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BigshizzaBigshizza Posts: 15,447 ✭✭✭✭✭
Owning a Chocolate Lab??? My wife and I visited 3 different shelters just looking for a new member of the family. We found a beautiful, energetic male who's just been altered. They said he was 5 but the guy there and myself believe he's around 2 years. The problem is we don't have a fenced yard. That's our first priority but this guy was so sweet and friendly but very strong and not leash trained. I shouldn't get him but I want to.. I'm stronger about this than my wife. She's never had kids or a pet..except as a child. Advice? Thanks!

Comments

  • MartelMartel Somewhere in PAPosts: 3,304 ✭✭✭✭
    My inlaws have two chocolate labs and another lab. Great dogs; both the ones I've met are rescues, but at a younger age than this. One nips at me, the other loves me when we visit. They live in AZ and have been through a lot of training for rattlesnake and colorado river toad avoidance.

    I don't really have much to advise you with except they can be trained even as adults. One of the two dogs I've met had to do its training multiple times for the rattlesnakes, but they both learned.
    Intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

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  • jgibvjgibv John G.Posts: 9,282 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Good on you for looking at rescues/wanting to adopt a dog Jim.

    Agree with Martel, any dog can be trained. It just takes time and patience, especially as the dogs get older if they've developed "bad" habits along the way.....but anything is possible.
    Labs are very smart.
    Check out books at your local library for training techniques, etc.


    Like most larger breeds, labs are more prone to joint problems like hip dysplasia, arthritis, etc especially as they get older. Best thing you can do to avoid issues though is keep him at a healthy weight.....


    Never had a chocolate lab, a good friend in HS had a female choc lab and it was one of the nicest dogs I've ever met, loved chasing squirrels/rabbits but they had never trained it not to.
    Family members have had black labs, very energetic even in their old age (10+ yrs old)....
    And in-laws all have chesapeake bays retrievers (similar to chocolates)....very very smart dogs. Extremely well trained and super obedient.

    * I have a new address as of 3/24/18 *

  • BigshizzaBigshizza Posts: 15,447 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I guess my issue is... I'm going for surgery and walk that well right now... I don't have a yard I can let him run around in... If I did he'd be here!! He's a sweetheart and I love dogs. But after I have surgery and re cooperation makes my wife the boss and I don't think she wants that... I'm sad...
  • jgibvjgibv John G.Posts: 9,282 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Bigshizza:
    I guess my issue is... I'm going for surgery and walk that well right now... I don't have a yard I can let him run around in... If I did he'd be here!! He's a sweetheart and I love dogs. But after I have surgery and re cooperation makes my wife the boss and I don't think she wants that... I'm sad...
    :-(


    Just my $0.02 --- if he has as much energy as you say he does, even if you had a yard I think it would be tough to handle and try to train "new" dog as you're recovering from surgery.

    Get the yard fenced in, and tell the wife you're going to find a local trainer and/or a doggie "bootcamp" course .....
    That might help your cause......

    * I have a new address as of 3/24/18 *

  • danielzreyesdanielzreyes Posts: 8,708 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I have many friends who's had or currently have chocolate labs. One thing I notice with them, they tend to mellow/chill out significantly as they get older.
    "It's plume, bro. Nothing to worry about. Got any Opus?" The suppose to be DZR
  • bbass2bbass2 Posts: 1,064 ✭✭
    Underground fences are a great option if you're concerned about the dog running off and/or don't want a privacy fence enclosing your yard. We had one installed when we got our pup a few months ago and after just a few training sessions she won't get close to that wire even with a strong temptation like chasing one of us or a ball that crosses the wire.
  • BigshizzaBigshizza Posts: 15,447 ✭✭✭✭✭
    bbass2:
    Underground fences are a great option if you're concerned about the dog running off and/or don't want a privacy fence enclosing your yard. We had one installed when we got our pup a few months ago and after just a few training sessions she won't get close to that wire even with a strong temptation like chasing one of us or a ball that crosses the wire.
    Good idea... I've thought about that..what kind of dog do you have?
  • 0patience0patience Oregon CoastPosts: 9,640 ✭✭✭✭✭
    bbass2:
    Underground fences are a great option if you're concerned about the dog running off and/or don't want a privacy fence enclosing your yard. We had one installed when we got our pup a few months ago and after just a few training sessions she won't get close to that wire even with a strong temptation like chasing one of us or a ball that crosses the wire.
    We got an underground fence with the lab that we had. It was one that the collar beep real fast just before it gave him a jolt.
    It takes a few days of training to get them to understand, but once they catch on, they can be at a full run and hear the beep and the brakes will lock up.
    The key with a lab is a lot of training, time and a lot of exercise.
    Labs can be a bit wound up, but can also be one of the most loyal dogs around.
    Great with kids and other animals.
    But you have to have time for them or they will chew the hell out of everything.
    A lot of training, positive reinforcement and work.
    The dog we have now will bow, put his hands up when you point your finger at him and roll over and die when you say bang. LOL!
    You can put a piece of beef jerky in front of him and he won't even attempt to take it until you say Okay.
    Did I say a lot of training? LOL!

    Here is a picture of his "bowing".

    image
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  • bbass2bbass2 Posts: 1,064 ✭✭
    Labradoodle. We wanted a lab, but my wife is allergic to dogs and having a dog that doesn't shed has been great for her. If you or your wife are still unsure about getting the dog you could contact a trainer in your area. I'm sure they would be glad to talk with someone before getting a dog to answer any questions or just ease concerns.
  • matkn293matkn293 O'Fallon, MOPosts: 3,604 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Chocolate labs are awesome. You can train them and keep them without a fence

    Life is too short to smoke bad cigars!!!

    Oh when the Blues, Oh when the Blues, Oh when the Blues go marching in!

    F San Jose!!!!! Lets get it on!

  • matkn293matkn293 O'Fallon, MOPosts: 3,604 ✭✭✭✭✭
    You can also get a ground anchor with a length of cable that will be suitable for the yard in the short time

    Life is too short to smoke bad cigars!!!

    Oh when the Blues, Oh when the Blues, Oh when the Blues go marching in!

    F San Jose!!!!! Lets get it on!

  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,934 ✭✭✭✭✭
    A Lab, black or blonde, like any dog needs exercise. But, they are extremely loyal and easy to train. They will exercise themselves if they are given enough yard to do so. They have great tempers and like kids and can be very protective. They are also one of the most popular "service" dogs, which points to their train ability and protective traits.

    Besides being one of the most popular dogs in this country, I personally believe that half the "mutts" in this country are part lab.

    They are great family dogs and like I said are very loyal. They are one of the most intelligent and eager to please breeds there is. I would not be afraid of getting a lab.

  • perkinkeperkinke Posts: 1,575 ✭✭✭
    Just to add a little to what's already been said, my family has always had at least one lab, my dad's choclate just died a few months ago but he still has a 5 year old yellow female. They are great dogs, generally really eager to please once they figure out what you want and are usually very social dogs. They're great hunters and swimmers but that hunting streak can make leash training a little challenging at times. The only thing with chocolates is that they are more prone to skin problems than black or yellow labs. My dad's didn't have any issues until she was 10 and some inexpensive meds took care of it for the most part. Oh, and jumping, we have had to break every one of ours from jumping on people, which with your surgery would be tough.
  • blutattooblutattoo Posts: 1,306 ✭✭✭
    I agree with everyone here. Labs are great. They do require a bit of exercise, but any training you do will be magnified due to their inbred instincts to serve. If you don't have a fence I'd be careful of leaving him outside. All of the labs I've had have a strong drive to chase prey, so squirrels, rabbits, birds, generally anything that runs from them, will cause them to chase unless they are trained specifically not to. I've had both chocolates and black labs and haven't really noticed a difference in temperament. They are prone to hip dysplasia once they get older so be prepared for expensive vet bills if you need to have his hip replaced $3k or more. Awesome beautiful dogs that will do everything you want them to do. They are a jack of all trades. Good luck.
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