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Must rest

AlbinfkAlbinfk Posts: 1,923 ✭✭✭✭✭
Like a lot of the new guys me included it's tough watching a cigar rest. That being said I see the need to start the coolidor (s) and getting a rotating stock going so there will be plenty of aged cigars at hand. Question for the veteran cigar smokers is are there any MUST have rest cigars that you can share. I'm not talking about the cigars that are impossible to get or outrageously priced ones.

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    0patience0patience Posts: 10,665 ✭✭✭✭✭
    That's a tough question to answer.
    I like to age quite a few of the cameroon cigars I have and have a bunch of cigars that have quite a bit of age on them, not so much because I chose to, but because I put off smoking them, because of one reason or another.

    And probably for each person who answers, each answer may be a little different.
    I have a ton of aged Torano cigars, but mostly because I like Torano cigars.


    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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    peter4jcpeter4jc Posts: 15,601 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The easier answer, Al, is what cigars are better if you don't age/rest them.  I haven't found any that don't get better after a month and even better after six months.

    I hear tell, that the Liga Privadas start to lose some yumminess after a year, but from what I can gather, a year won't hurt 99.9% of cigars.
    "I could've had a Mi Querida!"   Nick Bardis
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    CharlieHeisCharlieHeis Posts: 8,204 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Don Pepin Garcia Blue is the first one that comes to mind. Oliva V and My Father are also on my list to always have on hand so they can get a little age before I burn em.
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    genareddoggenareddog Posts: 4,072 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Make sure to post pocs of the coolidor 
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    Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat Posts: 8,500 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Don Pepin Garcia Blue is the first one that comes to mind. Oliva V and My Father are also on my list to always have on hand so they can get a little age before I burn em.
    Agree on these, would add Padilla 1932, Sol Cubano Cuban Cabinet, and the DPG Cuban Classic.
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    Bob_LukenBob_Luken Posts: 10,148 ✭✭✭✭✭
    My definition of rest would be a few weeks to a month. Cigars in transit can sometimes undergo temperature swings that require a stable environment for a few weeks to overcome those effects. Cigars that I bring home from my B&M do not require any rest unless I let them get too hot because I forgot to take them out of the truck. 

    Age on the other hand, (A couple of years) happens by accident. Or should I say, it happens while I'm not paying any attention. And it happens as a result of buying more than I smoke. 

    Al,  I just took a look at what I sent you and all except the La palina red had about a year on them. The 601 blue may have had a little more. Some of my stuff has stickers with a date. That would be more reliable than my memory. 

    I have older stuff that I can part with. I have your addy. :)
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    ChazMNChazMN Posts: 53 ✭✭
    YankeeMan said:
    Whenever I get an order, I immediately split it between my regular humidors and my aging one.  This way, I get to smoke the new order pretty soon and I let half age.
    So what humidity and temp do you keep your aging humi at?
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    reggie713reggie713 Posts: 2,517 ✭✭✭✭
    Olivia master blend 3's age well imo
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    PatrickbrickPatrickbrick Posts: 7,774 ✭✭✭✭✭
    reggie713 said:
    Olivia master blend 3's age well imo
    Oh, yes they do, so does the my father 1922.
    "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give".  Winston Churchill.
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    AlbinfkAlbinfk Posts: 1,923 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Very good stuff.
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    BigDaddyBigDaddy Posts: 124 ✭✭✭
    All good stuff guys. 
    Danny B
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    Lee.mcglynnLee.mcglynn Posts: 5,960 ✭✭✭✭
    Resting and aging are very different...I believe every cigar does good with rest. While aging some don't do as well as others. It's a personal matter but it's all trial and error
    Money can't buy taste
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    JSaintJSaint Posts: 1,879 ✭✭✭
    Agreed with Lee.  I age a lot of my full flavor cigars.  I feel that a lot of the mild or medium might not benefit as much.  I rest every cigar I have but I have broken the ROTT rule once or twice lol.  
    "Beauty is in the eye when you hold her." -Ricky
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    YankeeManYankeeMan Posts: 2,654 ✭✭✭✭✭
    ChazMN said:
    YankeeMan said:
    Whenever I get an order, I immediately split it between my regular humidors and my aging one.  This way, I get to smoke the new order pretty soon and I let half age.
    So what humidity and temp do you keep your aging humi at?
    RH at 67%, temp at 65.
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    rsherman24rsherman24 Posts: 6,838 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Diesel UHC.  Great cigars after a year, even better with 2-3 years rest
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    90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Posts: 12,408 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Diesel UHC.  Great cigars after a year, even better with 2-3 years rest
    Spot on, just tripped across a UHC short torpedo with 3+ years on it... will be looking for that one soon.

    A very "rough" rule of thumb is that the higher the ligero content of the cigar the better it will age as it is much harder for it to lose so much kick and strength that it loses what makes it so good. Not to say that you can't age it too long, but it becomes much harder to do. Whereas connecticuts and ones like those don't general benefit from a lot of age since they are already so mild. For most people rest is 0-24 months of so, where "age" comes in 2+ years or longer, but each person seems to have their own distinction and definition.

    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
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    90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Posts: 12,408 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Lee, I think you might agree with me that the one of the few that no matter what I lay down for at least 2 years or longer is any Anejo or Opus. They use to come out with a lot more age on them from the factory, but with all the demand and market and I am sure many other factors ($$$) those two blends especially are released much younger than they used to be and really are in need of true age before they come into their own and are magnificent. Maybe I am alone in this thought, but an Opus gets WOW for me after 3-4 years of age.

    Brett
    Resting and aging are very different...I believe every cigar does good with rest. While aging some don't do as well as others. It's a personal matter but it's all trial and error


    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
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    Lee.mcglynnLee.mcglynn Posts: 5,960 ✭✭✭✭
    Lee, I think you might agree with me that the one of the few that no matter what I lay down for at least 2 years or longer is any Anejo or Opus. They use to come out with a lot more age on them from the factory, but with all the demand and market and I am sure many other factors ($$$) those two blends especially are released much younger than they used to be and really are in need of true age before they come into their own and are magnificent. Maybe I am alone in this thought, but an Opus gets WOW for me after 3-4 years of age.

    Brett
    Resting and aging are very different...I believe every cigar does good with rest. While aging some don't do as well as others. It's a personal matter but it's all trial and error


    Agreed! Opus use to be age two years prior to shipping. The barn fire happened and the demand is too high so no more resting at the factory for such times. I have had some 3&4 yr old fuente Fuentes that were incredible and I always buy a bunch when the b&m's get them in. It's hard not to smoke them rott but if you buy enough why not. Anejos to me are just great no matter what! Some years vary like last years sharks got bitter and acrid towards the end but on the other side of things usually you just can't go wrong with that line at any age. I do prefer the 46,50&77's the most but I haven't had one I didn't enjoy for the most part. I'm still waiting to fire up the opus maduro from 07 that one of the guys bombed me with...I've got it nice and sealed for that special day!!
    Money can't buy taste
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    90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Posts: 12,408 ✭✭✭✭✭
    For sure Lee, absolutely spot on! I have a Portages 155th Anniversary Salomon from a dinner with Castro gifted by an old cigar lounge owner, as well as a 08' Forbidden X Lancero that I am just waiting for th right time to light those two, just have to find what is that magical "right time" haha

    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
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    YaksterYakster Posts: 26,067 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @peter4jc said:
    The easier answer, Al, is what cigars are better if you don't age/rest them.  I haven't found any that don't get better after a month and even better after six months.

    I've heard Patrick say that the Oliva Melanio Vs are best fresh.

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    MrPossumMrPossum Posts: 503 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I let an EP Carrillo Oscuro rest for a while after the first one was a bust, and it was amazing

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