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Car, Truck and Bike Project Thread

90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
Hey Gang,

Before I a long post and all that stuff wanted to test the water and see if anyone actually would have an interest in a thread like this?

Basically anytime you have a car or truck or bike or other internal combustion engine project, whether it is just to share, or to ask for help, you would post it here.

Sound like something y'all might use and enjoy?

Brett
"When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."

Comments

  • 0patience0patience Oregon CoastPosts: 10,399 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I deal with all that at work. Why would I want to talk about here? ROFL!
    Then again, I suppose I do have a little knowledge I could share.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    HAHAHA can always count on you to bust my balls as well as make me laugh like an idiot too :P

    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well for those of you that know me, then you know how much of a gearhead I am, for those of you that don't well I was a professional automotive mechanic for just shy of a decade before having to switch professions and go to work for Apple due to complicated health issues. Even though I work for Apple now, I have never lost my love of turning a wrench. With moving to a new home I finally have my own garage space and have setup a workshop where I am elbows deep in a bike project right now. 


    I love hearing what projects others are up to and what they are doing as well as learning from and helping other projects too, so this is a place to share what you have going on as well as ask for some advice and help to see if any of us are able to assist ;)



    So without further ado here is my project, please bear in mind those that know me know that I ramble and am quite longwinded, if long reads with a lot of backstory isn't your thing I encourage you to skip ahead or look elsewhere so that I do not trouble you...


    1985 Kawasaki GPz750 with 16,000 original miles on it. In 1985 the GPz was at the apex of what the UJM and Kawasaki air cooled inline four engine could be at. This was 31 years ago and even today they are still some impressive machines and can still do some extraordinary things. In 1986 the GPz750 made a milestone change by changing from being air cooled to being liquid cooled and adding a radiator and cooling passages for the first time, the other milestone change is that they changed the name from GPz to Ninja and for the first time in this series of bikes and engines, the infamous Kawasaki Ninja was born, so it is not inaccurate to say that my bike is the original Ninja and helped to start the Superbike craze that is still going strong in the USA. 


    I picked up this bike in a rather unique way, bit of history needs to be explained here to understand how I came into possession of this killer ride. This past December, Pops' finally retired from IBM after 35 years of soul-sucking servitude to that monstrosity and founded his own company called Klassy Kaws LLC where he buys, restores, and makes projects out of old UJM bikes (Universal Japanese Motorcycles, Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki and Yamaha at that time all made bikes that for the most part were almost interchangeable with each other and were hence labeled as UJM) and specifically Kawasaki's. A few years prior to this for Father's Day, Ma with the help of Pops' brother and myself located Pops' all time favorite bike and one he used to have and ride back in high school when him and Ma were dating, a 1979 Kawasaki SR650, one of the first "Factory custom" bikes that came out of Japan. He got that bike and within a few years he had accumulated 5 old Kawasaki's in the garage and was rebuilding, restoring and selling them etc.

    Here is the bike in 100% stock trim right before I took delivery of it:




    Last year for Father's Day my wife Amanda ended up getting me motorcycle classes so that I could get my motorcycle endorsement and ride with my Father. I had been into bikes and wanted one for a long time, but I also knew that at that time I was too immature and irresponsible and it was nearly a certainty that if I had a bike I would end up paralyzed or dead by getting too excited and doing something stupid. Fast forward to being married for nearly 5 years and being a Father of a special needs child, and I had matured and calmed enough that I could ride responsibly and safely because I could never forget that I had a family to support and take care of, and that weight of responsibility on my shoulders was a constant reminder to not do something stupid and become a statistic. Pops being who he is demanded that I didn't buy a bike or any gear at the moment and to let him supply everything until I got a feel for bikes and knew what I wanted and could pick out something myself. So on Father's Day proper we hopped in the Trans Am and drove a few hours out to Nebraska and picked up a super low mileage survivor 1982 Kawasaki KZ440 LTD with 10K original miles and 100% stock (you just don't find those examples almost ever anymore fyi), and so I spent a month or two learning on that bike and building my confidence and skills. Quickly I "Graduated" and started riding his 79' SR650 regularly instead, and at the time when that bike first came out, there was no bike from any manufacturer for 2+ years less than 800cc that could take the SR650, it was that hot of a bike for a little 638cc air cooled inline 4 engine. I can tell you that it was a lot of bike for me so early on but it was also an amazing machine and one that I want to get myself eventually down the road, absolutely still adore that bike! Around that time, late summer early Fall of last year one of Pops' friends bought that black 1985 GPz750 with 15,000 original miles. He was a member like Pops of a forum for the KZ650's which Pops' SR650 is, and when this gentlemen bought the GPz he quickly realized that it was too much bike for him at his age and place in life and he plain and simple would get in too much trouble and into too many bad situations and decided to sell it to avoid that. Pops bought the bike and in September (I believe) took delivery of it. Ever since I first saw that bike I knew that is the style of bike I wanted to ride, and shortly after Pops bought it and we would ride together I would get some turns on it and was absolutely addicted. Started shopping for my own bike and found a few other great examples, it was about that time that Pops approached me and asked if I would rather buy that one straight from him, I quickly answered yes and that I hadn't asked as I wouldn't want to put him in a difficult spot since I knew he was concerned about me being on such a powerful bike while still being so new to motorcycles in general. We made a deal to purchase the bike and this past March the money changed hands and I took delivery of the bike.


    Here is the bike I learned to ride on last Father's Day, just after we got back from picking it up out of state: 



    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This bike is 31 years old now and hadn't been regularly ridden for many years. When Pops first took delivery there were a few issues that he and I started to address, the two main ones being issues idling/accelerating as well as the gas tank being completely rusted and rotted through and needing replacement. The tank situation had been temporarily by using a product called Red Kote to coat the tank, and after I bought the bike from Pops we completely blew apart the 4 carbs, put em through the ultrasonic cleaner and fully rebuilt them with original Kawasaki parts and reinstalled everything again. Several other small upgrades were made, changed out all of the fuel lines for tygon lines which are ultra flexible, and are ethanol resistant since these old machines were never intended to run with ethanol enriched gas as the ethanol destroys the soft rubbers parts of these motorcycles and fuel systems. We also modified the fuel feed with a brass T to avoid a partial kink in the fuel feed that is notorious on these bikes and can cause a lean-out condition which I experienced a few times. We also put in an inline fuel filter to help catch anything that comes through fro the rusted Red Kote'd tank. Once that was taken care of the bike ran like a banshee, now I just needed to go through all the systems and make sure that things like brakes, clutch, suspension, chain etc are all up to snuff and safe. Flushed out all the brakes re-bled them and now the brakes are solid, checked and cleaned and lubed the chain, set tolerances from the clutch end play, tires and all that good stuff. That took us to a solid, reliable and safe bike that I have been riding since.


    That being said there are a number of other things that I have done, some small others bigger since then a well as what I am doing now. So here is a brief (for me at least :P ) list of upgrades and changes for this resto-mod of what I have been up to so far on the GPz, and yes I ended up naming her (yes its a her dammit and she loves to be ridden hard and fast hehehe) and so she ended up with the moniker of "Saya", due to her being a sexy Japanese babe and is always saying “sayanara sucker” to anyone that tests her hahaha.


    Updates:

    1. New grips, RVGS Series Red/Black
    2. Billet Aluminum petcock conversion kit to change from vacuum to manual shut off to avoid any hydrolock issues of a leaky petcock 
    3. New bar ends modified by me to fit stock clip ons
    4. Replacement gas tank from a donor 85 black GPz, has two dents but no paint damage like current one and dents can be removed with pointless dent repair, that tank should go on in the next few weeks
    5. Increased primary and pilot jets to accommodate more flow with K&N high performance air filter
    6. Restored all plastics and inner fairing pieces that were faded and chalked back to showroom like condition
    7. Designed and templated a custom aluminum rear fender eliminator kit, sent off to friend in New England to build and fabricate and send back to me, should be back within the next 2-3 weeks and I can upgrade the lights and deceleration module that I designed to work with my fab job
    8. Currently in process of stripping and sanding the entire engine and casings as well as exhaust to refinish and paint and restore engine finish and exhaust finish. - DONE!
    9. Installed Denali Sound Bomb air horn so cagers don't kill me, 120 dB at 6' away. Seen a few drivers try to merge into my lane and I light up that horn and suddenly they need to go to the car wash to clean out their interior since they totally crapped their pants lol


    Many more things planned, but for a while now I will just be removing pieces of the bike, and restoring and refinishing them to look like it was showroom quality again. I have several plans for upgrades over time, just have to build it up now. 

    Here is about where it sits now:






    Just wrapped up painting the exhaust and engine, and am finishing up today repainting the rear mud guard on the front fender since it was faded and an eyesore… again. 


    Thats about it for the moment, figured I wasted a lot of y’alls time and many of you have drudged through the long winded rambling nature of my typing, thanks for reading and hope y’all enjoyed :)


    Brett

    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    I'd like to know if changing out my own oil and oil filter on my bike is something I can do myself. I've done it on cars many times but not a motorcycle.

    My first "service" is coming up and I don't know if I should have the dealer do it the first time, then I would do the oil/oil filter myself after that or just have them do it all,
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Hey James, first off I can nearly promise that yes you can. To be sure though I would need to know the year, make and model of your bike then I can dig it up and help walk you through it.

    BTW, lighting up my first cigar (besides herfing with Ben a week ago) in months to celebrate FINALLY quitting smoking cigarettes and I am going to light up the Zino Make of LA from the box you sent me a while back. Wanted to say thanks as I have been resting them this entire time, and was thinking of ya :)

    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    2016 Honda CB500FA is my bike. My service is at 600 miles and I'm at 425 miles right now. I'm thinking of having them do the first service since I sometimes have shifting issues (won't leave second gear -up or down - even after turning it off/on). I heard/read they can fix those. The filter is in an easy to see and reach place.

    Nice. I hope you like the cigars Brett!.
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thanks James I have no doubt that I will and congrats on the bike! Those are some fun little machines and very zippy, keep the rubber side down though :P

    Will let you know shortly the oil, filter and quantity you need should be pretty darned simple to do if you want to yourself, or can easily have the shop do it at your normal service interval too  :)

    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited June 2016
    @James40 so found some info for you.

    First off you need 3 qts of your oil of choice, not sure what you use or prefer but at least for my 31 year old air cooled Kawi I just use regular Rotella 15w-40 diesel oil, its cheap and its moto approved and nearly indestructible plus it has more of the ZDDP additives that are so helpful and good for engines. That being said my bike is much older than yours, is air cooled, and still uses flat tappet cams that need that ZDDP additive, whereas roller cams in most modern engines are not as delicate. Whatever you use just keep it consistent and service at any intervals that come up, and if you get past those I recommend changing oil every 1000-2000 miles depending on how cautious you are. I do mine normally 1500-200 miles to be on the extra safe side, but I also ride hard and do a lot of canyon carving and knee dragging.

    Your oil filter you need is OEM Honda part number 15410-MFJ-D01, and a 12mm wrench and oil catch can.

    Here is a pretty slick post/how-to for your exact bike (just a few years earlier than yours, 2013) that should benefit you if you are wanting to learn and do it yourself too :)

    http://www.cbr500riders.com/forum/how-forum/757-how-change-oil-your-2013-cbr500r-cb500f-x.html

    Hope this helps brother ;)

    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • genareddoggenareddog South eastern indianaPosts: 3,585 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @james40 I would definitely run the the Honda gn4 10w30 in it for awhile. Very easy to change yourself. 
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    Thanks guys. I do want to throw a bone to the dealer so I'm going to take it in for the first service and go from there.
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    ^^^ Great advice ;)

    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • blutattooblutattoo Posts: 1,306 ✭✭✭
    @james40 I don't own a Honda, but I bought the service manual for my bike performed the first service without ever having touched a motorcycle before and it was easy peasy. Easier than my car that's for sure. Just make sure you aren't going to void the warranty for skipping the first service.

    Oh and congrats on the new bike. Wish you were a bit closer and we could for a ride together.
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Jason man it's been ages how the hell are ya brother?! Great to see you man and hope you and the family are doing well!

    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • blutattooblutattoo Posts: 1,306 ✭✭✭
    Jason man it's been ages how the hell are ya brother?! Great to see you man and hope you and the family are doing well!

    Brett
    Doing good brother. Super busy with fam and kids and life. Not as much time to check in here. Miss hanging here though. Hope all is well! 
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Do the bump-alump 
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2016
    Well yesterday I spent the day over in Pops' shop installing and fanning up my new custom rear fender eliminator and new LED tail light with integrated turn signals. Took me better part of the day with all the wiring and fabrication work but came out fantastic. Still need to get an LED flasher relay as the turn signals flash too fast for my liking but other than that and needing to relocate the license plate came out great!

    Before:


    After:






    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Few more pics:





    brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • TNBigfoot68TNBigfoot68 Where Bigfoots live, in the woodsPosts: 2,325 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Brett that's a sweet bike.   I guess I'll be the odd ball, I have a1999 Chevy Mont Carlo i want to restore for my son who is 9 and give it to him when he is 16. It's my daily driver four now and needs a lot of restoring. The heads have been rebuilt but needing paint and Interior refurbished badly and Lots of electrical issues with door locks Windows and cruise control not working. 
    Here are my thoughts
    1 replace cracked dash replace lights in instrument cluster 
    2 replace wiring for locks and Windows
    3 carpeting
    4 radio and sound upgrade
    5 paint and minor body scratches but body is straight
    6 have transmission rebuilt
    7 Fix cruise
    I figured that would be a good start
    I know this is not a collectable year yet but I love ole red. Love to hear your thoughts 
    I was born a fool, and just got bigger!
  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 14,868 ✭✭✭✭✭
    just installed an omni evelo front wheel on my wife's bicycle (she's severely asthmatic and has trouble cycling with me). Well, the thread does say bikes, lol.
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think that's a great way to help get your wife cycling with you Edward and your co tircution is certainly welcome by me and all I am sure, way to go!
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
  • 90+_Irishman90+_Irishman Loveland, COPosts: 12,440 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Brett that's a sweet bike.   I guess I'll be the odd ball, I have a1999 Chevy Mont Carlo i want to restore for my son who is 9 and give it to him when he is 16. It's my daily driver four now and needs a lot of restoring. The heads have been rebuilt but needing paint and Interior refurbished badly and Lots of electrical issues with door locks Windows and cruise control not working. 
    Here are my thoughts
    1 replace cracked dash replace lights in instrument cluster 
    2 replace wiring for locks and Windows
    3 carpeting
    4 radio and sound upgrade
    5 paint and minor body scratches but body is straight
    6 have transmission rebuilt
    7 Fix cruise
    I figured that would be a good start
    I know this is not a collectable year yet but I love ole red. Love to hear your thoughts 
    Hey brother sounds like a great project and certainly something that with time, patience and hard work can be done! Carpeting is rather easy just buy a reproduction from something like Year One and put her in! Wiring is harder but doable, getting a few tools like a multimeter are a must! A wire stripper, crimpers and a solder gun is a must too. The dash can sometimes be found in junk yards but that's a crap shoot. Often times switches go bad but using a multimeter to pin it out and find out if the switch is good or not is a great starting point, sometimes it's the wiring and others it's the switch itself. Transmission work I always recommend leaving to the pros it's just too easy to totally F that up. Paint and body can go either way. I've done it myself several times and it's easily the most labor intaensive and mind numbing work there is. Not hard but OMG labor intensive and brutal on the hands and body, sometimes it's just best to cut your loses and take it to a paint shop but money is what makes that determination. If you do all the bodywork and then just take it to them to spray the paint that can be much cheaper and something I've done before. Hope this gives you some starting points. 

    Brett
    "When walking in open territory bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask them to stop. If they do not stop, destroy them."
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