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CAM Programming!

Without getting to much in depth. I haven't been around as much in the past few months, life has been full of twists and turns for my family and me in recent months. Most of them not so great ones, but one negative turned into a positive when I was "discharged" from my previous cooking job. I ended up being unemployed for a few months... I was able to keep myself busy, and get lots of things done, but still felt like a lazy slob for some reason. Either way I have been given a great opportunity recently from a family friend to work for him learning CAM programming on some nice 5 axis vertical mills. I am definitely a mechanically inclined person, but not the greatest math mind. I have no schooling or real machining experience in the field, but my father did own a hobby shop with all the essential wood, and metal working tools. (vert mill, 2 lathes, pipe bender, etc.). I was wondering if we have any other forum member in the same field? I was also looking for some insight into the field, and how quick you would expect someone with very limited knowledge on it to pick it up! I am usually very good at picking things up and running with them, but I find myself baffled and sometimes a bit overwhelmed by this stuff. Not that I think I lack the ability to do the job, just frustration in not being able to ace it out the gates! Any suggestions or insight would mean a great deal to me!

Thanks in advance,
David

Comments

  • macs-smokesmacs-smokes Posts: 587
    I have done some CNC operation... a wee bit of programming... but I am truly a conventional machinist. I would say that you should continually improve and ask questions of the operators. Don't make the same simple mistake repeatedly. Within a year you should be very competent and at ease.
  • YankeeManYankeeMan Posts: 2,374 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Look at your local community college. With the bad economic times, a lot of cc's are running certificate programs in all phases of manufacturing. I teach at a community college and our school has a ton of programs geared at getting people the skills they need quickly, without having to go through an entire degree program.

    Good luck!

  • macs-smokesmacs-smokes Posts: 587
    Good advice... I never thought about that. The only other thing I can think of would be to spend some time working with the machinist on the floor. They can bridge gaps in education and application faster (and cheaper) than trial and error.
  • insomnniapbinsomnniapb Posts: 590
    macs-smokes:
    Good advice... I never thought about that. The only other thing I can think of would be to spend some time working with the machinist on the floor. They can bridge gaps in education and application faster (and cheaper) than trial and error.
    I spent the past week out on the floor shadowing, and learning the operator side on just the mills, which is what I will be programming for. I learned a-lot in a week, but there is soooo much more to learn. These guys have been doing this for 20+ years, and I'm glad to have them as a resource! I'll be back on the computer working on more programming aspects again next week. I'm looking forward to it! Things are seeming to start to click for the moment so hopefully this goes as smooth as possible.
  • insomnniapbinsomnniapb Posts: 590
    YankeeMan:
    Look at your local community college. With the bad economic times, a lot of cc's are running certificate programs in all phases of manufacturing. I teach at a community college and our school has a ton of programs geared at getting people the skills they need quickly, without having to go through an entire degree program.

    Good luck!

    Thanks, I have considered this! I do want to go back to school to pursue a something. I have quiet a few "qualifications" at the moment though, and if I did end up going back to class would be aiming for at least a 4 year degree. I wouldn't mind taking a few things here and there a bit later, but for now I am trying to cram this into my brain for free... Actually while I'm getting paid to work! Hehe you can't beat on the job training. If I end up picking up the CAM side through work I would consider attempting to pick up the CAD side, or going to get an engineering degree of some sort as well. Basicly what it comes down to is I would love to go to school, but at the moment I need to pick this up within a few weeks. I don't have time to go to school, or the job won't be there when I'm done.
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