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  • CalvinAndHoboCalvinAndHobo IowaPosts: 1,590 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2019
    The Millionaires - Brad Meltzer
  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 9,107 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Going to have to read this series again. I read it 35 years ago and really enjoyed it.

    Doris Lessing at 100: roving time and space

    On the centenary of the Nobel laureate’s birth, Patrick French explores her science-infused series Canopus in Argos.
    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02992-9
  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 9,107 ✭✭✭✭✭
    reading about these critters on the web this morning

    Natures Greatest Killing Machines The Harpy Eagle
  • ShawnOLShawnOL Near BostonPosts: 1,844 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Those talons make me shudder.  Jeez.
  • YaksterYakster I'm on a Buying Freeze / I sent the Coffee Filters!Posts: 12,347 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thomas Pynchon Bleeding Edge
    I'll gladly bomb you Tuesday for an Opus today.

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  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 9,107 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Haven't read that one, let us know what you think about it. Pynchon is one of my favorites. "A screaming comes across the sky. It has happened before, but there is nothing to compare it to now." one of the great opening lines.
  • YaksterYakster I'm on a Buying Freeze / I sent the Coffee Filters!Posts: 12,347 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Will do, Edward. I've enjoyed the Pynchon that I've been able to finish. I started Mason & Dixon, paired with a Crowned Heads Mason Dixon cigar, but put the book down and haven't finished it. Maybe someday.
    I'll gladly bomb you Tuesday for an Opus today.

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  • MartelMartel Somewhere in PAPosts: 3,304 ✭✭✭✭
    Pynchon is weird.  My kind of weird.

    V. and The Crying of Lot 49 are fantastic; though I've never read Gravity's Rainbow.

    Try David Foster Wallace next.  He's like Pynchon on steroids for Gen X.
    Intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

    I like Oliva and Quesada (including Regius) a lot.  I will smoke anything, though.
  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 9,107 ✭✭✭✭✭
    never too old to learn more about ants:
    https://antwiki.org/wiki/Welcome_to_AntWiki
  • First_WarriorFirst_Warrior N.C. MountainsPosts: 2,027 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Walking Shadow  by Robert Parker 1994. Spencer and Hawk do it again. I picked this up along with two boxes of books at our library's book sale. $2 a big box.
    The Native Peoples of the Americas gave tobacco to the world.
  • tabakotabako Washington StatePosts: 365 ✭✭✭
    Daring Greatly by Brene Brown, for the second time. Great book!
  • YaksterYakster I'm on a Buying Freeze / I sent the Coffee Filters!Posts: 12,347 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I'll gladly bomb you Tuesday for an Opus today.

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  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 9,107 ✭✭✭✭✭
    not yet, but as soon as it is published:

    Desert Navigator: The Journey of an Ant Hardcover – February 4, 2020

    by Rüdiger Wehner (Author)

    review here:
    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03956-9
    and from Amazon:

    "Through a lively and lucid narrative, Desert Navigator offers a firsthand look at the extraordinary navigational skills of these charismatic desert dwellers and the experiments that revealed how they strategize and solve complex problems. Wehner and his team discovered that these insect navigators use visual cues in the sky that humans are unable to see, the Earth’s magnetic field, wind direction, a step counter, and panoramic “snapshots” of landmarks, among other resources. The ants combine all of this information to steer an optimal course. At any given time during their long journey, they know exactly where to go. It is no wonder these nimble and versatile creatures have become models in the study of animal navigation.

    "Desert Navigator brings to light the marvelous capacity and complexity found in these remarkable insects and shows us how mini brains can solve mega tasks."

  • First_WarriorFirst_Warrior N.C. MountainsPosts: 2,027 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Neon Prey by John Sandford. Starting True Detectives by Jonathan Kellerman. Working my way through a box of books I got at our libraries book sale.

    The Native Peoples of the Americas gave tobacco to the world.
  • YaksterYakster I'm on a Buying Freeze / I sent the Coffee Filters!Posts: 12,347 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The Mounties: Tales of Adventure and Danger from the Early Days By Elle Andra-Warner, particularly the chapter on Cabin Fever.

    I'll gladly bomb you Tuesday for an Opus today.

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  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 9,107 ✭✭✭✭✭

    interesting read, rugged life in the RCMP for some.

  • YaksterYakster I'm on a Buying Freeze / I sent the Coffee Filters!Posts: 12,347 ✭✭✭✭✭

    802.11ax (Wi-Fi 6) white paper

    I'll gladly bomb you Tuesday for an Opus today.

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  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 6,289 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @silvermouse said:
    not yet, but as soon as it is published:
    Desert Navigator: The Journey of an Ant Hardcover – February 4, 2020

    by Rüdiger Wehner (Author)
    review here:
    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03956-9
    and from Amazon:"Through a lively and lucid narrative, Desert Navigator offers a firsthand look at the extraordinary navigational skills of these charismatic desert dwellers and the experiments that revealed how they strategize and solve complex problems. Wehner and his team discovered that these insect navigators use visual cues in the sky that humans are unable to see, the Earth’s magnetic field, wind direction, a step counter, and panoramic “snapshots” of landmarks, among other resources. The ants combine all of this information to steer an optimal course. At any given time during their long journey, they know exactly where to go. It is no wonder these nimble and versatile creatures have become models in the study of animal navigation.

    "Desert Navigator brings to light the marvelous capacity and complexity found in these remarkable insects and shows us how mini brains can solve mega tasks."

    Charismatic?

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 6,289 ✭✭✭✭✭
    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 9,107 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @webmost said:

    @silvermouse said:
    not yet, but as soon as it is published:
    Desert Navigator: The Journey of an Ant Hardcover – February 4, 2020

    by Rüdiger Wehner (Author)
    review here:
    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03956-9
    and from Amazon:"Through a lively and lucid narrative, Desert Navigator offers a firsthand look at the extraordinary navigational skills of these charismatic desert dwellers and the experiments that revealed how they strategize and solve complex problems. Wehner and his team discovered that these insect navigators use visual cues in the sky that humans are unable to see, the Earth’s magnetic field, wind direction, a step counter, and panoramic “snapshots” of landmarks, among other resources. The ants combine all of this information to steer an optimal course. At any given time during their long journey, they know exactly where to go. It is no wonder these nimble and versatile creatures have become models in the study of animal navigation.

    "Desert Navigator brings to light the marvelous capacity and complexity found in these remarkable insects and shows us how mini brains can solve mega tasks."

    Charismatic?

    Auguries of Innocence
    BY WILLIAM BLAKE
    To see a World in a Grain of Sand
    And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
    Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
    And Eternity in an hour

    the rest here:
    https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43650/auguries-of-innocence

  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 9,107 ✭✭✭✭✭

    http://openculture.com/2020/03/the-national-emergency-library-makes-nearly-1-5-million-books-free-to-read-right-now.html

    The National Emergency Library Makes 1.5 Million Books Free to Read Right Now
    in Books, Internet Archive, Libraries | March 27th, 2020 1 Comment

    The coronavirus has closed libraries in countries all around the world. Or rather, it's closed physical libraries: each week of struggle against the epidemic that goes by, more resources for books open to the public on the internet. Most recently, we have the Internet Archive's opening of the National Emergency Library, "a collection of books that supports emergency remote teaching, research activities, independent scholarship, and intellectual stimulation while universities, schools, training centers, and libraries are closed." While the "national" in the name refers to the United States, where the Internet Archive operates, anyone in the world can read its nearly 1.5 million books, immediately and without waitlists, from now "through June 30, 2020, or the end of the US national emergency, whichever is later."

    "Not to be sneezed at is the sheer pleasure of browsing through the titles," writes The New Yorker's Jill Lepore of the National Emergency Library, going on to mention such volumes as How to Succeed in Singing, Interesting Facts about How Spiders Live, and An Introduction to Kant’s Philosophy, as well as "Beckett on Proust, or Bloom on Proust, or just On Proust." A historian of America, Lepore finds herself reminded of the Council on Books in Wartime, "a collection of libraries, booksellers, and publishers, founded in 1942." On the premise that "books are useful, necessary, and indispensable," the council "picked over a thousand volumes, from Virginia Woolf’s The Years to Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep, and sold the books, around six cents a copy, to the U.S. military." By practically giving away 120 million copies of such books, the project "created a nation of readers."

    In fact, the Council on Books in Wartime created more than a nation of readers: the American "soldiers and sailors and Army nurses and anyone else in uniform" who received these books passed them along, or even left them behind in the far-flung places they'd been stationed. Haruki Murakami once told the Paris Review of his youth in Kobe, "a port city where many foreigners and sailors used to come and sell their paperbacks to the secondhand bookshops. I was poor, but I could buy paperbacks cheaply. I learned to read English from those books and that was so exciting." Seeing as Murakami himself later translated The Big Sleep into his native Japanese, it's certainly not impossible that an Armed Services Edition counted among his purchases back then.

    Now, in translations into English and other languages as well, we can all read Murakami's work — novels like Norwegian Wood and Kafka on the Shore, short-story collections like The Elephant Vanishes, and even the memoir What I Talk About When I Talk About Running — free at the National Emergency Library. The most popular books now available include everything from Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale to the Kama Sutra, Dr. Seuss's ABC to Alvin Schwartz's Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (and its two sequels), Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart to, in disconcerting first place, Sylvia Browne's End of Days: Predictions and Prophecy About the End of the World. You'll even find, in the original French as well as English translation, Albert Camus' existential epidemic novel La Peste, or The Plague, featured earlier this month here on Open Culture. And if you'd rather not confront its subject matter at this particular moment, you'll find more than enough to take your mind elsewhere. Enter the National Emergency Library here.

    Related Content:

    http://www.openculture.com/free_ebooks

    http://www.openculture.com/2018/04/enter-the-magazine-rack-the-internet-archives-collection-of-34000-digitized-magazines.html

    http://www.openculture.com/2020/03/use-your-time-in-isolation-to-learn-everything-youve-always-wanted-to.html
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  • First_WarriorFirst_Warrior N.C. MountainsPosts: 2,027 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Another novel, Rising Sun by Michael Crichton. Saw the movie now reading the book. I tried to read a electronic book, couldn't get into it. I like having a book in my hands. Different strokes for different folks.

    The Native Peoples of the Americas gave tobacco to the world.
  • ShawnOLShawnOL Near BostonPosts: 1,844 ✭✭✭✭✭

    What's a book?

  • IndustMechIndustMech ChicagolandPosts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I know, You're a big dog and I'm on the list.
    Let's eat, GrandMa.  /  Let's eat GrandMa.  --  Punctuation saves lives

    It'll be fine once the swelling goes down.

  • silvermousesilvermouse Cape CodPosts: 9,107 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That was interesting! I can't help thinking that there is more to the story though, seems improbable that medicine would discard an approach that had such allegedly glowing success.

  • IndustMechIndustMech ChicagolandPosts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Glad you enjoyed it, Edward. More research is warranted.

    I know, You're a big dog and I'm on the list.
    Let's eat, GrandMa.  /  Let's eat GrandMa.  --  Punctuation saves lives

    It'll be fine once the swelling goes down.

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