Building a humidor..

illinoisgolf99illinoisgolf99 Posts: 1,507
Hey everyone so I am a novice woodworker but my dad is pretty good at it (he has a side business so I'm assuming he is) and I would really like some advice on the materials, tools, and instructions needed to build a humidor. I was thinking about starting small but eventually I want to build a rather large cabinet humi, 5000 ct. I'm thinking

Comments

  • xmacroxmacro Posts: 3,402
    WaxingMoon is the guy to see/talk to. Other than that, a humidor's purpose is to contain humidity, which requires tight joints and good wood that can withstand the (sometimes) extreme difference between the humidity inside and the humidity outside. Spanish cedar is most often used due to its mild smell, but there are a few species of mahogany that possess similar qualities (Davidoff makes a few humidors using only mahogany).
  • illinoisgolf99:
    Hey everyone so I am a novice woodworker but my dad is pretty good at it (he has a side business so I'm assuming he is) and I would really like some advice on the materials, tools, and instructions needed to build a humidor. I was thinking about starting small but eventually I want to build a rather large cabinet humi, 5000 ct. I'm thinking
    I didnt build from scratch...but I converted an old cabient into a humi...let me know if you want some ideas. it was pretty easy and fun at the same time. i have near 500 or so in there right now but can hold around 700 if I moved some stuff around.
  • illinoisgolf99illinoisgolf99 Posts: 1,507
    txjayhawk:
    illinoisgolf99:
    Hey everyone so I am a novice woodworker but my dad is pretty good at it (he has a side business so I'm assuming he is) and I would really like some advice on the materials, tools, and instructions needed to build a humidor. I was thinking about starting small but eventually I want to build a rather large cabinet humi, 5000 ct. I'm thinking


    I didnt build from scratch...but I converted an old cabient into a humi...let me know if you want some ideas. it was pretty easy and fun at the same time. i have near 500 or so in there right now but can hold around 700 if I moved some stuff around.


    That sounds awesome, I would really appreciate some ideas on how you did that.. I want to have a cabinet someday so any info would be of great help!
  • illinoisgolf99:
    Hey everyone so I am a novice woodworker but my dad is pretty good at it (he has a side business so I'm assuming he is) and I would really like some advice on the materials, tools, and instructions needed to build a humidor. I was thinking about starting small but eventually I want to build a rather large cabinet humi, 5000 ct. I'm thinking
    I used some cedar right out of the north woods here in WI and it looks and smells great! The best part about building your own humi is you can make it out of what ever you want. I would use a wood that naturally resists mold such as cedar or at least line the inside with cedar. That will help control the humidity and keep the mold out. It also adds that great aromatic smell. Good luck and keep us posted.
  • Rob1110Rob1110 Posts: 1,455 ✭✭
    xmacro:
    WaxingMoon is the guy to see/talk to. Other than that, a humidor's purpose is to contain humidity, which requires tight joints and good wood that can withstand the (sometimes) extreme difference between the humidity inside and the humidity outside. Spanish cedar is most often used due to its mild smell, but there are a few species of mahogany that possess similar qualities (Davidoff makes a few humidors using only mahogany).
    Spanish cedar technically IS mahogany. It's not spanish and it's not a cedar. That's just the common name it's been given.
  • Rob1110Rob1110 Posts: 1,455 ✭✭
    It's not the typical mahogany commonly used in building materials here, but it is a type of mahogany. And they don't used north american cedar. Too aromatic.
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