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Cigars Need a Nap, You Say?

peter4jcpeter4jc Milwaukee, WIPosts: 9,618 ✭✭✭✭✭
We've all heard someone say it, in fact, I just said it today, "It's still new, and it'll be better with some rest."

But how do you know when a cigar will actually improve with some age, or if it's tasting crappy when new because it's actually a crappy cigar?

What is it about the flavor that tells you it'll be good? Or, do we just assume that it'll get better after a while?  Is it just wishful thinking, because we paid $12 for a trusted boutique brand and don't like it, that a year will magically transform it into a better cigar?

Talk amongst yourselves.
"I could've had a Mi Querida!"   Nick Bardis

Comments

  • YaksterYakster I'm on a Buying Freeze / I sent the Coffee Filters!Posts: 14,889 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb...

    Peas and carrots, peas and carrots...

    I've heard stronger cigars usually benefit from rest.  Any cigar with ammonia notes from fermentation should get more rest.  Milder cigars may fade with rest.  I think rest knocks off the sharp edges, allows the flavors to blend, and in the case of cigars in the sick period of fermentation gets rid of ammonia notes.
    I'll gladly bomb you Tuesday for an Opus today.

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  • ForMudForMud Aka; Quickdraw, Clayton, DelawarePosts: 1,799 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I've often wondered how would I remember what it tasted like a year ago to know if it improved or not...Even with taking notes, your taste might have changed.  
  • PatrickbrickPatrickbrick Lake Zurich IlPosts: 6,058 ✭✭✭✭✭
    That answer is simple, ask Nick.  He "Smokes cigars and knows things".  Seriously though just intuition, if you know what you like, one can guess how it will change.  
    "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give".  Winston Churchill.
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  • First_WarriorFirst_Warrior N.C. MountainsPosts: 2,221 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I do know from rolling my own cigars that a month of resting makes quite a bit of difference. I think resting mellows the ligero a bit and like Yakster said takes the sharpness out. Aged tobacco seems to have more flavor.
    The Native Peoples of the Americas gave tobacco to the world.
  • MarkwellMarkwell Central PAPosts: 1,685 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think a lot of what you can expect from rest would be as stated above: a more rounded and more flavorful cigar. I'll also add that age will give you a more complex profile. 
    “Happiness? A good cigar, a good meal, a good cigar and a good woman – or a bad woman; it depends on how much happiness you can handle.” – George Burns
  • Bob_LukenBob_Luken already sucked before joining forum,.....just sayin'.Posts: 8,149 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I look at it as a happy accident. I don't age cigars, I just forget about them. As I write this I'm enjoying a 601 blue maduro with four years on it. I got a box at auction because it seemed a good enough price at the time and also because I had enjoyed at least one previously. Well, I wasn't that crazy about them after they came in.  So I tried one every so often. The verdict? This cigar has never been as good as it is now. It's not fantastic at this point, but it sure seems a lot better now than before. Do mediocre cigars become excellent cigars with age? No. Do excellent cigars become magically delicious with age. No. But if you were to pair it with Dragons Milk who knows what you'd say about it. That stuff is a hot sexy side-chick to any cigar. No. I am not pairing my 601 with Dragons Milk,......maybe next time though.
  • peter4jcpeter4jc Milwaukee, WIPosts: 9,618 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I understand cigars improving with age, and have experienced it over and over.

    The question is how do you know if it will improve?  How do you know if it's just a crappy cigar that will stay crappy, or if it's crappy because it's new and will improve. 

    Yakster gave some insight referring to the ammonia flavor and the sick period if it's too new.  But let's say that period is over.  Can we still accurately say whether or not it will stay crappy or improve, and how do you know?
    "I could've had a Mi Querida!"   Nick Bardis
  • peter4jcpeter4jc Milwaukee, WIPosts: 9,618 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Me too.
    "I could've had a Mi Querida!"   Nick Bardis
  • ForMudForMud Aka; Quickdraw, Clayton, DelawarePosts: 1,799 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I guess the only way to know for sure would be smoke a fresh one then follow with a little age on it, then one with a lot of age to it.
    I could see doing something like that with a stick you really like and smoke often to find out the best aging time. But that's a lot of work to do just to find out it's still a crappy stick.
  • dirtdudedirtdude Green ValleyPosts: 5,133 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I don't think a ****/crappy ( guess I can't say that) stick will improve with age but there are some inexpensive sticks that way outdo themselves with a little age.
    A little dirt never hurt
  • peter4jcpeter4jc Milwaukee, WIPosts: 9,618 ✭✭✭✭✭
    So another way to phrase this is, let's say you have a stick and are wondering if it would merit a 5'er or a box. But you can tell it's not ready yet. Can you predict what it'll be like down the road? 
    "I could've had a Mi Querida!"   Nick Bardis
  • NorCalR1NorCalR1 San Jose CaPosts: 3,435 ✭✭✭✭✭
    peter4jc said:
    So another way to phrase this is, let's say you have a stick and are wondering if it would merit a 5'er or a box. But you can tell it's not ready yet. Can you predict what it'll be like down the road? 
    I usually buy them in 2’s smoke one right away and smoke the other 3 months later. Not much of a wait but I figure if I don’t like it after trying it twice then it’s a pass for me. I also look for reviews from others

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  • First_WarriorFirst_Warrior N.C. MountainsPosts: 2,221 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I date all my cigars when i receive them. 
    The Native Peoples of the Americas gave tobacco to the world.
  • Bob_LukenBob_Luken already sucked before joining forum,.....just sayin'.Posts: 8,149 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I date all my cigars when i receive them. 
    I highly recommend this because when you finally get around to smoking it or giving it, you'll know exactly how long it's been instead of guessing. Two years can seem like four but why guess when you can know? I used to put stickers on all of them and then I stopped doing it as much and now I wish I hadn't slacked off.  
  • Gray4linesGray4lines KentuckyPosts: 4,686 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited June 2018
    I guess the cigars I know will be good with age I actually smoked an aged one first.  The first CAO Brazilia I smoked was from the very bottom of a box at a B&M and you could tell it had some years on it. Fantastic. Going back to "fresh" Brazilia's you can really tell how they smooth out over time. Padrons too. There can be some weird flavors or bitterness that come out.

    I guess for me, I have to like the cigar "fresh" and most all improve a lot with some age.  To me, a good candidate for aging is something with a really solid profile that I enjoy, but possibly with some harsh edges. Padrons, the CAO, some pepin blends stand out to me as fitting that.

    LLA - Lancero Lovers of America
  • RhamlinRhamlin WVPosts: 7,927 ✭✭✭✭✭
    A dog **** will still taste like a dog **** a year from now. Only milder. 
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