea." Who drinks diet peach iced tea????
    I can't believe I forgot to update this. Shortly after typing this, I went into a gas station to get a drink for smoking my cigar and what did I find? None other than Diet Peach Iced Tea. So I gave it a shot. It wasn't that bad.
  • urbinourbino Posts: 4,517
    kuzi16:
    madurofan:
    kuzi16:
    madurofan:
    kuzi16:
    its not so much that your tastes have changed, but your palate. now that you pay so much attention to flavor, have you developed your palate so that you taste more in a cigar than you would have in the past?
    This right here is why I gave up on aging, resting, whatever and trying to tell the differences. Now I just smoke em when I feel like it. If I smoke a cigar and can tell it needs more time to finish its fermentation then I note that. Other than that I just smoke em and enjoy them. You can definetly think your way right out of enjoying a cigar.
    ive just noticed that i tend to like very strong cigars that have had a few years to age.
    We've had this discussion before, but for the benefit of others I'll rehash it.

    I believe you like stronger cigars aged because you like a smoother earthier cigar with more subtleties. I enjoy an in your face, peppery cigar that finishes with a bite. The bite is the first thing to go when a cigar is aged. The peppery notes tend to subside as well. This is good for the complexity of a cigar but bad if you enjoy those.
    thats true. getting that full bodied yet smooth and complex cigar is the challenge
    I'm with kuz on this one. My humi is currently in a state where nearly everything in it has at least a year on it, but there's nothing older than that (except for a few odds and ends from ccom's aging room). I've noticed that even with just a year on it, the Don Carlos improves immensely. And that's saying something, since I could stand in the factory and smoke those as soon as they're rolled, and love them.
  • clearlysuspectclearlysuspect Jacksonville, FloridaPosts: 2,124 ✭✭✭✭
    Time to enjoy a Cigar.com Brazil Label Torpedo. This is part 2 of a 5 year experiment to observe and learn from the benefits of rest and aging on cigars.

    Comments on Cigar:

    This cigar had a slight chip in the wrapper about 1” from the tip. Perhaps I should have kept the wrappers on, but after examining the other 8 cigars, it appears this is the only one that is damaged.

    The cigar started a bit bitter but quickly changed to a very nutty flavor. This flavor remained through the first third. With the cigar burning even and smooth, the solid white ash fell off at 2”. The flavors turned sweet and hints of chocolate and cocoa became present.

    About half way in, the cigar suddenly turned horribly bitter. Thinking it was tar build-up, I shaved a little bit of the tip off. This didn’t help and the cigar became even more bitter. I tried smoking another inch thinking this was just a rough spot and that it would pass. It didn’t. I had to set it down just a little over half way into it as it was just becoming torture.

    I’m not sure what caused this. Was it a bad stick? Did I do something wrong in storing it? I haven’t had this problem in any of my other cigars in my humidor. I certainly hadn’t accounted for the possibility of a bad stick in my experiment. Well, not much to be done about it. Guess we’ll see what happens in another 6 months.
  • FourtotheflushFourtotheflush Posts: 2,555
    Is there anything that analyzes cigars like wine? Drink now or age for 1-2 years? Smoke now, smoke after 1 year etc?
  • urbinourbino Posts: 4,517
    Bad sample would be my guess, clearlysuspect. Like you said, you'll know in 6 months.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,616 ✭✭✭✭
    Fourtotheflush:
    Is there anything that analyzes cigars like wine? Drink now or age for 1-2 years? Smoke now, smoke after 1 year etc?
    years of experience.

    thats the best i got.

    but a good rule of thumb is the stronger a cigar is the better it will age.
  • DiamondogDiamondog Posts: 4,169
    Hows this going?
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