Home Cigar 101

Aside from beetles, are higher storage temps OK otherwise?

Bob_LukenBob_Luken already sucked before joining forum,.....just sayin'.Posts: 7,673 ✭✭✭✭✭
I can't find much info about this specific question. Assuming you have used a freezing regimen that has killed any and all beetle, larvae and eggs, Are higher storage temperatures bad for your cigars for other reasons?

Or to word it another way, Is 70 degrees better than 80, 85 or 90 for any reason other that avoiding beetles?

(I have thought of mold, but higher RH is mostly responsible for that right? I keep most of my stuff around 65% to 67% RH. But what about proper aging and preserving the oils in the tobacco and all that stuff.)

Comments

  • CigaryCigary Posts: 630
    Unless you want a cigar that tends to be so humidified and you can barely light it or keep it lit anything over 70% just isn't the smart way to keep your cigars. The idea of keeping your cigars in an environment that is most closest to what they were before being harvested is what manufacturers are going to tell you...killing the larvae does take freezing and that takes about 3 days worth at a temperature that is as close to zero as you can get. 5c (41f) requires ~12 days (275 hours) 0c (32f) requires ~9 days (220 hours) -5c (23f) requires ~4 days (100 hours) -10c (14f) requires less than 24 hours -15c (5f) requires less than 24 hours -20c (-4f) requires less than 24 hours
  • Bob_LukenBob_Luken already sucked before joining forum,.....just sayin'.Posts: 7,673 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I would continue to keep my RH around 65%. I'm just wondering about higher coolidor temps in an area that will not be air-conditioned this summer. And I'm pretty confident that I have followed the proper freezing methods. So for example, except for beetles, would 65% RH and 90 degree temps be bad?
  • catfishbluezzcatfishbluezz Posts: 7,001
    My humi's regularly hit 85 degrees. Never had an issue. My travel humi sits in my truck almost all the time. Temps get over 100 all the time, probably closer to 110-120 in the cab. Never had an issue.


    Don't get me wrong, I have a wineador for all my isom to age properly at 60-65 degrees depending on age. But I do not think high temps will cause burn problems, or at least have not experienced any.
  • ChemnitzChemnitz Brad in Austin, TXPosts: 1,300 ✭✭✭
    I have wondered this question too, because during the summer months I keep my house at 78-80 degrees and therefore so are my humidors. I thought I read somewhere that cold temps slow down or inhibit the aging process for cigars. If that is true, would that mean that higher temps assist/quicken aging?
  • Lee.mcglynnLee.mcglynn HahahahaaaaaPosts: 5,993 ✭✭✭✭
    At higher temps I worry more about mold! Temp goes up rh goes down...I normally keep my stuff at 62-65 in the summer and the sticks sit at about 75 degrees at max. I've had more mold then beetle issues but I have very few of them. But yeah as catfish says 60/65 is what I like my winadors at sometimes even lower
    Money can't buy taste
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 5,172 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Interesting question. No doubt, as has already been pointed out, at least short durations of relatively high temps don't seem to be terribly harmful, but long term? I wonder. Everything happens faster at higher temperatures, doesn't it? So, breakdown of oils, cellulose, whatever, will happen quicker at higher temps than lower, or so it would seem to me. Just how high are you expecting these temperatures to be?
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as someone else's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • Bob_LukenBob_Luken already sucked before joining forum,.....just sayin'.Posts: 7,673 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Wasn't there a chart for absolute humidity calculations based on temperatures and hygrometer readings?
  • Bob_LukenBob_Luken already sucked before joining forum,.....just sayin'.Posts: 7,673 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Amos Umwhat:
    Interesting question. No doubt, as has already been pointed out, at least short durations of relatively high temps don't seem to be terribly harmful, but long term? I wonder. Everything happens faster at higher temperatures, doesn't it? So, breakdown of oils, cellulose, whatever, will happen quicker at higher temps than lower, or so it would seem to me. Just how high are you expecting these temperatures to be?
    I'm not sure. I'm guessing no higher than 90 but I really don't know. I'll do all I can to make room for them indoors but we'll see.
  • J.S.J.S. Posts: 754
    Bob Luken:
    Wasn't there a chart for absolute humidity calculations based on temperatures and hygrometer readings?
    Maybe somewhere but RH is really what you should follow. AH would not only be difficult to follow but could cause issues. As far as I know room temp. does not hurt anything although my aging humis do stay close to 70. My daily humi just sets on the desk. I have had no issues. But I would say if you start getting crazy with temp it could cause the oils to dry out quickly. Also, on a related note while some will take tins of pipe tobacco and let them sit in the window of a car in the summer to "age" I have found that this hurts the tobacco. G.L. notes that anything over 80 in tins long term would cause issues. That is comparing apples and oranges but long term I would make sure room temp at max.
  • CigaryCigary Posts: 630
    Followup on this: Temperatures need to be at a point where the tobacco isn't compromised. Yes, RH is more important but risking the tobacco where fluctuations are more than 10 degrees up and down can have an effect on the tobacco. The same with RH...you don't want it going up and down more than a few percentage points as that has an effect as well...split wrappers, etc. When the experts advise 70/70 they mean it...it's not just a 'general rule of thumb' but 70% can be higher than most will want to deal with so a lot of people will compromise with 65% which is fine. I know people will tell you that having your cigars at an outside temp of 80 to 90 degrees.....is ok...it isn't as you'd have to adjust the RH down to be proportionate to the outside extremes. I've watched my cigars for 40 years now and see what damage can be done with cigars that aren't put in a thriving environments...why else do you see so many issues with cigars in the Forums?
  • Gray4linesGray4lines KentuckyPosts: 4,503 ✭✭✭✭✭
    J.S.:
    Bob Luken:
    Wasn't there a chart for absolute humidity calculations based on temperatures and hygrometer readings?
    Maybe somewhere but RH is really what you should follow. AH would not only be difficult to follow but could cause issues. As far as I know room temp. does not hurt anything although my aging humis do stay close to 70. My daily humi just sets on the desk. I have had no issues. But I would say if you start getting crazy with temp it could cause the oils to dry out quickly. Also, on a related note while some will take tins of pipe tobacco and let them sit in the window of a car in the summer to "age" I have found that this hurts the tobacco. G.L. notes that anything over 80 in tins long term would cause issues. That is comparing apples and oranges but long term I would make sure room temp at max.
    Hmm, I hadn't heard of dashboard aging pipe tobacco. Baking yes, but I see how a relativel short 10-12 hr at 200 deg is a little different than a month at 100.
    LLA - Lancero Lovers of America
  • ChemnitzChemnitz Brad in Austin, TXPosts: 1,300 ✭✭✭
    Cigary:
    Followup on this: Temperatures need to be at a point where the tobacco isn't compromised. Yes, RH is more important but risking the tobacco where fluctuations are more than 10 degrees up and down can have an effect on the tobacco. The same with RH...you don't want it going up and down more than a few percentage points as that has an effect as well...split wrappers, etc. When the experts advise 70/70 they mean it...it's not just a 'general rule of thumb' but 70% can be higher than most will want to deal with so a lot of people will compromise with 65% which is fine. I know people will tell you that having your cigars at an outside temp of 80 to 90 degrees.....is ok...it isn't as you'd have to adjust the RH down to be proportionate to the outside extremes. I've watched my cigars for 40 years now and see what damage can be done with cigars that aren't put in a thriving environments...why else do you see so many issues with cigars in the Forums?
    Thanks for your comment. You got me thinking that I should look into a wineador for my next humidor so that I can control temperature as well as humidity. I had been leaning toward an end table type humidor not too worried about the seasonal temperature fluctuations in my house. Now if I can just recover from March Madness purchases...
  • CigaryCigary Posts: 630
    Chemnitz:
    Cigary:
    Followup on this: Temperatures need to be at a point where the tobacco isn't compromised. Yes, RH is more important but risking the tobacco where fluctuations are more than 10 degrees up and down can have an effect on the tobacco. The same with RH...you don't want it going up and down more than a few percentage points as that has an effect as well...split wrappers, etc. When the experts advise 70/70 they mean it...it's not just a 'general rule of thumb' but 70% can be higher than most will want to deal with so a lot of people will compromise with 65% which is fine. I know people will tell you that having your cigars at an outside temp of 80 to 90 degrees.....is ok...it isn't as you'd have to adjust the RH down to be proportionate to the outside extremes. I've watched my cigars for 40 years now and see what damage can be done with cigars that aren't put in a thriving environments...why else do you see so many issues with cigars in the Forums?
    Thanks for your comment. You got me thinking that I should look into a wineador for my next humidor so that I can control temperature as well as humidity. I had been leaning toward an end table type humidor not too worried about the seasonal temperature fluctuations in my house. Now if I can just recover from March Madness purchases...
    You are right in thinking about a wineador...most will use these for the reasons stated as they work great to keep RH and Temps where they need to be. Finding one at a good price point sure helps...find one that is thermoelectric..those are your best bet.
  • Darktower007Darktower007 Posts: 2,580 ✭✭✭✭
    I keep mine at 65 th and 71? or close to it. I try to inspect any cigar I buy, get in bundles etc. But so far..I've been fortunate and have had no beetle problems. When I do my monthly cigar rotation I also check each stick for tiny holes. Probably over kill what the hell.
Sign In or Register to comment.