Home Non Cigar Related

Yea it is from FOX NEWS..

jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,934 ✭✭✭✭✭
....and I really am not trying to upset anyone. But doesn't this scare you?



http://nation.foxnews.com/2014/05/28/south-won-civil-war-beach-babes-bomb-watters-world-memorial-day-quiz

Comments

  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 6,526 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thirteen years of mandatory education at twelve or fourteen grand per pupil and this is all you get. The brilliant compassionate progressive answer to which will be to tack on a couple more years of mandatory nursery school and throw more money at the other years. That ought to do it.

    Illiterate aborigines with sagas would have a better grasp of history.

    This crowd is who elected a meretricious bozo with high TVQ. Twice. Not to mention his **** predecessor.

    We do, however, lead the developed world in the self-esteem with which we systematically imbue our young people. So there is that, at least.

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • dr_frankenstein56dr_frankenstein56 Posts: 1,613 ✭✭✭
    Scary, no...

    but yes at the same time.

    it seems that in this day and age, it might be better to relabel a previous known saying of "Common sense" should be changed to "Uncommon sense" for the sheer fact that this kind of information is no longer held onto by the modern person.

    what really really frightens me about hearing and seeing these kind of things is that these are the people who make up the majority of voters and reproducers.

    Think real hard about it.

    BRAWNDO ----->>> It Has Electrolytes.

    Aj
  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,934 ✭✭✭✭✭
    webmost:
    Thirteen years of mandatory education at twelve or fourteen grand per pupil and this is all you get. The brilliant compassionate progressive answer to which will be to tack on a couple more years of mandatory nursery school and throw more money at the other years. That ought to do it.

    Illiterate aborigines with sagas would have a better grasp of history.

    This crowd is who elected a meretricious bozo with high TVQ. Twice. Not to mention his **** predecessor.

    We do, however, lead the developed world in the self-esteem with which we systematically imbue our young people. So there is that, at least.



    AMEN.

    So the question arises....since this seems to be the norm. I mean....articulated ignorance and blatant stupidity to say the least, and they are being turned out like loaves of bread, should those of us who care continue to care? Or is it becoming a lost cause?

  • wwhwangwwhwang Ottawa, ON, CanadaPosts: 2,878 ✭✭✭
    webmost:
    Thirteen years of mandatory education at twelve or fourteen grand per pupil and this is all you get. The brilliant compassionate progressive answer to which will be to tack on a couple more years of mandatory nursery school and throw more money at the other years.
    This. I can't tell you how many times I heard this while I was still living in the US. Throw more money at it! I keep telling people that the educational system itself has to be reformed and more competition in the educational system in the US needs to be encouraged. However, my more left-leaning friends and acquintances keep insisting that we're just being cheap with education.

    However, federal spending on education 30, 40, or even 50 years ago was much less than now and educational standards were much higher. The knee-jerk reaction is just to shout "throw more tax dollars at it", meanwhile, there are people now that somehow believe that the US is somewhere in Africa and that Genghis Khan was from India. My generation is f*cked.
  • pelirrojopelirrojo Farmington, NMPosts: 1,759 ✭✭✭
    webmost:
    Thirteen years of mandatory education at twelve or fourteen grand per pupil and this is all you get. The brilliant compassionate progressive answer to which will be to tack on a couple more years of mandatory nursery school and throw more money at the other years. That ought to do it.

    Illiterate aborigines with sagas would have a better grasp of history.

    This crowd is who elected a meretricious bozo with high TVQ. Twice. Not to mention his **** predecessor.

    We do, however, lead the developed world in the self-esteem with which we systematically imbue our young people. So there is that, at least.


    Take a look at the table at the top of the second page here. From the 2000 census to the 2010 census look at what population age groups did in the US. The two highest rates of growth were 45 to 64 and 65 and older, while the 18 to 44 sector was essentially stagnant. I would assume that the voting population is decent sample of the general population. So... How is it the young people's fault again?

    And as I'm sure you all are aware, the parents are almost solely at fault here. You can *** and moan about the education system all you want, but teachers do the best with what they have to work with. Parents don't hold up their end of the bargain, but it's fine they can just put the blame off on everyone else that's already doing their job for them, for meager wages I might add.

    Yes there are many idiots in the "millennial" generation, I will not argue against that. Honestly I can't stand the majority of people younger than myself. I also cannot stand listening to older people gripe about how awful that generation is. YOU RAISED THEM!!!
  • No_one21No_one21 Posts: 2,184 ✭✭✭
    pelirrojo:
    webmost:
    Thirteen years of mandatory education at twelve or fourteen grand per pupil and this is all you get. The brilliant compassionate progressive answer to which will be to tack on a couple more years of mandatory nursery school and throw more money at the other years. That ought to do it.

    Illiterate aborigines with sagas would have a better grasp of history.

    This crowd is who elected a meretricious bozo with high TVQ. Twice. Not to mention his **** predecessor.

    We do, however, lead the developed world in the self-esteem with which we systematically imbue our young people. So there is that, at least.


    Take a look at the table at the top of the second page here. From the 2000 census to the 2010 census look at what population age groups did in the US. The two highest rates of growth were 45 to 64 and 65 and older, while the 18 to 44 sector was essentially stagnant. I would assume that the voting population is decent sample of the general population. So... How is it the young people's fault again?

    And as I'm sure you all are aware, the parents are almost solely at fault here. You can *** and moan about the education system all you want, but teachers do the best with what they have to work with. Parents don't hold up their end of the bargain, but it's fine they can just put the blame off on everyone else that's already doing their job for them, for meager wages I might add.

    Yes there are many idiots in the "millennial" generation, I will not argue against that. Honestly I can't stand the majority of people younger than myself. I also cannot stand listening to older people gripe about how awful that generation is. YOU RAISED THEM!!!
    Agreed here. I generally detest people so I'm biased against those in the video, but I also understand that the video gives no real statistical information. Obviously they wouldn't put all the correct answering people in a video like this so who knows? Maybe 95% of those interviewed did as well as we all would like and the 5% who could be drunk, just out of school so their brains are off, TV shy, or you know... stupid.... are the ones actually shown.

    Just saying, yes it's funny, yes there are massive gaps in many people's knowledge we consider common, but don't take this video at face value.
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 6,526 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Teachers wages are not meager.

    Nor is there any other walk of life which has not had to figure out how to do more with less without ever making the excuse their failure to produce a result is the customer's fault.

    And, yes, we are the ungreatest generation. It pains me deeply; but I can't deny a bit of it. Look at the liberty and prosperity we inherited. Rapidly evaporating all round us.

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • raisindotraisindot BostonPosts: 1,311 ✭✭✭
    webmost:
    Thirteen years of mandatory education at twelve or fourteen grand per pupil and this is all you get. The brilliant compassionate progressive answer to which will be to tack on a couple more years of mandatory nursery school and throw more money at the other years. That ought to do it.

    Illiterate aborigines with sagas would have a better grasp of history.

    This crowd is who elected a meretricious bozo with high TVQ. Twice. Not to mention his **** predecessor.

    We do, however, lead the developed world in the self-esteem with which we systematically imbue our young people. So there is that, at least.



    As your idol Ronnie Reagan once said, "There you go again." These types of hand-picked summaries of Americans' ignorance have been going on for decades--I remember similar hand-wringing reports of historical ignorance back when I was in college in the Reagan era.

    And while I could just as easily counter your claim by saying that these ijiots probably voted for Tea Party candidates, I won't because, one) it can't be proven and two), people as ignorant as these morons probably didn't vote anyway, since they were probably too stupid to register in the first place and had no idea that an election was going on.

    Public school, private school, city school, northern school, southern school, city school, rural school education doesn't matter--a huge percentage of Americans have been ignorant since the nation was founded. At least back then you could explain ignorance because of lack of literacy, access to schools and books, and communication barriers. Today, with access to the world's history, ideas, inventions available at the click of a button, the fact that so many Americans know less about their own history than iron-age-level Afghanis know about theirs is the real tragedy here. That's not the fault of the education system--that's the fault of indulgent parents and a society that venerates narcissism, the cult of celebrity and the new and trendy over history and appreciation of the past. But, again, this has been going on for decades.

    In any case, as Noone21 points out, whether FOX, MSNBC or anyone else is running the story, extrapolating huge conclusions about young people's ignorance by interviewing a small sample of slackers on a beach isn't exactly research--especially since it's highly likely that FOX edited out those who answered the questions correctly.
  • The3StogiesThe3Stogies MainePosts: 2,653 ✭✭✭✭
    jd50ae:
    ....and I really am not trying to upset anyone. But doesn't this scare you?



    http://nation.foxnews.com/2014/05/28/south-won-civil-war-beach-babes-bomb-watters-world-memorial-day-quiz

    Watched that last night on O'Reilly, love the girl that thought we fought the french in every war. I have noticed a lack of interest in learning and discovering for yourself. I think I learned more out of school than in school, including college, but I am curious and want to figure things out for myself. With all the technology today you can research just about anything but kids don't even seem interested in looking things up themselves, they ask instead, then go back to texting. If I had the internet back then I would probably be,,,, aw *** right were I am now. Schools may have changed, parents may be too busy, and reading and writing will soon be a lost art. If you watch more of these Watters World's you will see immigrants know more about America than most Americans do, sad.
  • pelirrojopelirrojo Farmington, NMPosts: 1,759 ✭✭✭
    webmost:
    Teachers wages are not meager.

    A starting salary averaging 36k for a position that generally requires a Master's degree. Call me crazy but that doesn't make much sense. But, hey it's 12k more the poverty line for a family of four!
  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,934 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The3Stogies:
    jd50ae:
    ....and I really am not trying to upset anyone. But doesn't this scare you?



    http://nation.foxnews.com/2014/05/28/south-won-civil-war-beach-babes-bomb-watters-world-memorial-day-quiz

    Watched that last night on O'Reilly, love the girl that thought we fought the french in every war. I have noticed a lack of

    interest in learning and discovering for yourself. I think I learned more out of school than in school, including college, but I am curious and want to figure things out for myself. With all the technology today you can research just about anything

    . but kids don't even seem interested in looking things up themselves, they ask instead, then go back to texting. If I had the internet back then I would probably be,,,, aw *** right were I am now. Schools may have changed, parents may be too busy, and reading and writing will soon be a lost art. If you watch more of these Watters World's you will see immigrants know more about America than most Americans do, sad.


    That is a point that drives me crazy. I remember Mrs Griffith at Mt Vernon grade school in Alexandria, VA. She is 1 of 3 teachers I made a point of visiting after I got out of the military so I could thank them. After hugs all around she opened a desk drawer full of toys, games and you name it, she had confiscated from me in the 2 (I think) years she had me under her tutelage, poor lady. Eventually we got around to the question I wanted to ask, (I already knew the answer) 1st part was why did you become a teacher? It was kind of a long answer, but it boiled down to a simple thread, it was because she had had good teachers, and she wanted to give back. The 2nd part was "what is your job as a teacher"? Loved her answer, again boiled down. I can teach you to write and do math and I can teach you history. But to her, the biggest responsibility of all, was to teach me how to learn.

    All the teachers I remember had that same motivation.

  • macs-smokesmacs-smokes Posts: 587
    OK Peanut Crowd is going to chime in... I am not a teacher (I respect those that can teach/manage 10-30 children). My wife is a teacher. I without a degree make almost twice her salary. And the chart that Webby showed is top end of the teaching salary in KS. I know because my wife has not hit it yet with the pay freezes for 3+ years. I make more without a degree than a PHD in the public school system with 20+ years.

    My point here is two fold (1) with the current requirements and expectations of a teacher they are underpaid for the work they do. (2) Money is not the answer, the answer is less management.

    The classroom teacher who is with the children for 9 months out of the year. Has become the focus of the blame. But Education as a whole has become big business. Years ago the money that was earmarked for education went to actual education. Now it goes to several (I know we have 6-8 levels of "management" in Wichita.

    Our Education system has been corrupted by the Baby Boomers and Gen Xers. I am saying that the "Management" of education has become more important than the students. And our government has taken it upon itself to try to create a peasantry through ignorance... Ramble ON.
  • The3StogiesThe3Stogies MainePosts: 2,653 ✭✭✭✭
    jd50ae:
    I remember Mrs Griffith at Mt Vernon grade school in Alexandria, VA. She is 1 of 3 teachers I made a point of visiting after I got out of the military so I could thank them. After hugs all around she opened a desk drawer full of toys, games and you name it, she had confiscated from me in the 2 (I think) years she had me under her tutelage, poor lady. Eventually we got around to the question I wanted to ask, (I already knew the answer) 1st part was why did you become a teacher? It was kind of a long answer, but it boiled down to a simple thread, it was because she had had good teachers, and she wanted to give back. The 2nd part was "what is your job as a teacher"? Loved her answer, again boiled down. I can teach you to write and do math and I can teach you history. But to her, the biggest responsibility of all, was to teach me how to learn.

    That must have made her day. The desire to learn does seems to be going by the wayside and that is too bad. I have run into some of my old teachers too and some were shocked I had a degree, others were not. I dropped out of high school my senior year. The high school I attended pushed you into college prep classes, I assume, to get more accreditation and state money for the school. Freshman year you had to take these courses, sophomore others, etc. Some may not be ready or even want to take these classes, but you had to take certain ones, pass them, or stay back. Quite a few stayed back or dropped out. My sophomore year they let me take any class I wanted to as an experiment. I made honor role 1st semester, all A's and 1 B. Then skipped 2 months and stayed back, just to prove a point. I was stubborn. The desire to learn must be there, maybe the schools should work more closely with the individual student instead of a class or just follow a curriculum. Push them into things they are not ready for. When you are curious about something you learn it quicker, follow that thread. Some graduate high school in 3 years, some like me 5. My school was very overcrowded, 3 to a locker, but if you wanted to learn, you did. Self reliance seems to be going with this hand in hand. Teach a man to fish right.
  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,934 ✭✭✭✭✭
    macs-smokes:
    OK Peanut Crowd is going to chime in... I am not a teacher (I respect those that can teach/manage 10-30 children). My wife is a teacher. I without a degree make almost twice her salary. And the chart that Webby showed is top end of the teaching salary in KS. I know because my wife has not hit it yet with the pay freezes for 3+ years. I make more without a degree than a PHD in the public school system with 20+ years.

    My point here is two fold (1) with the current requirements and expectations of a teacher they are underpaid for the work they do. (2) Money is not the answer, the answer is less management.

    The classroom teacher who is with the children for 9 months out of the year. Has become the focus of the blame. But Education as a whole has become big business. Years ago the money that was earmarked for education went to actual education. Now it goes to several (I know we have 6-8 levels of "management" in Wichita.

    Our Education system has been corrupted by the Baby Boomers and Gen Xers. I am saying that the "Management" of education has become more important than the students. And our government has taken it upon itself to try to create a peasantry through ignorance... Ramble ON.


    Another AMEN. Remember when "management" of a school was done largely through parent teacher meetings? Remember when actual grades were important? Remember when teachers were respected? Remember when they allowed teachers to teach? And I am talking about grade school and high school where most of it happens. Now the xxxxxxx indoctrination centers have trickled down and stuck their progressive collective noses into everything and it ain't working. But Johnny feels good. Now have at it.....

Sign In or Register to comment.