Historical/Neat Items In Your Town

StubbleStubble T E X A SPosts: 3,959 ✭✭✭✭✭

Here is a "Public Watering Trough" built in 1913.  It sits outside our county courthouse, which was built in 1884 and remodeled in 1926.  It is the last one remaining, and has been refurbished over time.  Got any obscure, but possible interesting, things around the corner in your town?

Hey, you gonna eat the rest of that corndog?
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Comments

  • IndustMechIndustMech FIBPosts: 1,960 ✭✭✭✭✭
    We have the Joliet Prison.



    It was in the opening scene of The Blues Brothers 


    Let's eat, GrandMa.
    Let's eat GrandMa.

    Punctuation saves lives
  • IndustMechIndustMech FIBPosts: 1,960 ✭✭✭✭✭
    And in the series Prison Break

    Let's eat, GrandMa.
    Let's eat GrandMa.

    Punctuation saves lives
  • Sleddog46Sleddog46 Quinton, N.J.Posts: 930 ✭✭✭✭✭
    We have so much history around us that there's to much to tell. Houses and Churches built in the 1600's on., the first log Cabin built in the U'S. A bridge just down the end of my street that was a Revolutionary war battle. (The Quinton Bridge) that was attacked by the British.One church in town (Salem,NJ) has the oldest bell tower and clock in this country. Just a bounty of history.
    You can't dispel Ignorance if you retain Arrogance!
  • deadmandeadman Midland, NCPosts: 3,846 ✭✭✭✭✭
    We have Reed Gold Mine, it's a state site now and open to the public.
  • dirtdudedirtdude LaughlinPosts: 4,970 ✭✭✭✭✭
    deadman said:
    We have Reed Gold Mine, it's a state site now and open to the public.
    We can mine that
    A little dirt never hurt
  • deadmandeadman Midland, NCPosts: 3,846 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2017
    dirtdude said:
    deadman said:
    We have Reed Gold Mine, it's a state site now and open to the public.
    We can mine that
    More of a museum and tour of the mine. You can pan for $2 a bucket but the dirt they use actually comes from about 20 miles away. Some people do find flakes which you keep. A former owner of my property actually dug holes all over looking for gold.

     There was so much gold coming out of the area in the early 1800s that there was a mint in Charlotte.
  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,555 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Davy Crockett's house is just up the road. I shall venture forth in a few and get a few pictures.
    Bill Whittle "Look It Up"

    "I'm suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I usually trust a dog when it doesn't like a person.”

  • Captain_CallCaptain_Call Cambridge NebraskaPosts: 1,511 ✭✭✭✭✭
    We have a few signs around town showing the high water mark from the flood back in 1935. It's even with the top of my bedroom door. I live over 1000 yards from the current banks and over 30 feet higher. There's entire sections of our cemetery where everyone interred was lost to the flood
  • rsherman24rsherman24 Scranton, PAPosts: 3,914 ✭✭✭✭✭
    See if anyone recognizes this
  • cbuckcbuck Milford, CTPosts: 5,196 ✭✭✭✭✭
    See if anyone recognizes this
    The hill that leads into Scranton Pennsylvania! Where is the bananas?
  • MarkwellMarkwell Central PAPosts: 1,675 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2017
    Lazy Scranton, The Electric City. We call it that because of the elec-tri-CITY! (From the U.S. version of The Office o'course).

    Haven't been up there in a few months. Used to volunteer at Steamtown every summer. 
    “Happiness? A good cigar, a good meal, a good cigar and a good woman – or a bad woman; it depends on how much happiness you can handle.” – George Burns
  • YaksterYakster La Zona State of Mind when I haven't forgotten the coffee filtersPosts: 9,358 ✭✭✭✭✭
    There's the Almaden Quicksilver Mine which was once the most productive mercury mine in the United States.  That's why you don't eat any local fish you catch.
    I'll gladly bomb you Tuesday for an Opus today.

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  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 7,146 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Dennis Cranberrying plaqueDennis saltworks

    Salt Works

    Salt Works Rd. & Cold Storage Rd., East Dennis

    Salt was vital to the Cape's large fishing fleet and maritime trade. Most Cape salt was obtained by importation and boiling of seawater using prodigious amounts of scarce wood. With imports shut off by the Revolutionary War, John Sears, a Quivet Neck resident, began experimenting in 1776 with evaporative precipitiation of sea water, an effort which resulted in only 8 bushels of salt after weeks of effort. Inventing portable roofs to cover the salt vats, protecting them from rain, Capt. Sears obtained a patent in 1799.
    By 1832, 881 salt works produced some 250,000 bushels of salt annually. With the discovery of salt in mines in New York, and the advent of the railroad, the evaporative process was far too expensive, and the business declined. The last salt vats were dismantled in the 1890s.Dennis Shiverick Shipyard

    Shiverick Shipyard

    Sesuit Neck Road at the marina and boat ramp, Dennis

    Asa Shiverick launched his first vessel, a schooner, in 1815. This was followed by a square-rigged brig, many more schooners, and eventually eight handsome clipper ships that would grace harbors around the world. The Shivericks (Asa would be joined by three sons in 1837) moved the shipyard near the mouth of Sesuit Creek to enable the launch-ing of the much larger clipper ships, the only Cape shipyard to build such vessels. A Plaque honoring the Shivericks was dedicated in 1924.

  • EchambersEchambers B'Ham Posts: 4,176 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Gen. Pickett, of the infamous "Pickett's Charge" during the Battle of Gettysburg lived in my hometown before the war.  His house is still here, which is now a museum, and they named a bridge after him.
    -- "There's something that doesn't make sense. Let's go poke it with a stick."
  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 7,146 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Martel said:
    https://youtu.be/qbL4ue_LfOo?t=3m45s


    And I sleep in a log cabin dating to the 1820s.  How's that for historic?
    I'd love to see a picture of that^
  • MartelMartel Somewhere in PAPosts: 3,282 ✭✭✭✭
    Martel said:
    https://youtu.be/qbL4ue_LfOo?t=3m45s


    And I sleep in a log cabin dating to the 1820s.  How's that for historic?
    I'd love to see a picture of that^
    From the outside it doesn't look like much.  It got stuccoed over.  The cabin wasn't original to this property.  Three or four owners ago bought it from down in MD, disassembled it and brought it here. 

    They put it together and were ready to start using it when it rained.  He realized it wasn't as well-reconstructed as he thought once things got wet, so he called in the stucco crew.  I know this because he now lives across the street.  His wife used to use it as a craft shop; we made it our master bedroom.  I'll try to get a pic of the inside at some point, but it has some leftover wrapping whirlwind disaster area Christmas is coming kind of look to it right now.  My wife wouldn't appreciate that being consumed by the public.
    Intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

    I like Oliva and Quesada (including Regius) a lot.  I will smoke anything, though.
  • YankeeManYankeeMan Posts: 2,208 ✭✭✭✭
    When we lived in NY, there were two small towns near each other, Climax and Surprise.  Somehow, I thought that was fitting.
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 5,570 ✭✭✭✭✭
    deadman said:
    dirtdude said:
    deadman said:
    We have Reed Gold Mine, it's a state site now and open to the public.
    We can mine that
    More of a museum and tour of the mine. You can pan for $2 a bucket but the dirt they use actually comes from about 20 miles away. Some people do find flakes which you keep. A former owner of my property actually dug holes all over looking for gold.

     There was so much gold coming out of the area in the early 1800s that there was a mint in Charlotte.
    ... and to think that DeSoto and his boys marched right past all that and never knew it was there.
    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • jlmartajlmarta 50 miles from ParadisePosts: 7,113 ✭✭✭✭✭
    When I was in Oklahoma in 1979 on a construction project, there was a town named Nowata. Not far away was one named Lottawata. 

    And there was a spot in Oklahoma where signs at a crossroad pointed one way toward Porter and a different way toward Waggoner. I always figured that was where Porter Waggoner got the inspiration for his stage name. 

    Things are kinda different in Oklahoma. 
  • dirtdudedirtdude LaughlinPosts: 4,970 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I was expecting to see a picture of our resident oldfart @jlmarta in this thread.
    A little dirt never hurt
  • jlmartajlmarta 50 miles from ParadisePosts: 7,113 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2017
    Well, shoot. I already claimed my spot in this lineup back on Christmas Day. You expected a photo, too??   Sheesh!  :#
  • dirtdudedirtdude LaughlinPosts: 4,970 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Love ya Marty, those were great photos btw
    A little dirt never hurt
  • matkn293matkn293 O'Fallon, MOPosts: 3,602 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Old yes, historical???  

    Life is too short to smoke bad cigars!!!

    Oh when the Blues, Oh when the Blues, Oh when the Blues go marching in!

    F San Jose!!!!! Lets get it on!

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