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Dry Boxing.....

jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,934 ✭✭✭✭✭
....what does that mean..? I mean I understand the obvious but does it mean never to put them in a seasoned humidor..?

Comments

  • SleevePlzSleevePlz Goodrich, MIPosts: 6,249 ✭✭✭✭
    Dry boxing simply refers to taking a cigar out of the humidor for some time before smoking it (putting it in a dry box). Some cigars smoke much better after dry boxing.
    LLA - Lancero Lovers of America
  • EchambersEchambers B'Ham Posts: 4,178 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Does anyone on the forum do this regularly? Thoughts?
    -- "There's something that doesn't make sense. Let's go poke it with a stick."
  • MorganGeoMorganGeo Brandon, MSPosts: 2,241 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Echambers:
    Does anyone on the forum do this regularly? Thoughts?
    my thoughts are if you are properly storing your sticks in a humidor this isn't necessary.
  • allsmokedupallsmokedup Posts: 752 ✭✭
    It has nothing to do with storage, and more to do with certain cigars that smoke better at lower RH levels.
  • MartelMartel Somewhere in PAPosts: 3,304 ✭✭✭✭
    allsmokedup:
    It has nothing to do with storage, and more to do with certain cigars that smoke better at lower RH levels.
    Agree with this to a certain extent and would also add that dry boxing can help acclimate cigars to ambient conditions so they don't perform poorly. At least that's what it seems like to me. Even an hour out of the humidor seems to prevent burn problems in really hot or really cold conditions around here. I will say it could be considered a storage issue except most of us keep cigars in one environment. I'm convinced some cigars respond better to higher-end humidity and some to lower. Instead of having different humis, I keep them higher and dry box. Much easier.
    Intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

    I like Oliva and Quesada (including Regius) a lot.  I will smoke anything, though.
  • kuzi16kuzi16 Posts: 14,633 ✭✭✭✭
    SleevePlz:
    Dry boxing simply refers to taking a cigar out of the humidor for some time before smoking it (putting it in a dry box). Some cigars smoke much better after dry boxing.
    ... in your opinion.

    i dont dry box. i have also never had a cigar that i thought was better once it had been.

  • 0patience0patience Oregon CoastPosts: 10,401 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I keep one humidor for "dry boxing".
    But understand that I live in an area where it is real common for the humidity to be 80%+.
    That being said, it's rarely used.
    More often than not, the only time it sees use is when I get an order from some place and it's evident they've been shipped moist and I really want to try one.

    Then I may dry box it for a bit to bring the humidity down on the cigar.

    Most often, if you are storing your cigars in the 65-68% range, you may not ever see a need for it.

    It's one of those preference things. Some folks use them regularly and some folks never see a need for it.

    That being said, because of the high humidity area I live in, I will often set out a cigar where I plan on smoking it for a bit (30 minutes or so) to acclimate it. Especially cameroons or thin wrapper cigars, to help prevent the wrapper from cracking when I smoke it.

    Just my opinion, take it for what it's worth.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
  • MartelMartel Somewhere in PAPosts: 3,304 ✭✭✭✭
    0patience:
    I keep one humidor for "dry boxing".
    But understand that I live in an area where it is real common for the humidity to be 80%+.
    That being said, it's rarely used.
    More often than not, the only time it sees use is when I get an order from some place and it's evident they've been shipped moist and I really want to try one.

    Then I may dry box it for a bit to bring the humidity down on the cigar.

    Most often, if you are storing your cigars in the 65-68% range, you may not ever see a need for it.

    It's one of those preference things. Some folks use them regularly and some folks never see a need for it.

    That being said, because of the high humidity area I live in, I will often set out a cigar where I plan on smoking it for a bit (30 minutes or so) to acclimate it. Especially cameroons or thin wrapper cigars, to help prevent the wrapper from cracking when I smoke it.

    Just my opinion, take it for what it's worth.
    This. I rarely use it. But sometimes in the 90% humidity of the mid-South I deem it necessary.
    Intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

    I like Oliva and Quesada (including Regius) a lot.  I will smoke anything, though.
  • CigaryCigary Posts: 630
    There will be a few ideas as to what the term means but in it's basic form it is a term that means you take a "young" or "wet" cigar and then put it into an environment that is meant to bring that cigar into a dryer place...but one has to understand that it will take more than a day to really live up to that term. A cigar isn't going to 'dry out' in a day or so and give you RH all the way through...I stopped dryboxing a few years ago because for me it just isn't going to give you a RH from end to end...which is why we try and pick a RH that we like...63% or 65% and so on. Dry boxing is just a temporary fix that doesn't really 'fix' the issue as much as it makes one think that it does. I've 'dryboxes' too many cigars to know. JMHO
  • 0patience0patience Oregon CoastPosts: 10,401 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Cigary:
    Dry boxing is just a temporary fix that doesn't really 'fix' the issue as much as it makes one think that it does. I've 'dryboxes' too many cigars to know. JMHO
    You lost me on that one.
    A temporary fix on a cigar you will smoke and it will be gone? Sounds like a permanent fix to me. ROFL!
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
  • CigaryCigary Posts: 630
    Temporary......not a realistic 'fix' that turns the cigar into something smokeable...like using one of those 'donut' tires in your trunk. It gets you there but not in a way that is really what you expect out of a spare tire which should be the same size. Dryboxing tends to be the 'spare tire fix' .
  • 0patience0patience Oregon CoastPosts: 10,401 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Cigary:
    Temporary......not a realistic 'fix' that turns the cigar into something smokeable...like using one of those 'donut' tires in your trunk. It gets you there but not in a way that is really what you expect out of a spare tire which should be the same size. Dryboxing tends to be the 'spare tire fix' .
    Guessing I'm not that much of a purist.
    Most the cigars that I would dry box are what I would consider daily smokes.
    These would be something that just came in from the truck or something like that, that I wanted to smoke right away. It's a lack of patience thing.

    But, right or wrong it's a matter of preference and opinion.

    And there is a difference between dry boxing and acclimating.
    In Fumo Pax
    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cigars and that's close enough.

    Wylaff said:
    Atmospheric pressure and crap.
  • CigaryCigary Posts: 630
    Absolutely.....puros that some will pay $10 and above I think would probably want to ensure that they keep their cigars in the best condition they can while those from $5 and down are for just smoking...I have a lot of the $5 and under that smoke really well....even as good as the ultra premiums. As you said ....as far as what we like there is no right or wrong as it's really all about what we like. I just happen to like cigars that tend to cost more at times...a curse of the palate.
  • fla-gypsyfla-gypsy Posts: 3,024 ✭✭
    For those living in high humidity environs certain tobaccos just will not burn properly without dry boxing for a short time. It is a very temporary measure to enhance the burn characteristics and has nothing to do with proper or improper storage
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 7,354 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I've found dry-boxing to be useful at times, here in We(s)t Tennessee. Mostly for young cigars with oily wrappers. For instance, fairly fresh 5-Vegas Relic, 24 hours in dry-box helped immensely. A year or two later, not needed. When the Gran Habano Vintage Churchills came out, they needed a week or two, which may sound like blasphemey, but, whatever works. It worked. Right now, I think that if I were to buy some Bueso's, I'd give dry-boxing a try with them.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as another person's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • denniskingdennisking Posts: 3,703 ✭✭✭
    If you are smoking a 5 Vegas Relic or an Indian Tabac Super Fuerte, then drybox it first. This will help the burn characteristics considerably.
  • MartelMartel Somewhere in PAPosts: 3,304 ✭✭✭✭
    Amos Umwhat:
    I've found dry-boxing to be useful at times, here in We(s)t Tennessee. Mostly for young cigars with oily wrappers. For instance, fairly fresh 5-Vegas Relic, 24 hours in dry-box helped immensely. A year or two later, not needed. When the Gran Habano Vintage Churchills came out, they needed a week or two, which may sound like blasphemey, but, whatever works. It worked. Right now, I think that if I were to buy some Bueso's, I'd give dry-boxing a try with them.
    We(s)t Tennessee is classic. It was close to 90% humidity here the other day...when it was 34 out. I know the air can't hold much moisture when it's that cold, but it holds what it can around here.
    Intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

    I like Oliva and Quesada (including Regius) a lot.  I will smoke anything, though.
  • You can also use the microwave to dry box your sticks but it requires careful preparation, timing, and practice.
  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 7,354 ✭✭✭✭✭
    james40:
    You can also use the microwave to dry box your sticks but it requires careful preparation, timing, and practice.
    Um, really? That sounds dangerous.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  

    "There is nothing so in need of reforming as another person's bad habits."   Mark Twain
  • CigaryCigary Posts: 630
    I remember a fella that posted in a forum about how he did this with his cigars and it exploded into a circus posting of what other members did with their cigars to drybox them. Microwaving cigars isn't something that really works because no two microwaves are alike so in order to get that perfect setting you'd have to have experimented quite a bit and ruined a lot of cigars while doing it. Not sure what the objective would be in this since it would ruin more than it would help but....to each his own I guess.
  • PAtoNHPAtoNH Posts: 430
    I found I was inadvertently dry boxing this week after 2 weeks of dry, dry, cold weather and snow… eek!
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