EBOLA HITS AMERICA CDC identifies first case on US soil

jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,754 ✭✭✭✭✭
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed on Tuesday that a patient being treated at a Dallas hospital has tested positive for Ebola, the first case diagnosed in the United States.

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas officials said in a statement Monday that an unnamed patient was being tested for Ebola and had been placed in "strict isolation" due to the patient's symptoms and recent travel history.

Presbyterian Hospital says it's taking measures to keep its doctors, staff and patients safe.

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said that the patient arrived in Texas from Liberia earlier this month and exhibited no symptoms. The patient sought care last Friday and has been hospitalized in isolation since the weekend. Frieden said that officials don't believe there is any risk to anyone who was on the flight at that time.

Comments

  • MartelMartel Somewhere in PAPosts: 3,304 ✭✭✭✭
    This scares me a whole heck of a lot more than bringing three aid workers into the country under controlled conditions.

    But I also tend to have more confidence in our culture and medical infrastructure to control an outbreak of this disease than many do, so I'm not all that worked up.
    Intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

    I like Oliva and Quesada (including Regius) a lot.  I will smoke anything, though.
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 5,880 ✭✭✭✭✭
    How bout no more flights from Liberia for a while?
    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • raisindotraisindot BostonPosts: 1,308 ✭✭✭
    webmost:
    How bout no more flights from Liberia for a while?


    You'd have to essentially get every airport in the world to agree not to let Liberian planes land, since there'd always be a way someone could switch planes.

    Edited after Ken Light's common sense response. Stuff about quaranteeing African travelers removed.
  • Ken_LightKen_Light Posts: 3,539 ✭✭✭
    raisindot:
    webmost:
    How bout no more flights from Liberia for a while?


    You'd have to essentially get every airport in the world to agree not to let Liberian planes land, since there'd always be a way someone could switch planes.

    I'd be more in favor of requiring anyone whose flight originated from the countries affected to be quarantined and tested for Ebola at the U.S. airport where they arrived at the traveler's expense.
    Sure. You do know the gestation period can be 3 weeks, right? Or we could just f**king relax. Ebola's not that big of a threat here, or anywhere there is good medical care. The doomsday scenario is airborne Ebola, which isn't a thing right now and not likely to be a thing ever.
    ^Troll: DO NOT FEED.
  • raisindotraisindot BostonPosts: 1,308 ✭✭✭
    Ken Light:
    Sure. You do know the gestation period can be 3 weeks, right? Or we could just f**king relax. Ebola's not that big of a threat here, or anywhere there is good medical care. The doomsday scenario is airborne Ebola, which isn't a thing right now and not likely to be a thing ever.


    Really, you are right about that. From an infectious disease POV, you're far more likely to be killed by this year's version of the flu than you are by Ebola, even if some infected people do make their way here. Even in Africa, there still aren't more than several thousand deaths--which is tiny compared to the number of people that die there from Malaria. I think the scare is really more about how damned scary Ebola is, with all the blood shooting out of various orifices and whatnot at the end. If you just got it and fell quietly to death without all the nasty blood stuff we here in the U.S. would pay no more attention to it then we do to the thousands of people who die from--well, Malaria.
  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,754 ✭✭✭✭✭
    They are monitoring 14 people who came into contact with him.

  • CharlieHeisCharlieHeis South DakotaPosts: 6,017 ✭✭✭✭✭
    It's the beginning of the zombie apocalypse. I'm heading out to get more ammo...
    Ken Light MOW Badge 2014
    2015 Gang War - West Coast
  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,754 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Because the hospital did not follow protocol there are 80 people who came in contact with the carrier.

    Makes me wonder how well our troops that are in the middle of it are protected.

  • dr_frankenstein56dr_frankenstein56 Posts: 1,613 ✭✭✭
    remember the movie outbreak? LMAO

    Aj
  • Ken_LightKen_Light Posts: 3,539 ✭✭✭
    jd50ae:
    Because the hospital did not follow protocol there are 80 people who came in contact with the carrier.

    Makes me wonder how well our troops that are in the middle of it are protected.
    Came into contact figuratively, not literally. And even if any literally touched him, the odds of bodily fluids exchanging are tiny.
    ^Troll: DO NOT FEED.
  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,754 ✭✭✭✭✭
    In 2010 Obama Administration Scrapped CDC Quarantine Regulations Aimed At Ebola

    By Eric Owens, The Daily Caller

    In October 2014, the first patient on American soil infected with the Ebola virus sits in isolation in a Texas hospital, prompting calls for travel restrictions between the United States and Ebola-stricken countries.

    Meanwhile, four years ago, the administration of President Barack Obama moved with virtually no fanfare to abandon a comprehensive set of regulations which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had called essential to preventing international travelers from spreading deadly diseases inside the United States.

  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,754 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The news ain't gettin any better.

  • jd50aejd50ae West Gnawed Pencil, TNPosts: 7,754 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Health care worker at Dallas hospital tests positive for Ebola

    A health care worker at a Dallas hospital tested positive for Ebola in a preliminary test, the Texas Department of State Health Services said in a statement early Sunday.
    The health care worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, who has not been identified, provided care for Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, who died last week.
    If the preliminary diagnosis is confirmed, it would be the first known case of the disease being contracted or transmitted in the U.S.
    A statement posted on the Texas Department of State Health Service's website said "confirmatory testing will be conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta."
    “The health care worker is a heroic person who provided care to Mr. Duncan,” Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said at a press conference Sunday morning. "We expected it was possible that a second person could contract the virus. Contingency plans were put into place."
    Jenkins said he wanted to stress Ebola cannot be contracted unless one comes into contact with the bodily fluids of an Ebola victim.
    "You cannot contract it by walking by people on the streets," he said. "There is nothing about this case that changes that basic premise of science."
    Dr. Daniel Varga, of the Texas Health Resource, said the worker was in full protective gear when they provided care to Duncan during his second visit to the hospital.
    Varga said the family of the worker has "requested total privacy."
    Varga said the health care worker reported a fever Friday night as part of a self-monitoring regimen required by the CDC.
    Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said the Dallas Fire Department's rescue hazmat team has decontaminated any open areas of the health care worker's apartment complex.
    "Police are standing by to make sure no one enters that apartment complex," he said.
    Rawlings said officials have knocked on every door within a block of the apartment and have spoken with every person that came to the door. Reverse 911 calls have been made to residents within four blocks of the apartment complex and printed materials have been left at each door, he said.
    A team has decontaminated and secured the vehicle the health care worker drove to the hospital. Rawlings said hazmat units will go into the worker's apartment and clean up the interior Sunday.
    "We had this plan in place last week, so when we got this phone call, which we thought we might get, we put an action team in place," Rawlings said.
    "We knew a second case could be a reality, and we've been preparing for this possibility," said Dr. David Lakey, commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services. "We are broadening our team in Dallas and working with extreme diligence to prevent further spread."
    Health officials have interviewed the patient and are identifying any contacts or potential exposures. They said people who had contact with the health care worker after symptoms emerged will be monitored based on the nature of their interactions and the potential they were exposed to the virus.
    Ebola spreads through close contact with a symptomatic person's bodily fluids, such as blood, sweat, vomit, ***, urine, saliva or ****. Those fluids must have an entry point, like a cut or scrape, or someone touching the nose, mouth or eyes with contaminated hands, or being splashed. The World Health Organization says blood, *** and vomit are the most infectious fluids, while the virus is found in saliva mostly once patients are severely ill. The whole live virus has never been culled from sweat, WHO says.
    Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., died Wednesday in Dallas. Duncan, 42, grew up next to a leper colony in Liberia and fled years of war before later returning to his country to find it ravaged by the disease that ultimately took his life.
    Duncan arrived in Dallas in late September, realizing a long-held ambition to join relatives. He came to attend the high-school graduation of his son, who was born in a refugee camp in Ivory Coast and was brought to the U.S. as a toddler when the boy's mother successfully applied for resettlement.
    The trip was the culmination of decades of effort, friends and family members said. But when Duncan arrived in Dallas, though he showed no symptoms, he had already been exposed to Ebola. His neighbors in Liberia believe Duncan become infected when he helped a pregnant neighbor who later died from it. It was unclear if he knew about her diagnosis before traveling.
    Duncan had arrived at a friend's Dallas apartment on Sept. 20 -- less than a week after helping his sick neighbor. For the nine days before he was taken to a hospital in an ambulance, Duncan shared the apartment with several people.
    The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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