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what's the deal with altitude

webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 7,813 ✭✭✭✭✭
On the right coast, we have these Appalachians which they traditionally call mountains, but which are actually goosebumps. The highest elevation on I-80 east of the Father of Waters is marked by a sign at 2250 feet. Highest point in out tiny state of Dull-Aware is a speed bump in the Acme parking lot. In Winter, you get a little snow on that, and people complain of nosebleed.

Altitude here in Rigby Idaho is 4845 feet. Soda pop is fizzier here. Regular gas is three less octane. Bearswatter pants. Sky is closer, dust is drier, mountains loom. I smoked my first cigar at altitude last night, and it seemed to me that it burnt differently too.

I smoked one of FireTruckGuy's HC Habanos. Don't get me wrong, the burn was great -- slow, steady even. I was out on the bank of the South Fork Snake. At one point, I stuck the thing cherry upward in the xikar ash can, walked across the big yard, up the staiirs, thru the lodge, found my jacket, got tagged for a honey-do, did that ... by the time I returned it must have set there in the can for eight or ten minutes ... gave it the one, two, three puffs and it was as though I had just set it down.

But there was something about the volume, something about the thickness of the smoke. I dunno what it was. Maybe the dry air tossed in a quirk as well. Can't put my finger on it. This is why I am writing here. What's the deal with thin air?
image

“It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


Comments

  • jadeltjadelt Posts: 766
    You pretty much described my 4,000 foot altitude except gas is cheaper here. My smokes are nicer but it's cuz I have some great scenery to watch. I can leave my stick, go to the garage and loafing shed (300 yards away) come back and 3 puffs and its like I never left. Never thought about the altitude but 4,000 feet isnt that high.
  • NectarCigarNectarCigar Posts: 171
    Never really thought about it, that is interesting. Seems like most cigars I smoke lately go out if i don't give them my undivided attention!!
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 7,813 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yesterday, I took a plastic chair, an Angry Orchard hard cider, some pretzels, and an AL fresh rolled habano out to the riverbank. This was my control group, because I think I know that the AJ ought to taste like.

    It was thinner. The smoke was thinner, the flavor thinner... I think the thinner air just makes a weaker experience. I think if I lived up here I'd go for a fuller bodied smoke.

    One of the HC Connies which firetruckguy sent ahead of me to the B&B had a torn cello. Even inside its c.com plastic bag with a water pillow, that stick split up the side. I tried burning it yesterday. Weak. I'm going to save those for when I return to the lowlands. I'll bet they are a completely different experience. I'm going to burn one of his HC Maduros here, then compare with the same down the hill. My postulate is that thick damp sea level air makes a thicker creamier smoke.

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • deejmemixxdeejmemixx Posts: 3,084 ✭✭
    webmost:
    Yesterday, I took a plastic chair, an Angry Orchard hard cider, some pretzels, and an AL fresh rolled habano out to the riverbank. This was my control group, because I think I know that the AJ ought to taste like.

    It was thinner. The smoke was thinner, the flavor thinner... I think the thinner air just makes a weaker experience. I think if I lived up here I'd go for a fuller bodied smoke.

    One of the HC Connies which firetruckguy sent ahead of me to the B&B had a torn cello. Even inside its c.com plastic bag with a water pillow, that stick split up the side. I tried burning it yesterday. Weak. I'm going to save those for when I return to the lowlands. I'll bet they are a completely different experience. I'm going to burn one of his HC Maduros here, then compare with the same down the hill. My postulate is that thick damp sea level air makes a thicker creamier smoke.

    my sticks have been different since I moved to the low country.
  • beatnicbeatnic Posts: 4,133
    Less oxygen and lower atmospheric pressure.
  • fla-gypsyfla-gypsy Posts: 3,024 ✭✭
    I will stick to sea level and an ocean view with J Buffet playing softly in the background
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 7,411 ✭✭✭✭✭
    beatnic:
    Less oxygen and lower atmospheric pressure.
    Sounds like the answer to me.
    Reminds me of when I've ridden to Sturgis and then up into the Rockies on my old Super-Glide. About half-way through Nebraska the motor would start bugging me, I'd stop and adjust the S&S carbuerator, that was fine until Wyoming or Montana, then adjust again. Loved that carb, took about 30 seconds to adjust, once you got used to it. Same thing on the trip home, adjust in Nebraska, then again in Missouri.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as another person's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 7,813 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Amos Umwhat:
    beatnic:
    Less oxygen and lower atmospheric pressure.
    Sounds like the answer to me.
    Reminds me of when I've ridden to Sturgis and then up into the Rockies on my old Super-Glide. About half-way through Nebraska the motor would start bugging me, I'd stop and adjust the S&S carbuerator, that was fine until Wyoming or Montana, then adjust again. Loved that carb, took about 30 seconds to adjust, once you got used to it. Same thing on the trip home, adjust in Nebraska, then again in Missouri.
    Spotted this Honda CT110 parked near Old Faithful yesterday:

    image
    You can see the owner added a plastic gas tank in front of the seat. The Original tank is a gallon and a half under the seat. That where the tank is would have been empty like a girl's bike.

    Umpty ump years ago, I owned a CT90. Had a red air jet knob on the carb. When you hit six or seven thou, you pulled this knob, an extra air jet kicked in, and you were good to go for altitude. Easy as that.

    Best designed bike ever.

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • Gray4linesGray4lines KentuckyPosts: 4,691 ✭✭✭✭✭
    webmost:
    Amos Umwhat:
    beatnic:
    Less oxygen and lower atmospheric pressure.
    Sounds like the answer to me.
    Reminds me of when I've ridden to Sturgis and then up into the Rockies on my old Super-Glide. About half-way through Nebraska the motor would start bugging me, I'd stop and adjust the S&S carbuerator, that was fine until Wyoming or Montana, then adjust again. Loved that carb, took about 30 seconds to adjust, once you got used to it. Same thing on the trip home, adjust in Nebraska, then again in Missouri.
    Spotted this Honda CT110 parked near Old Faithful yesterday:

    image
    You can see the owner added a plastic gas tank in front of the seat. The Original tank is a gallon and a half under the seat. That where the tank is would have been empty like a girl's bike.

    Umpty ump years ago, I owned a CT90. Had a red air jet knob on the carb. When you hit six or seven thou, you pulled this knob, an extra air jet kicked in, and you were good to go for altitude. Easy as that.

    Best designed bike ever.

    Soooo damn cool
    LLA - Lancero Lovers of America
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 7,813 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Last stick I burnt in Idaho was one of FireTruckGuy's HC Maduros. First stick I burnt after returning to Dull-Aware was the same. Absolutely way thicker smoke, hence more flavor, at sea level. Plus, every single stick I burnt at altitude peeled some skin. If I lived at a higher altitude, I should surely smoke some stronger sotweed.

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • pelirrojopelirrojo Farmington, NMPosts: 1,759 ✭✭✭
    I live at about 5400 ft but honestly have never had a cigar at a lower elevation. I have recently smoked at about 7000 and about a month ago at 10000 but haven't noticed much of a difference. I also had a short story at about 11300 and didn't notice a difference other than the enormous buzz that I caught.
  • scarlinscarlin Posts: 1,592
    beatnic:
    Less oxygen and lower atmospheric pressure.
    +1 If you were atop Everest you would not be able to smoke a cigar at all.
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 7,813 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I'll put it on the bucket list.
    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


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