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I am so freaking disappointed

RhamlinRhamlin WVPosts: 8,715 ✭✭✭✭✭
I've all but finished reading what I've come to think of as one of the best books I've ever read. Other than the Holy Bible.  3 Cups of Tea. I mean this book has touched me like no other. Completely reshaping my thoughts about Muslims. Then I make the mistake of Googleing the authors name Greg Mortenson. And the news just shatters me. If maybe half the book is true he's still an amazing man. But now it's looking like he was more con artist then philanthropist. 
 I'm curious what books has anyone read that really affected them and the way they perceive the world?

Comments

  • 0patience0patience Oregon CoastPosts: 10,399 ✭✭✭✭✭
    This may sound odd, but the Hudson Bay Fur Trader Journals of my Great-great Grandfather. I was almost able to see what he did as an Indian guide for Hudson Bay and John Jacob Astor from day to day.

    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
  • RhamlinRhamlin WVPosts: 8,715 ✭✭✭✭✭
    0patience said:
    This may sound odd, but the Hudson Bay Fur Trader Journals of my Great-great Grandfather. I was almost able to see what he did as an Indian guide for Hudson Bay and John Jacob Astor from day to day.

    Sounds pretty darn cool to me. 
  • EchambersEchambers B'Ham Posts: 4,178 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I read a book called Nisa written by an anthropologist about a a Massai  women.  Most books in both history and anthropology tell about the life of men.  this book told about the life of a women.  it really shifted how I thought about culture and history and encouraged me to be more critical of the perspective of the writer.  
    -- "There's something that doesn't make sense. Let's go poke it with a stick."
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 7,348 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Oh my goodness, you've asked for quite a list.

    Let's see, a few near the top, in no particular order:

    "A Flower Does not Talk"  Tuttle, collection of Zen essays.

    "The Changing Face of Jesus"  Geza Vermes,

    The Gnostic Gospels (not sure of the exact title) by Elaine Pagels,

    "The Sickness Unto Death"  Soren Kierkegaard,

    "The Origins of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind"  Julian Jaynes,


    "A Peoples History of the United States"  Howard Zinn,

    "Soul on Ice" Eldrige Cleaver,

    "The Bible Unearthed" Finkelstein & Silberman,

    "The Screwtape Letters" C.S. Lewis,

    That's a good start, it's a journey.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as another person's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 14,868 ✭✭✭✭✭
    ""The Origins of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind"  Julian Jaynes" is a good one.

    "Maha Yoga" by Who -- the teachings of Sri Ramana Maharshi

    Encyclopedia Britannica



  • 0patience0patience Oregon CoastPosts: 10,399 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Another couple of books that changed my way of thinking were these 3 Jules Verne's books.

    Master of the World 
    Robur the Conqueror
    The Chase of the Golden Meteor

    I read them when I was young, but they opened my mind to a way of thinking that the impossible is possible. 

    If you are a person who enjoys invention, mechanics and sci-fi, then while these books are classics, they get the mind to working and seeing the genius that Verne had to be.

    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
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