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Question..2 different hydrometers...same calibration test.

jd50aejd50ae Posts: 7,900 ✭✭✭✭✭
As recommended by the manufacturer. The digital one says to calibrate to 75 and the analog one says to calibrate to 70. Is one right and the other wrong..? I know most will say go with the digital but I still have questions. Is there a "for sure" trustworthy hydrometer..?

Even if some coinage has to be laid out for one that can be trusted, and used to calibrate the rest, it might be worth it.

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    Lee.mcglynnLee.mcglynn Posts: 5,960 ✭✭✭✭
    Well the salt test should give you 75 so I'd go with that
    Money can't buy taste
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    jd50aejd50ae Posts: 7,900 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Lee.mcglynn:
    Well the salt test should give you 75 so I'd go with that


    Until I can do better with the meters I think that is the best choice.
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    CigaryCigary Posts: 630
    When buying a hygro try and get one that is adjustable..it will save you headaches in the future as we all want one that is accurate. Once it's established through a salt test that your hygro is working you can adjust it if it's off by 1 or 2%. Nothing worse than have to do math by 1 or 2% for those hygros that are off.
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    Bob_LukenBob_Luken Posts: 10,129 ✭✭✭✭✭
    All I've ever heard was that you should have a 75% reading on the salt test. And adjusting analogs is an exercise in futility. It's easier to do the math that to keep endlessly sticking screwdrivers into the back of those fickle things.
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    jlmartajlmarta Posts: 7,881 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Bob Luken:
    All I've ever heard was that you should have a 75% reading on the salt test. And adjusting analogs is an exercise in futility. It's easier to do the math that to keep endlessly sticking screwdrivers into the back of those fickle things.
    The very best test for an analog hygrometer is the trash can test. You simply open the trash can, drop the analog hygro into it, close the trash can and walk away. You'll be far better off in the long run, trust me.
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    jd50aejd50ae Posts: 7,900 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Bob Luken:
    All I've ever heard was that you should have a 75% reading on the salt test. And adjusting analogs is an exercise in futility. It's easier to do the math that to keep endlessly sticking screwdrivers into the back of those fickle things.


    I bought an analog meter and it says the salt test should read 70 and that is why I posed the question. I am confused to say the least and for now I am sticking with the digital to set everything.
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    Bob_LukenBob_Luken Posts: 10,129 ✭✭✭✭✭
    jlmarta:
    Bob Luken:
    All I've ever heard was that you should have a 75% reading on the salt test. And adjusting analogs is an exercise in futility. It's easier to do the math that to keep endlessly sticking screwdrivers into the back of those fickle things.
    The very best test for an analog hygrometer is the trash can test. You simply open the trash can, drop the analog hygro into it, close the trash can and walk away. You'll be far better off in the long run, trust me.
    LOL That's true.

    I've abandoned all my analogs but one. I think it's a fluke but it's fairly accurate. (I still don't trust it though.)
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    Bob_LukenBob_Luken Posts: 10,129 ✭✭✭✭✭
    jd50ae:
    Bob Luken:
    All I've ever heard was that you should have a 75% reading on the salt test. And adjusting analogs is an exercise in futility. It's easier to do the math that to keep endlessly sticking screwdrivers into the back of those fickle things.


    I bought an analog meter and it says the salt test should read 70 and that is why I posed the question. I am confused to say the least and for now I am sticking with the digital to set everything.
    Well, I'd try to salt test them both by their individual directions. After you're done salt testing, Next stick them in one humi together overnight and see if they are reading close together or not. If they are not within 5% of each other then salt test the analog again and adjust it to get a 75% during in the test. Then pair them up again to see what you get. Bottom line though is that most analogs can't be trusted.
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    jlmartajlmarta Posts: 7,881 ✭✭✭✭✭
    You can't expect much accuracy from a device that uses a hair (sometimes horse, sometimes human) for its primary sensing function. Besides, what if the human hair is from a blonde?? LOL
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