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Just getting started

Hello all. I am new to the hobby of Cigars and was looking for some suggestions on what I should try. I just recently acquired a 30-50 count humidor. I will say that I have not ventured too far out into the various worlds of cigars. I have started myself out on Drew Estate Java Mint cigars and started branching out that way. I have read and heard that buying samplers is the best way to really narrow down my likes and dislikes. 

I am also looking for tips on what percentage humidity boveda packs everyone is using. I have heard many different ways to season a humidor and I have also read through the 102 tips for noobies thread. 

In all of your experiences, should I use the distilled water method of seasoning or just stick to a boveda pack seasoning kit?

What direction or brand or type of cigar should I branch out to from the Java Mint by Drew Estate? Did anyone start with a similar flavored cigar, if so where did you go from there?

Thanks in advance!

-Steve

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Comments

  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    Thank you for your tips. Is your use of 69% boveda packs more a personal choice or based on your climate? Why do you suggest avoiding Gurkha’s?
  • firehouseguyfirehouseguy KansasPosts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Gurka rubicon’s are pretty good
    Cigars were made to be smoked, whiskey was made to be drank and women were made to be loved. The only thing I try to age is myself. 
  • ForMudForMud Aka; Quickdraw, Clayton, DelawarePosts: 1,102 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thank you for your tips. Is your use of 69% boveda packs more a personal choice or based on your climate? Why do you suggest avoiding Gurkha’s?
    Their quality control isn't the best, leading to you having burn issues. Which gets frustrating because you think it's something you've done wrong. 
    Your on the right track when it comes to the sampler packs. Keep an eye on the daily deals on here too.
    I started with 72% packs, which kept my humidor at 70%.....Since then I've changed over to 65% and really notice and change for the better.
    One of the most important thing is..........Sit back, relax and enjoy the smoke. 
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 5,172 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited June 2018
    Regarding your question on ?% Boveda, I do think that where you live makes a difference.  You see @Usaf06 above, in Florida, using 69%.  I'm in Tennessee, same thing.  Both tend to be very humid.  Oppressively so at times.  

    I've noticed that folks living in places like Arizona or the eastern side of California etc. tend toward 65% or even 63%.  You don't want a rapid change of environment when you smoke your cigar.  It's a good idea to let it sit for 15 - 30 minutes in the place you'll be smoking before lighting.

    That said, I don't expect my humidor to be 69%.  I have wooden humidors and a 69% Boveda tends to keep them at about 65%, which works well for me since I smoke indoors with the central air.  

    As far as what should you smoke next?  Who knows?  Only you will know what you like.  Try stuff, and go back to the 102 tips from time to time as your experience grows.  Oh, and in a year or so, what you like today may not satisfy, your tastes will change from time to time.  For instance, I used to smoke a lot of Connecticut, now that's only occasionally.

    Most of all, have fun.  Enjoy.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as someone else's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • Diver43Diver43 South FloridaPosts: 1,483 ✭✭✭✭✭
    As already stated, singles and sample packs are a great way to sample a wide range of cigars and narrow down your likes and dislikes.
    Which percentage Boveda packs will depend on what you like and your area.  I live in South Florida where the humidity is very high year round which would lead you to believe that I would utilize the lower ones offered, except even though the outside humidity may be 92% on any given day, with the A/C running the indoor humidity is only 50-55% so i need to adjust accordingly.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • Bob_LukenBob_Luken already sucked before joining forum,.....just sayin'.Posts: 7,673 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Hello Steve. I've not ever tried Java Mint. Never had much experience with flavored cigars. If I was your cigar sensei, I'd make you eat those Java Mints until you puked. Then we could start from scratch with REAL cigars. Hahaha, just kidding. There's a world of cigars out there and how to find your best most favorite cigar is the most common question from newbies. It's logical to ask yourself, what will I like best?  But, I bet you'll be like all the rest who eventually learn that they like a lot of different types of cigars and it would be hard for them to even try to pick a favorite. 

    The Drew Estate non-flavored cigars are excellent. 
      

    Herrera Esteli

    All the Liga Privadas

    Norteño

    Undercrown

  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    Markwell said:
    Welcome aboard, Steven. Stick around and get that username changed. 

    Samplers are great because if you don't like that particular stick you're not stuck with a whole box. When I was starting out I watched a lot of youtube and used to just go into my b&m and pick out a bunch of singles to try. Like USAF said, start some form of notebook so you know what you have tried and liked.  Been keeping one for a few years now and they're handy for multiple reasons.

    Personally I recommend 65% boveda. I started out running at 69% but found a few points less was about where I liked my cigars. It's all about what you like and what your climate is like. 65 is good for me because I'm OCD and have been taught that anything over 70 is dangerous for mold and beetle egg hatching. So instead of running that risk if something fluctuates I just keep it a bit lower.

    As far as seasoning, there are a lot of good discussions on here which dive into the best methods. Use the search bar and you'll find them. Would not recommend wiping down your humidor no matter what some may say...it's risky. 

    I started on Legends by Drew Estate from CI and discovered Arturo Fuente shortly thereafter. It's not the only brand I smoke by far, but definitely my go to. My best answer is to try everything you see at least twice even if you don't think you'd like it.

    Word of advice if you do stick around: get yoself a cooler because these cats are crazy.
    Hello Markwell,

    I also have a similar mindset to yours about 70% and above can lead to issues. I travel from the Pocono's to New Jersey rather often and spend time in both regions. I was trying to narrow down a good percentage based on my area. 

    I will also look into those discussions as I have been already. I will be sure to check out Legends and also Arturo Fuente. 

    -Steve
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    ForMud said:
    Thank you for your tips. Is your use of 69% boveda packs more a personal choice or based on your climate? Why do you suggest avoiding Gurkha’s?
    Their quality control isn't the best, leading to you having burn issues. Which gets frustrating because you think it's something you've done wrong. 
    Your on the right track when it comes to the sampler packs. Keep an eye on the daily deals on here too.
    I started with 72% packs, which kept my humidor at 70%.....Since then I've changed over to 65% and really notice and change for the better.
    One of the most important thing is..........Sit back, relax and enjoy the smoke. 
    Thanks for the tips on Gurkha's and on what percentage packs you run. My local cigar shop also recommended 65%-68%.
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    Regarding your question on ?% Boveda, I do think that where you live makes a difference.  You see @Usaf06 above, in Florida, using 69%.  I'm in Tennessee, same thing.  Both tend to be very humid.  Oppressively so at times.  

    I've noticed that folks living in places like Arizona or the eastern side of California etc. tend toward 65% or even 63%.  You don't want a rapid change of environment when you smoke your cigar.  It's a good idea to let it sit for 15 - 30 minutes in the place you'll be smoking before lighting.

    That said, I don't expect my humidor to be 69%.  I have wooden humidors and a 69% Boveda tends to keep them at about 65%, which works well for me since I smoke indoors with the central air.  

    As far as what should you smoke next?  Who knows?  Only you will know what you like.  Try stuff, and go back to the 102 tips from time to time as your experience grows.  Oh, and in a year or so, what you like today may not satisfy, your tastes will change from time to time.  For instance, I used to smoke a lot of Connecticut, now that's only occasionally.

    Most of all, have fun.  Enjoy.
    Thank you for your tip about letting my cigars sit for 15-30 minutes before lighting. I just ordered a sampler with ten cigars. I will be sure to take note in which I enjoy and go from there.
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    Bob_Luken said:
    Hello Steve. I've not ever tried Java Mint. Never had much experience with flavored cigars. If I was your cigar sensei, I'd make you eat those Java Mints until you puked. Then we could start from scratch with REAL cigars. Hahaha, just kidding. There's a world of cigars out there and how to find your best most favorite cigar is the most common question from newbies. It's logical to ask yourself, what will I like best?  But, I bet you'll be like all the rest who eventually learn that they like a lot of different types of cigars and it would be hard for them to even try to pick a favorite. 

    The Drew Estate non-flavored cigars are excellent. 
      

    Herrera Esteli

    All the Liga Privadas

    Norteño

    Undercrown

    Hello Bob,

    Lol. I figured I would try something a little mild before I dove into the heavy sticks. The few that were next on my list were a few different Drew Estates. I hear great things about the Liga Privada No. 9. 

    I just ordered a sampler from CI and will see what I end up enjoying. 

    Thank you for your suggestions!

    -Steve
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    Thank you to everyone who has commented so far. I also wanted to ask: in your opinion do Cuban Cigars live up to the hype? Is it worth spending the extra money for a Cohiba or another Cuban cigar brand?
  • GaryThompsonGaryThompson South CarolinaPosts: 788 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited June 2018
    You're gonna catch some grief around here with the flavored cigars... it's like trying compare fine wines to wine coolers with a sommelier. There are some true BoL connoisseurs  around here that can help you develop your palate and truly discover a new world. They'll probably steer you clear of nuking your taste buds and palate with the flavored stuff to help you find where the subtleties and true magic are in whatever you're smoking.  It's pretty much going to come down to either you like it or you don't at this point. Try everything (except flavored for now) and have fun.  Welcome to the circus.
    *Edit- Try the harder stuff on a full stomach.  If you break into the cold sweats,  go for a little walk.. helped me in the beginning. 
  • TX98Z28TX98Z28 TexasPosts: 1,690 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thank you to everyone who has commented so far. I also wanted to ask: in your opinion do Cuban Cigars live up to the hype? Is it worth spending the extra money for a Cohiba or another Cuban cigar brand?
    Cuba can produce some excellent cigars, problem is making sure you don't get scammed with fakes...ESPECIALLY Cohiba! Me personally Partagas Serie P No.2, Serie D No.4, Cuaba Salomones, are some of my favorites for the money. You can smoke a bad cigar from Cuba just as easily as smoking a bad cigar from anywhere else IMO.  
    If you quote me do the @TX98Z28 in your text or I won't be notified of your quote, Thanks.
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 5,172 ✭✭✭✭✭
    .  If you break into the cold sweats,  go for a little walk.. helped me in the beginning. 
    Good advice, also, carbs.  A spoonful of sugar...as Mary Poppins said. ;)
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as someone else's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 5,172 ✭✭✭✭✭

     I just ordered a sampler with ten cigars. I will be sure to take note in which I enjoy and go from there.
    I like this guy.  Either he's really done his homework, or possibly had guidance.  @MichaelScott , are you one of the guys that Ron recommended to come here?

    Doesn't matter, I hope you have fun with the new hobby.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as someone else's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • MarkwellMarkwell Central PAPosts: 1,685 ✭✭✭✭✭
    If you're the real Michael Scott I want an autograph or something lol. The Office is my favorite show.
    “Happiness? A good cigar, a good meal, a good cigar and a good woman – or a bad woman; it depends on how much happiness you can handle.” – George Burns
  • 0patience0patience Oregon CoastPosts: 9,240 ✭✭✭✭✭

    In all of your experiences, should I use the distilled water method of seasoning or just stick to a boveda pack seasoning kit?

    Distilled or Bovedas, personally, I'm not a fan of standing water, as mildew and mold really love the edges of water, especially if it's in foam.
    So Bovedas or beads to me, are a better way to go.

    What direction or brand or type of cigar should I branch out to from the Java Mint by Drew Estate? 

    Anywhere.
    Your tastes may be there now, but over time, you may discover certain wrappers or types of cigars are to your liking.
    Problem is, only you can decide that. 
    But Rosados, sungrown and cameroon all seem to be cigars that are generally smoother. Try one, see how you like it, then if you do, move to another.
    And believe me when I say that you will go through quite a few that just don't do it for you. It may be that you don't dislike them, but they just don't hit the spot.

    MichaelScott said:
    Did anyone start with a similar flavored cigar, if so where did you go from there?
    No. Not even close to that thing. 
    Infused are one of those you have to be able to stomach and with exceptions of the Moontrance, there are very few infused I can tolerate.
    Well, Baccarats would be one that could be considered close, but that was many moons ago. LOL!
    There is no crisis that a good cigar can't cure.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
  • Thanatos0320Thanatos0320 Posts: 578 ✭✭✭
    I started out on the Drew Estate Dirt Torpedo and then the tabak especial and then i moved on to cameroons because I felt they left a slightly sweet taste in my mouth. Eventually, I stopped smoking the infused cigars and was hooked on cameroons and later habanos. If you want another sweet cigar then maybe you could try the nub cafe cappuccino.
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    You're gonna catch some grief around here with the flavored cigars... it's like trying compare fine wines to wine coolers with a sommelier. There are some true BoL connoisseurs  around here that can help you develop your palate and truly discover a new world. They'll probably steer you clear of nuking your taste buds and palate with the flavored stuff to help you find where the subtleties and true magic are in whatever you're smoking.  It's pretty much going to come down to either you like it or you don't at this point. Try everything (except flavored for now) and have fun.  Welcome to the circus.
    *Edit- Try the harder stuff on a full stomach.  If you break into the cold sweats,  go for a little walk.. helped me in the beginning. 
    Thank you for the advice Gary. I will avoid flavored from now on. It is also really good to know about trying the harder stuff on a full stomach and about taking a walk.
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    TX98Z28 said:
    Thank you to everyone who has commented so far. I also wanted to ask: in your opinion do Cuban Cigars live up to the hype? Is it worth spending the extra money for a Cohiba or another Cuban cigar brand?
    Cuba can produce some excellent cigars, problem is making sure you don't get scammed with fakes...ESPECIALLY Cohiba! Me personally Partagas Serie P No.2, Serie D No.4, Cuaba Salomones, are some of my favorites for the money. You can smoke a bad cigar from Cuba just as easily as smoking a bad cigar from anywhere else IMO.  
    I have seen a lot online about the fake Cohiba's. I have watched a few youtube videos on spotting the differences as well.
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13

     I just ordered a sampler with ten cigars. I will be sure to take note in which I enjoy and go from there.
    I like this guy.  Either he's really done his homework, or possibly had guidance.  @MichaelScott , are you one of the guys that Ron recommended to come here?

    Doesn't matter, I hope you have fun with the new hobby.
    I am actually not one of the guys that Ron recommended to come here. It just popped into my head yesterday when I was trying to think of something since it is always on in my apartment. I started the show from day 1 that it aired on TV until the very end. It is literally my life.

    Michael Scott quote (since I just watched this episode): 

    "Nobody likes beets, Dwight! Why don't you grow something that everybody does like? You should grow candy."

     
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    Markwell said:
    If you're the real Michael Scott I want an autograph or something lol. The Office is my favorite show.
    The Office is also my favorite show. I was on every episode from Season 1-7 and obviously Season 9 Episode 23. 

    Since I just watched this episode for the 1000th time, here is a Michael Scott quote for you: 

    "Nobody likes beets, Dwight! Why don't you grow something that everybody does like? You should grow candy."

  • Bob_LukenBob_Luken already sucked before joining forum,.....just sayin'.Posts: 7,673 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @MichaelScott

    Carbs (pastas, breads etc) ahead of time if you're concerned about handling the nicotine. A sweet treat afterward (sugars) will help you if you actually do get too much nicotine. 
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    I started out on the Drew Estate Dirt Torpedo and then the tabak especial and then i moved on to cameroons because I felt they left a slightly sweet taste in my mouth. Eventually, I stopped smoking the infused cigars and was hooked on cameroons and later habanos. If you want another sweet cigar then maybe you could try the nub cafe cappuccino.
    I will have to put the nub cafe cappuccino on my list. It sounds pretty good.
  • MichaelScottMichaelScott Posts: 13
    @Bob_Luken I do not believe that I will have an issue with the nicotine, but it is good to know ways to prep for it and how to deal with it after the fact. Thank you Bob. I had no idea.
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