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Oliva web page

I was looking at the oliva web page and found some interesting information regarding aging and storing of their different wrappers.

It would seem, according to them that maybe we have not been giving out such good advice in these matters. this is an excerpt from the page the link to the web page is at the bottom, makes for some good reading.

Aging ................................................................................................................ Aging is a complex process which requires special attention. While all cigars show some degree of maturity from additional aging, not all cigars age well. A common misconception is that a cigar which was rolled with “new” tobacco will lose its bite and harshness through humidor aging. No amount of humidor aging will mellow “new” or un-cured tobacco. “The best cigars for aging are those which were well balanced and enjoyable to being with.” Proper aging requires a designated humidor which will not be used for daily use. It should have a capacity that exceeds the amount of cigars to be aged by at least 20%. Cigars should be placed in the humidor without cellophane. Allow for space for the head and foot of the cigars evenly. The humidity source should be one that can exceed 70% humidity. Aging cigars should be kept at 70%-79% humidity depending on the thickness of the wrapper. Thicker wrappers require higher levels of humidity. Once desired age is achieved a cigar should be brought to 70% before smoking. Recommended Aging
High Primes (Thicker Wrappers) Maduro/Habano/Corojo/Habano 2000/Criollo/Sumatra/3-7 years
2-3 Primes (Medium Wrappers) Low Primes/Ecuador Connecticut/2-5 years
1st Cut (Thinner Wrappers) USA Connecticut/Cameroon/1-4 years

http://www.olivacigars.com/default.aspx

Comments

  • vankleekkwvankleekkw Posts: 404
    I was always under the impression that Maduro was a fermenting process not a species of tabacco plant. Also, thought that the primings were the different layers of the plant, not the species.
  • One2gofstOne2gofst Posts: 583
    vankleekkw:
    I was always under the impression that Maduro was a fermenting process not a species of tabacco plant. Also, thought that the primings were the different layers of the plant, not the species.


    Indeed it is a fermenting process. I also would never put my humidor at such a high level where it would be so easy to get mold and/or beetle problems. It is my understanding that by the time the cigar is rolled we aren't talking "new" tobacco anyhow and that it has already "aged". The additional humidor "aging" is actually the flavors blending.

    Interesting find though, for sure.
  • nsezellnsezell Posts: 294
    Maduro is a process, but it is only possible with the thicker leaves, so the lower primings. It is very hard on the leaves, so they have to be thick before the process is worth trying.
  • phobicsquirrelphobicsquirrel Posts: 7,347 ✭✭✭
    Nice post there laker. Good info, though I do notice difference in letting cigars sit over a period of months/years vs what they were like when they first came to my possession.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,633 ✭✭✭✭
    One2gofst:
    vankleekkw:
    I was always under the impression that Maduro was a fermenting process not a species of tabacco plant. Also, thought that the primings were the different layers of the plant, not the species.


    Indeed it is a fermenting process. I also would never put my humidor at such a high level where it would be so easy to get mold and/or beetle problems. It is my understanding that by the time the cigar is rolled we aren't talking "new" tobacco anyhow and that it has already "aged". The additional humidor "aging" is actually the flavors blending.

    Interesting find though, for sure.
    the primings that are discussed in the oliva article are what primings are used as wrapper leaf (generally speaking) from those types of tobacco. does that make more sense?


    i also disagree with the 71-79% RH thing. tobacco beetles can start to fly at 75% rH. and mold starts in at about 78%.
    god forbid your temp goes up.

    i do have an aging humidor. i open it maybe once a week. its at 65%. i have pulled some good smokes out of there after a year or two and they taste great.
  • gmill880gmill880 Posts: 5,947
    well since humi's capacity is measured in Cuban cigars maybe they meant 71-79 CUBAN rh/degrees ...I'm sorry ...had to do it !!!
  • laker1963laker1963 Posts: 5,046
    gmill880:
    well since humi's capacity is measured in Cuban cigars maybe they meant 71-79 CUBAN rh/degrees ...I'm sorry ...had to do it !!!


    Uh-huh...So how come I knew it would be you who "had to do it"? LOL
  • gmill880gmill880 Posts: 5,947
    laker1963:
    gmill880:
    well since humi's capacity is measured in Cuban cigars maybe they meant 71-79 CUBAN rh/degrees ...I'm sorry ...had to do it !!!


    Uh-huh...So how come I knew it would be you who "had to do it"? LOL

    Because you have the same warped sense of humor Doug !!!
  • phobicsquirrelphobicsquirrel Posts: 7,347 ✭✭✭
    gmill880:
    laker1963:
    gmill880:
    well since humi's capacity is measured in Cuban cigars maybe they meant 71-79 CUBAN rh/degrees ...I'm sorry ...had to do it !!!


    Uh-huh...So how come I knew it would be you who "had to do it"? LOL

    Because you have the same warped sense of humor Doug !!!
    lol...
  • Hawk55Hawk55 Posts: 846
    Aging seems to have quite a bit of "how to" involved. i was under the impression that high temps for long periods would promote beetle hatching, whereas hi humi would promote mold...
  • j0z3rj0z3r Posts: 9,403 ✭✭
    It's somewhat a combination of the two Hawk. Low temp and high humidity won't be as hospitable to mold or beetles as a high temp, high humidity environment, the same can be said about a low humidity, high temp situation.
  • madurofanmadurofan Posts: 6,219 ✭✭✭
    Yea I've noticed genrally that almost all consumers disagree with almost all manufacturers on "aging". If I've learned anthing in my 5000+ posts here its that aging, storing, cigars in general are personal.
  • YankeeManYankeeMan Posts: 2,546 ✭✭✭✭✭
    madurofan:
    Yea I've noticed genrally that almost all consumers disagree with almost all manufacturers on "aging". If I've learned anthing in my 5000+ posts here its that aging, storing, cigars in general are personal.
    I agree. I don't get real exotic in my aging. I have two humidors for regular smokes. When I get an order, I split it in half and put some in each humi. I smoke out of one and leave the other to age. I leave them rest in the smoking one for at least two weeks to a few months. The aging humi holds them for much longer, maybe a year or so depending on how many I smoke out of the smoking humi.

    I also have a small humidor for flavored cigars and I think I read here or someplace that flavored cigars don't age, so I just smoke them when I feel that I want a flavored smoke.
  • laker1963laker1963 Posts: 5,046
    I found the info. interesting in many area's. One in particular about the RH/TEMP. for aging sticks. It does make some logical sense since the aging process is really just more curing of the tobacco's which would logically need slightly elevated temps. and moisture (RH) for the process to continue.

    It made sense to me, and I assumed the Oliva folks must be very certain that they have already erradicated the beetle problem. I mean think about it... would a Cigar Manufacturer of their calibre and status risk losing their reputation and SALES by having erronious information on their web page regarding the care and storage of their cigars?

    I've got some Series V Maduro's coming from a double box split / trade with Pheebs. I think I will set a few aside and give them the OLIVA treatment.

    It will be a while before I report back on this so, it probablly won't be much help to most members here today.
  • phobicsquirrelphobicsquirrel Posts: 7,347 ✭✭✭
    Have you had an 08 maddy?
  • laker1963laker1963 Posts: 5,046
    phobicsquirrel:
    Have you had an 08 maddy?
    Nope. I was not able to find any before you guys bought them all up !
  • TheedgeTheedge Posts: 316

    I've gone high tech.  I place the newer cigars on the bottom of the humidor, and then place a piece of paper on top of them with the date I recieved them written on it...

    I might be just imagining things - but the burn just seems more even after they sit in my humidor for about a month.

     

     

  • camgfscamgfs Posts: 968

    Aging my cigars?


    I agree witht he personal choice in how to "age" your personal cigars. I'm sure there is a proper system used by the different companies, but for my humi(s) I like to make sure any cigar I smoke has sat for at least 3 weeks.


    Having said that, I do have quite a selection of smokes that are from 1 1/2 to 3 1/2 years old from their "box date". Mostly Maduros and anything Cuban. I find that they age well as long as I remember to rotate the cigars once a month. By 'age well', I mean that the burn improves and they don't loose any flavour, but seem like they taste better.


    I don't tend to age anything "vintage", like the Rocky Patel vintage 1990, which states that is is "guaranteed aged 12 years". I figure those are way overdue to be smoked.



  • laker1963laker1963 Posts: 5,046
    laker1963:
    I was looking at the oliva web page and found some interesting information regarding aging and storing of their different wrappers.

    It would seem, according to them that maybe we have not been giving out such good advice in these matters. this is an excerpt from the page the link to the web page is at the bottom, makes for some good reading.

    Aging ................................................................................................................ Aging is a complex process which requires special attention. While all cigars show some degree of maturity from additional aging, not all cigars age well. A common misconception is that a cigar which was rolled with “new” tobacco will lose its bite and harshness through humidor aging. No amount of humidor aging will mellow “new” or un-cured tobacco. “The best cigars for aging are those which were well balanced and enjoyable to being with.” Proper aging requires a designated humidor which will not be used for daily use. It should have a capacity that exceeds the amount of cigars to be aged by at least 20%. Cigars should be placed in the humidor without cellophane. Allow for space for the head and foot of the cigars evenly. The humidity source should be one that can exceed 70% humidity. Aging cigars should be kept at 70%-79% humidity depending on the thickness of the wrapper. Thicker wrappers require higher levels of humidity. Once desired age is achieved a cigar should be brought to 70% before smoking. Recommended Aging
    High Primes (Thicker Wrappers) Maduro/Habano/Corojo/Habano 2000/Criollo/Sumatra/3-7 years
    2-3 Primes (Medium Wrappers) Low Primes/Ecuador Connecticut/2-5 years
    1st Cut (Thinner Wrappers) USA Connecticut/Cameroon/1-4 years

    http://www.olivacigars.com/default.aspx
    BUMP.
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