What are you reading?

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  • CalvinAndHoboCalvinAndHobo ChicagoPosts: 1,012 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The Midnight House - Alex Berenson
  • YaksterYakster La Zona State of Mind when I haven't forgotten the coffee filtersPosts: 8,054 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I'll gladly bomb you Tuesday for an Opus today.

                 Join me on the Android vHerf (from link in Evernote on Android) or iOS vHerf Link -Chris
  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 6,117 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thanks, Yak! Going to pay attention next time I roast some Rwandan
    Interesting, but I note that they spray with a neonic, imidacloprid. The stuff kills both the antestia bug and its natural predator insects and hurts honeybees. So they have to keep spraying.

    However, the persistence of these insecticides is both a bonus for pest control and a scourge for the environment. Because neonicotinoids and fipronil are difficult to metabolize, and some of their metabolites are also toxic (Simon-Delso et al., 2015), predatory insects are also killed by secondary poisoning (Walker et al., 2007). Since the insecticides eliminate natural enemies of pests, the overall IPM strategy of scale insects in citrus crops usually fails (Grafton-Cardwell et al., 2008), rendering plant protection ineffective. Due to their persistence in tissues, senescent leaves of trees that have been treated with imidacloprid fall to the ground and impair earthworms' feeding, consequently reducing leaf decomposition (Kreutzweiser et al., 2008a). As neonicotinoid and fipronil residues stay in the soil for many months (or years even) soil biota is decimated (Peck, 2009), thus impairing the recycling of nutrients that such organisms carry out in agricultural ecosystems. In turn this reduces soil fertility, which may negatively affect crop yields.

    another article:
    http://www.coffeehabitat.com/2012/01/the-potato-taint/
  • peter4jcpeter4jc Milwaukee, WIPosts: 5,939 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Under The Bleachers, by Seymour Heinie.
    "I could've had a Mi Querida!"   Nick Bardis
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 5,310 ✭✭✭✭✭
    peter4jc said:
    Under The Bleachers, by Seymour Heinie.
    The Yellow River by I.P. Freely

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 5,310 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World -- Jack Weatherford.

    Based primarily on the Secret History of the Mongols, relatively recently discovered & translated.

    Research for my book in progress.

    Did you know that once Temujen (Headlong) had united all the people who lived between felt walls, he hosted a gathering of the united hordes near God Mountain, where he was first proclaimed Chingghis Khan (Alpha-Wolf King). It was at this gathering that he first promulgated laws to govern a people who had never known any laws, only traditions. His first law was this one: no more rape. Yep... He made it a capital crime for a man to kidnap himself a bride. That put a serious crimp on your social life. Second law was no more Mongol slavery. Third, no adultery. Fourth, no more rustling. Fifth, complete religious freedom, including priests of any sort were exempt from taxes or levy. Then, a law that no one inherited their position. Instead, advancement only came by merit.

    At his lowest ebb, the guy was the slave of the slave of an enemy. His arms were tied to a yoke so that he could neither eat nor drink nor scratch his nose, nor even take a wizz. He was in a tent with a couple guards, awaiting probable execution for murdering his own brother. Escaped. But that just made things worse. Now he was lumbering across the prairie with his arms tied to a yoke, no place to hide, and horsemen chasing. But by the time he died, he was master of an empire more than twice the size of any other empire that has ever been. He did this with a people who never numbered more than a million, who had no inventions, no writing, no resources, no metal; no, not even so much as cloth. His army never exceeded a hundred thou. It would be like only a quarter of the Aztecs jumped on ponies & conquered from Alaska to Brazil.

    It's mind boggling.


    The last Mongol khan to rule GK's capital was finally deposed by the Soviets in 1920 -- seven hundred years years later!
     

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • Amos_UmwhatAmos_Umwhat West TNPosts: 4,569 ✭✭✭✭✭
    webmost said:
    Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World -- Jack Weatherford.

    Based primarily on the Secret History of the Mongols, relatively recently discovered & translated.

    Research for my book in progress.

    Did you know that once Temujen (Headlong) had united all the people who lived between felt walls, he hosted a gathering of the united hordes near God Mountain, where he was first proclaimed Chingghis Khan (Alpha-Wolf King). It was at this gathering that he first promulgated laws to govern a people who had never known any laws, only traditions. His first law was this one: no more rape. Yep... He made it a capital crime for a man to kidnap himself a bride. That put a serious crimp on your social life. Second law was no more Mongol slavery. Third, no adultery. Fourth, no more rustling. Fifth, complete religious freedom, including priests of any sort were exempt from taxes or levy. Then, a law that no one inherited their position. Instead, advancement only came by merit.

    At his lowest ebb, the guy was the slave of the slave of an enemy. His arms were tied to a yoke so that he could neither eat nor drink nor scratch his nose, nor even take a wizz. He was in a tent with a couple guards, awaiting probable execution for murdering his own brother. Escaped. But that just made things worse. Now he was lumbering across the prairie with his arms tied to a yoke, no place to hide, and horsemen chasing. But by the time he died, he was master of an empire more than twice the size of any other empire that has ever been. He did this with a people who never numbered more than a million, who had no inventions, no writing, no resources, no metal; no, not even so much as cloth. His army never exceeded a hundred thou. It would be like only a quarter of the Aztecs jumped on ponies & conquered from Alaska to Brazil.

    It's mind boggling.


    The last Mongol khan to rule GK's capital was finally deposed by the Soviets in 1920 -- seven hundred years years later!
     

    I read that a couple years ago. Impressive!  I've bought and given away a couple copies since then.  Never seem to get them back.  Hmm.
    WARNING:  The above post may contain thoughts or ideas known to the State of Caliphornia to cause seething rage, confusion, distemper, nausea, perspiration, sphincter release, or cranial implosion to persons who implicitly trust only one news source, or find themselves at either the left or right political extreme.  Proceed at your own risk.  
  • WylaffWylaff Reno, NVPosts: 4,481 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited July 15
    Recently finished The Martian by Andy Weir. That may be one of the best books ever written.

    Now I'm going through A Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss, courtesy of Fvcking Calvin, and Orcs by Stan Nicholls. Its a B grade action film in book form. It's dirty, cheap and enjoyable.
    "Cooking isn't about struggling; It's about pleasure. It's like sǝx, with a wider variety of sauces."

    I hate myself, and I don't regret any of it.

  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 6,117 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The Force of Fear: Police Stereotype Threat, Self-Legitimacy, and Support
  • GuitardedGuitarded AlbuquerquePosts: 3,150 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Origin by Dan Brown, then A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman that I highly recommend if you are or  know a curmudgeon. 
    Friends don't let good friends smoke cheap cigars.
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 5,310 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Black Rednecks and White Liberals

    Thomas Sowell
    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • VegasFrankVegasFrank North Town, VegasPosts: 674 ✭✭✭✭✭
    rereading for the 20th time Killer angels by Michael shaara. Easily the best book ever written on Gettysburg. In fact, the movie Gettysburg was based on this book.
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