World War II Fathers

Sleddog46Sleddog46 Quinton, N.J.Posts: 916 ✭✭✭✭✭
Recently been missing my Dad who died 54 years ago when I was 10. He was a WWII vet who saw some heavy **** in Europe. D-Day plus 2, Holland, France, Bastonge, etc. Almost had his feet amputated from frost bite. He was a Staff Sergeant in The 28th division nicknamed The Bloody Bucket Brigade by the ****'s. He ran the communication lines. His company held a bridge attacked by 3 divisions of Hitlers SS Elite. I miss the fact that I never got the chance to talk to him about his experience's there as I grew older and understood more. Hope some of you got to experience more with your Fathers than I did. And if any WWII vets are still around Thank them for the HELL they went thru. Maybe some would care to share Divisions, Companies, and ranks they held. Also Europe or the Pacific. Sorry if this sounds like a downer but I needed to talk and knew I could count on you to listen and understand. Thanks
You can't dispel Ignorance if you retain Arrogance!

Comments

  • thehilkthehilk Wilmington, MAPosts: 1,108 ✭✭✭
    Love everything about this post. I am thankful for your fathers service to this country 
  • Sleddog46Sleddog46 Quinton, N.J.Posts: 916 ✭✭✭✭✭
    thehilk said:
    Love everything about this post. I am thankful for your fathers service to this country 
    Thank You, This means a lot to me.
    You can't dispel Ignorance if you retain Arrogance!
  • dirtdudedirtdude LaughlinPosts: 4,965 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Appreciate your Pops service.  My grandfather was a WW2 draftee but as a 36 yr old father of 4 they stationed him stateside, driver for some upper echelon ****, guess all those years of driving Capone's hootch paid off.
    A little dirt never hurt
  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 7,104 ✭✭✭✭✭


    I recently found my birth-family. Pic above is my dad. Wish I had met him. 
    My adoptive father was in the Coast Guard before the war, during the war he was a machinist at General Electric.
  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 7,104 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edit:^ the first became an alcoholic and died while having a seizure, the second committed suicide when I was 12. War sucks not only for those killed but for the survivors.
  • GuitardedGuitarded AlbuquerquePosts: 3,415 ✭✭✭✭✭
    From the veterans memorial in Truth or Consequences NM. 

    Friends don't let good friends smoke cheap cigars.
  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,534 ✭✭✭✭✭
    My father was one of the first to land on D-Day. He was a beach master, not a long lived job. He walked to Berlin and on the way opened a couple of the death camps. He was up and down in rank. I guess you can't stick your rifle in Patton's face and expect to make general yourself. When the ceasefire was announced he was ordered to Paris to protect it. He hated it, you never knew which group of frogs were going to shoot at you. He would not talk about any of it, ever. Found out what little I know from his brothers, all of them enlisted. All 4 made it back.
    All the husbands that lived on our street after the war were pretty much all veterans from all branches of service. My god father, lived 2 doors down, was a Canadian who joined the RAF and flew the "devil plane". He crashed landed more than once and 2 times in the same field where his future wife was hanging clothes.
    We lived in a very safe neighborhood. 
    Bill Whittle "Look It Up"

    "I'm suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I usually trust a dog when it doesn't like a person.”

  • Sleddog46Sleddog46 Quinton, N.J.Posts: 916 ✭✭✭✭✭
    jd50ae said:
    My father was one of the first to land on D-Day. He was a beach master, not a long lived job. He walked to Berlin and on the way opened a couple of the death camps. He was up and down in rank. I guess you can't stick your rifle in Patton's face and expect to make general yourself. When the ceasefire was announced he was ordered to Paris to protect it. He hated it, you never knew which group of frogs were going to shoot at you. He would not talk about any of it, ever. Found out what little I know from his brothers, all of them enlisted. All 4 made it back.
    All the husbands that lived on our street after the war were pretty much all veterans from all branches of service. My god father, lived 2 doors down, was a Canadian who joined the RAF and flew the "devil plane". He crashed landed more than once and 2 times in the same field where his future wife was hanging clothes.
    We lived in a very safe neighborhood. 



     Same here about what he would say. Most of what I know is from the internet and a diary he carried.  And I bet you never had to lock your doors.
    You can't dispel Ignorance if you retain Arrogance!
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