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I know draw is important, very important.

jd50aejd50ae Posts: 7,900 ✭✭✭✭✭
To me it is at least 50% of whether I like the smoke or not.

What percentage do you give for draw..?

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    jlmartajlmarta Posts: 7,881 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yeah, I'd go along with that. I don't want the draw to be like sucking air through a straw but I also don't want it to be tight enough to give me a hernia, either.

    then, add the right body and a great flavor and I'll be a happy camper....
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    Puff_DougiePuff_Dougie Posts: 4,599 ✭✭✭✭✭
    It's definitely a big factor for me too, JD. Nothing worse than a cigar that makes you work for every puff. I suppose you could argue that a dog rocket with a plugged draw is actually a blessing in disguise, but I probably consider a nice even draw about 50-60% of my rating scale as well.
    "When I have found intense pain relieved, a weary brain soothed, and calm, refreshing sleep obtained by a cigar, I have felt grateful to God, and have blessed His name." - Charles Haddon Spurgeon
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Fighting a bad draw just adds frustration to trying to enjoy a good cigar.
    I don't smoke for frustration. So yeah, draw would be right up there in whether I enjoy the cigar or not.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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    jd50aejd50ae Posts: 7,900 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The reason I ask, is because there are some really good smokes out there that don't ever draw real easy. They are not "really bad" draws, but it is noticeable from a nice easy draw that allows a a smoker to really enjoy all the nuances of a particular cigar. I have wondered if some manufacturers purposely do this to force us to slow down when you smoke one of their cigars.
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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    jd50ae:
    The reason I ask, is because there are some really good smokes out there that don't ever draw real easy. They are not "really bad" draws, but it is noticeable from a nice easy draw that allows a a smoker to really enjoy all the nuances of a particular cigar. I have wondered if some manufacturers purposely do this to force us to slow down when you smoke one of their cigars.
    When ever I cut a cigar, I check the draw.
    If it's tight, it definitely makes a difference on whether or not I will enjoy it.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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    Gray4linesGray4lines Posts: 4,691 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Also, if you have a tight draw the cigar will not burn well. This usually ruins the flavor. I hate a tight draw more than anything. More times than not, it's a humidity issue.
    LLA - Lancero Lovers of America
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    alienmisprintalienmisprint Posts: 3,964 ✭✭✭
    Draw is huge to me as well. I have noticed that age plays a big factor in that. Some cigars have nice, easy draws straight from the B&M, but for those that have a little more resistance than you like, let them sit for 4-6 months and go back and try them again. I have found the same thing to be true with burn on many sticks. Aging does affects more than just the flavor.
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    jd50aejd50ae Posts: 7,900 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Gray4lines:
    Also, if you have a tight draw the cigar will not burn well. This usually ruins the flavor. I hate a tight draw more than anything. More times than not, it's a humidity issue.


    What I am talking about has nothing to do with humidity. The same cigar bought at the same time and kept in the same humidor with others bought at the same time.

    I agree, humidity can cause draw problems and I have let some cigars age as you have suggested. But this is more of a manufacturing problem. Not really a red in the face oxygen sucking totally bad draw but just not as easy as I would like.
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    Bob_LukenBob_Luken Posts: 10,148 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Speaking of draw, I conducted a little experiment with two conny cigars of the same blend today. I lit a Ramon Bueso Odysey torpedo that I got in a pass several months ago. I had kept this one in a small desktop. I wasn't loving the flavor or the draw. I kept clipping off more and more of the tip in an attempt to gain a better draw. Then I decided to grab another Ramon Bueso Odysey. But this time a robusto from a box of them in my cooler that I've rested about ten months. The robusto was a much better draw. Seemed by weight to be lighter (maybe it was packed less dense). And it produced a better flavor than the torpedo. Was the better draw responsible for the improved flavor? Can't say for sure as they were stored in different humis and the age of the torp is unknown. So there could be several factors at play to create the better draw and flavor but the second one was certainly more enjoyable.
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    Lee.mcglynnLee.mcglynn Posts: 5,960 ✭✭✭✭
    I puff rather lightly so draw isn't much of a issue but I have had some badly plugged ones I just chuck
    Money can't buy taste
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    jd50aejd50ae Posts: 7,900 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Bob Luken:
    Speaking of draw, I conducted a little experiment with two conny cigars of the same blend today. I lit a Ramon Bueso Odysey torpedo that I got in a pass several months ago. I had kept this one in a small desktop. I wasn't loving the flavor or the draw. I kept clipping off more and more of the tip in an attempt to gain a better draw. Then I decided to grab another Ramon Bueso Odysey. But this time a robusto from a box of them in my cooler that I've rested about ten months. The robusto was a much better draw. Seemed by weight to be lighter (maybe it was packed less dense). And it produced a better flavor than the torpedo. Was the better draw responsible for the improved flavor? Can't say for sure as they were stored in different humis and the age of the torp is unknown. So there could be several factors at play to create the better draw and flavor but the second one was certainly more enjoyable.


    Have had the same experience and it is one big reason I do my best to let every cigar rest/age for at least 3 months.
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    Bob_LukenBob_Luken Posts: 10,148 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I've had a few CAO Sopranos and every one of them had a very tight draw. I'm on the lookout for a draw poker tool because I really enjoyed the flavor of the Sopranos but I can't enjoy them as much with the tight draw. I'm gonna work on opening up the draw up before I light another Soprano.
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    jd50aejd50ae Posts: 7,900 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Bob Luken:
    I've had a few CAO Sopranos and every one of them had a very tight draw. I'm on the lookout for a draw poker tool because I really enjoyed the flavor of the Sopranos but I can't enjoy them as much with the tight draw. I'm gonna work on opening up the draw up before I light another Soprano.


    That is what I mean. There are cigars that are manufactured tight and I am at a complete loss as to why.
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    Puff_DougiePuff_Dougie Posts: 4,599 ✭✭✭✭✭
    jd50ae:
    Bob Luken:
    I've had a few CAO Sopranos and every one of them had a very tight draw. I'm on the lookout for a draw poker tool because I really enjoyed the flavor of the Sopranos but I can't enjoy them as much with the tight draw. I'm gonna work on opening up the draw up before I light another Soprano.


    That is what I mean. There are cigars that are manufactured tight and I am at a complete loss as to why.
    I saw a draw poker tool at my B&M the other day and almost picked it up. The fact that they market such a device tells me that your assumption is true, JD... that there are cigars that are just rolled with a tight draw.
    "When I have found intense pain relieved, a weary brain soothed, and calm, refreshing sleep obtained by a cigar, I have felt grateful to God, and have blessed His name." - Charles Haddon Spurgeon
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    Gray4linesGray4lines Posts: 4,691 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Puff_Dougie:
    jd50ae:
    Bob Luken:
    I've had a few CAO Sopranos and every one of them had a very tight draw. I'm on the lookout for a draw poker tool because I really enjoyed the flavor of the Sopranos but I can't enjoy them as much with the tight draw. I'm gonna work on opening up the draw up before I light another Soprano.


    That is what I mean. There are cigars that are manufactured tight and I am at a complete loss as to why.
    I saw a draw poker tool at my B&M the other day and almost picked it up. The fact that they market such a device tells me that your assumption is true, JD... that there are cigars that are just rolled with a tight draw.
    Draw poker is the best investment you will ever make. If it saves one cigar ( it will) it's totally worth it. Look up " havana saver"
    LLA - Lancero Lovers of America
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    allsmokedupallsmokedup Posts: 751 ✭✭
    If you don't want to spring for a draw poker, a straightened large paper clip works, as does a thin ice pick. But yes, it is definitely an invaluable tool in a cigar smoker's kit.
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    Puff_DougiePuff_Dougie Posts: 4,599 ✭✭✭✭✭
    allsmokedup:
    If you don't want to spring for a draw poker, a straightened large paper clip works, as does a thin ice pick. But yes, it is definitely an invaluable tool in a cigar smoker's kit.
    I've also used a miniature Phillips screw driver (the kind you use on eyeglasses), but having a tool made specifically for cigars makes sense.
    "When I have found intense pain relieved, a weary brain soothed, and calm, refreshing sleep obtained by a cigar, I have felt grateful to God, and have blessed His name." - Charles Haddon Spurgeon
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    jlmartajlmarta Posts: 7,881 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Puff_Dougie:
    allsmokedup:
    If you don't want to spring for a draw poker, a straightened large paper clip works, as does a thin ice pick. But yes, it is definitely an invaluable tool in a cigar smoker's kit.
    I've also used a miniature Phillips screw driver (the kind you use on eyeglasses), but having a tool made specifically for cigars makes sense.


    I use a length of the thinnest diameter coat-hanger wire I could find. The trick, however, is an adaptation of the old carpenter's trick of blunting the point on it. A tapered point like an ice pick will actually help split the stogie whereas a square-cut end will not. Ask any long-time cabinetmaker if you don't believe me..... It works like a charm.
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    twistedstemtwistedstem Posts: 3,912 ✭✭✭✭✭
    jlmarta:
    Puff_Dougie:
    allsmokedup:
    If you don't want to spring for a draw poker, a straightened large paper clip works, as does a thin ice pick. But yes, it is definitely an invaluable tool in a cigar smoker's kit.
    I've also used a miniature Phillips screw driver (the kind you use on eyeglasses), but having a tool made specifically for cigars makes sense.


    I use a length of the thinnest diameter coat-hanger wire I could find. The trick, however, is an adaptation of the old carpenter's trick of blunting the point on it. A tapered point like an ice pick will actually help split the stogie whereas a square-cut end will not. Ask any long-time cabinetmaker if you don't believe me..... It works like a charm.
    My son smokes pipes I use his pipe tool poker works great.
    no matter where you go, there you are.

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    CigaryCigary Posts: 630
    allsmokedup:
    If you don't want to spring for a draw poker, a straightened large paper clip works, as does a thin ice pick. But yes, it is definitely an invaluable tool in a cigar smoker's kit.
    There are some very good draw tools on the market and I have about 4 of them. The best one has crochet like hooks on the rod that will latch onto the offending plug and you can pull it out and then you can smoke with impunity...there should never be a reason to throw away a cigar because of a plug...they can be fixed. Plugs aren't necessarily caused by manufacturers...a lot of times it's because of storage and RH that is too high/wet.
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    MartelMartel Posts: 3,306 ✭✭✭✭
    jd50ae:
    To me it is at least 50% of whether I like the smoke or not.

    What percentage do you give for draw..?
    I've never used a draw tool, but I have set aside cigars because of draw. I'm not going to say that it's 100% of my enjoyment, but it can be 100% of the reason I stop smoking a cigar. In other words, it can ruin it 100% on its own.

    If draw isn't ideal-it can be too easy or too hard-then it can lessen my enjoyment some. How much depends on the how bad it is. Too hard is more noticeable, but too easy causes the stick to burn too fast and has a more adverse effect on flavor.

    But, if draw is perfect, I may still hate the cigar for flavor or construction. I had this happen just last night with some unknown vitola and blend of a brand that gets enough bad press so I won't mention it here (but it rhymes with urkah). Flavor put it on that goat page from R&R threads, then it fell apart and started to unwrap. I had it happen over the weekend with a Montecristo Classic; it was just a forgettable smoke. Both had great draws.
    Intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

    I like Oliva and Quesada (including Regius) a lot.  I will smoke anything, though.
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    Thanatos0320Thanatos0320 Posts: 577 ✭✭✭
    If the draw is too tight or too loose then i can't focus on the flavors of the cigar. When it's too tight i have to constantly keep relighting it. When it's too loose it gets too hot and becomes very harsh. I prefer when the cigar is about 65%? It's really easy too take a pull off it but it still requires a little effort?
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    PAtoNHPAtoNH Posts: 429
    It's probably a mental thing for me but once I start correcting a cigar with a poker, I rarely enjoy what I end up with. Unless it's a very special cigar I'll generally accept that it's NG and I'll grab a new one from the humi.
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