Let's Talk Barbeque

I just got finished smoking a brisket and it turned out FANTASTIC! I cooked it "low and slow" for about 14 hours. I've been smoking meat for about 3 years and still consider myself a rookie. I've tried many different recipes and different types of wood and charcoal. I'm lovin it. I know that, in Texas, we have our way to cook brisket. How do yall do it in different parts of the country? What type of wood? How long do you smoke it at what temp? Let's hear it, BBQ Chefs! I'll post my recipe later in the thread if it takes.
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Comments

  • JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
    I don't cook it, I just eat it. IMO, there's only three places to get good BBQ - Lufkin, Texas (Lufkin BBQ), Memphis Tennessee (Rondevous BBQ, downtown), and my good buddy Leon's house (in his back yard).
  • webmostwebmost Dull-AwarePosts: 5,570 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Me the same. I just look for a BBQ place where the firewood is stacked in the yard as high as the eaves. If the cook is fat, I know I'm in the right place.

    I love dead pig.

    “It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


  • amz1301amz1301 Posts: 1,299
    Whenever I'm traveling south through NC I have to make a pit stop in Goldsboro. Smoked Eastern Carolina Whole Hog.

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  • The SniperThe Sniper Posts: 3,910
    JDH:
    I don't cook it, I just eat it. IMO, there's only three places to get good BBQ - Lufkin, Texas (Lufkin BBQ), Memphis Tennessee (Rondevous BBQ, downtown), and my good buddy Leon's house (in his back yard).
    Oh no no no no NO my friend - we gotta get you up to KC and get you a proper education! LOL Some of the best barbercue joints in the world to be had here, Arthur Bryants, Gates, Jack Stack, and Oklahoma Joe's chief among them! Maybe we need to get an exchange done thru the mail, because if there's better barbercue out there, somebody is gonna have to prove it to me!

    Now then, to answer the OP... I love smoking some meat, and usually go with brisket, ribs and pork shoulders to make pulled pork out of. To me, the secret is finding a good rub and giving it time to get into the meat before you even fire the smoker up - even more so than the wood you choose to smoke with. I tend to go with hickory because its my favorite, but every once in a while if Im in the mood for something sweet I will go with apple and a cinnamon heavy rub.

    You are definitely right on the low n slow is the way to go when making good barbercue. Gotta be indirect heat also. Some other essentials are some good cigars, drinks of your choice, and something to keep you occupied during the process! All told, if Im gonna smoke something its usually a weekend thing because by the time you figure in time in the fridge with the rub, the low and slow time involved (pork shoulders and briskets mainly, ribs get there a bit quicker), its can be anywhere from a 16-18 hour process and upwards of that depending on how much you're cooking.

    SOOOOOO worth it when the process is complete though. ;-)

  • ToombesToombes Posts: 4,489 ✭✭✭
    JDH:
    I don't cook it, I just eat it. IMO, there's only three places to get good BBQ - Lufkin, Texas (Lufkin BBQ), Memphis Tennessee (Rondevous BBQ, downtown), and my good buddy Leon's house (in his back yard).

    Holding out on me, David? Why haven't I been invited to Leon's?
  • ToombesToombes Posts: 4,489 ✭✭✭
    The Sniper:
    JDH:
    I don't cook it, I just eat it. IMO, there's only three places to get good BBQ - Lufkin, Texas (Lufkin BBQ), Memphis Tennessee (Rondevous BBQ, downtown), and my good buddy Leon's house (in his back yard).
    Oh no no no no NO my friend - we gotta get you up to KC and get you a proper education! LOL Some of the best barbercue joints in the world to be had here, Arthur Bryants, Gates, Jack Stack, and Oklahoma Joe's chief among them! Maybe we need to get an exchange done thru the mail, because if there's better barbercue out there, somebody is gonna have to prove it to me!

    Now then, to answer the OP... I love smoking some meat, and usually go with brisket, ribs and pork shoulders to make pulled pork out of. To me, the secret is finding a good rub and giving it time to get into the meat before you even fire the smoker up - even more so than the wood you choose to smoke with. I tend to go with hickory because its my favorite, but every once in a while if Im in the mood for something sweet I will go with apple and a cinnamon heavy rub.

    You are definitely right on the low n slow is the way to go when making good barbercue. Gotta be indirect heat also. Some other essentials are some good cigars, drinks of your choice, and something to keep you occupied during the process! All told, if Im gonna smoke something its usually a weekend thing because by the time you figure in time in the fridge with the rub, the low and slow time involved (pork shoulders and briskets mainly, ribs get there a bit quicker), its can be anywhere from a 16-18 hour process and upwards of that depending on how much you're cooking.

    SOOOOOO worth it when the process is complete though. ;-)


    Sniper, you're from "Misery", what do you know from BBQ?
    J/K, man. Honestly, some of the best I've had was heading over the state line when I was stationed in Memphis while I was attending A-school in the Navy.
  • The_buffalonianThe_buffalonian Posts: 987 ✭✭✭
    I have been smoking for about 5 years now and i have won 2 competition so far . For the most part i use a combination of woods; ribs ( 1 part hickory ,2 parts apple, and 1 part pecan) turkey ( 1 part apple, 2 parts hickory, 1 part grape vine) brisket ( 2 parts hickory, 2 parts pecan) etc.. Just started cold smoking fish and cheeses ,I'm still tring to get down the brine for the fish.
  • jgibvjgibv John G.Posts: 9,262 ✭✭✭✭✭
    This whole thread is making me drool....there's some finger-lickin'-good reading going on. hah

    But as far as BBQ goes - the only 3 things I've ever smoked are babyback ribs, pork loin/chops, and chicken.....we got a local joint that has great brisket but I'd love to try doing my own brisket sometime (maybe for Labor Day!??! now there's an idea!)

    But low and slow with indirect heat is definitely the way to go. Get the grates hot first, throw the meat on for a couple minutes to get a nice, quick sear then indirect heat only after that.

    I have a simple "base" BBQ rub that goes great on damn near everything....
    Base recipe:
    1/3 white sugar 1/3 brown sugar 1/6 smoked paprika 1/12 salt 1/12 ground black peppercorn
    Then depending on what type of meat we're cooking I'll add other spices accordingly.

    As far as wood goes - I usually use a combo of hickory/cherry, sometimes apple.
    Depending on what I'm cooking and how long it's going to take - I'll often throw a small pan with a bit of water next to the coals for some steam to help keep the meat from drying out.

    * I have a new address as of 3/24/18 *

  • ScramblerScrambler Posts: 746 ✭✭
    My family and friends can't wait for me to get home so I can make some pulled pork. I started out just doing one at a time, but now I usually do about 4 roasts and freeze most of it. I like to use mostly pecan wood chunks, with some oak and apple. Usually about 18-24 hours in the smoker.

    I keep saying I want to try smoking something else, but the pulled pork is just so consistently good, and we really like it, so I've stuck with it so far. It's awesome as is, but the homemade bbq sauce really finishes it off.
  • The SniperThe Sniper Posts: 3,910
    Toombes:
    Sniper, you're from "Misery", what do you know from BBQ?
    J/K, man. Honestly, some of the best I've had was heading over the state line when I was stationed in Memphis while I was attending A-school in the Navy.
    Son PLEASE!!! Ive been all over the States AND the world, and the second questions I ask when I get anywhere (after "where's my room?") is where's the best barbercue in town.

    In the best places, such as Memphis and Texas, that will get you a bunch of solid recommendations from proud locals who are eager to prove to you why their barbercue is the best in the world.

    In some places, like Scotland and most Middle Eastern nations, it usually just gets you a funny look. LOL

    Hey, wait a second... what is that? That noise! No seriously, listen! Is that... it sounds like... whispers of the First Annual BORK BBQ cookoff on the breeeze??? :-D

  • The SniperThe Sniper Posts: 3,910
    The Sniper:
    Toombes:
    Sniper, you're from "Misery", what do you know from BBQ?
    J/K, man. Honestly, some of the best I've had was heading over the state line when I was stationed in Memphis while I was attending A-school in the Navy.
    Son PLEASE!!! Ive been all over the States AND the world, and the second questions I ask when I get anywhere (after "where's my room?") is where's the best barbercue in town.

    In the best places, such as Memphis and Texas, that will get you a bunch of solid recommendations from proud locals who are eager to prove to you why their barbercue is the best in the world.

    In some places, like Scotland and most Middle Eastern nations, it usually just gets you a funny look. LOL

    Hey, wait a second... what is that? That noise! No seriously, listen! Is that... it sounds like... whispers of the First Annual BORK BBQ cookoff on the breeeze??? :-D

    Just though of something actually - when Im talking barbercue with somebody, if I say Im from "Misery" they just go on with the conversation. But if I tell them Im from KANSAS CITY instead, NOW Ive got their attention. LOL Funny how that works.

  • The SniperThe Sniper Posts: 3,910
    Scrambler:
    My family and friends can't wait for me to get home so I can make some pulled pork. I started out just doing one at a time, but now I usually do about 4 roasts and freeze most of it. I like to use mostly pecan wood chunks, with some oak and apple. Usually about 18-24 hours in the smoker.

    I keep saying I want to try smoking something else, but the pulled pork is just so consistently good, and we really like it, so I've stuck with it so far. It's awesome as is, but the homemade bbq sauce really finishes it off.
    Hey brother, first off thanks for your service - you ARE appreciated!!!

    Now then, since you're doing multiple pieces of meat at a time, try this when you get back... instead of throwing one of the pork shoulders on the grill, use that space for a rack of ribs (I like using St Louis style pork ribs because I like em meaty, but to each their own) on that spot in the grill grate instead. Same temp as a pork shoulder, but the ribs will finish hours before the pork shoulders are done. When the meat starts to pull back from the ends of the bone, you will know its time to pull em.

    Simplicity itself since you're already there, and this way everybody gets some rib bones to munch on while they're waiting on the pulled pork to get done. Give it a shot when you get home, and let us know how it works out for ya! :-)

  • The SniperThe Sniper Posts: 3,910
    jgibv:
    But as far as BBQ goes - the only 3 things I've ever smoked are babyback ribs, pork loin/chops, and chicken.....we got a local joint that has great brisket but I'd love to try doing my own brisket sometime (maybe for Labor Day!??! now there's an idea!)

    Man, I dont know what the deal is, but Ive screwed it up EVERY SINGLE TIME Ive ever tried smoking chicken!!! Whole chickens, breasts, leg quarters, doesnt seem to matter - no matter what I do, they always come out so rubbery you can LITERALLY bounce them like a basketball. LOL

    That being said, my next try-it-out is gonna be a turkey I think. LOOOOOOVE me some smoked turkey, but have never done one myself. Ive never brined anything actually, and am excited to try it out.

    Still, you can best believe I will have something in the fridge ready to go for dinner in case the turkey goes the way the chicken does and comes out doing a basketball with drumsticks impression. LOL

  • prosspross Posts: 874 ✭✭✭
    My specialty is beef ribs of the Flinstone sort. Salt, rub and brown sugar, let sit in fridge overnight to break down the meat, smoke at 200-250 until 1 inch of bone becomes exposed. Time depends on size of ribs. I use apple for the smoke. Dying to try brisket.
  • jgibvjgibv John G.Posts: 9,262 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The Sniper:
    jgibv:
    But as far as BBQ goes - the only 3 things I've ever smoked are babyback ribs, pork loin/chops, and chicken.....we got a local joint that has great brisket but I'd love to try doing my own brisket sometime (maybe for Labor Day!??! now there's an idea!)

    Man, I dont know what the deal is, but Ive screwed it up EVERY SINGLE TIME Ive ever tried smoking chicken!!! Whole chickens, breasts, leg quarters, doesnt seem to matter - no matter what I do, they always come out so rubbery you can LITERALLY bounce them like a basketball. LOL

    That being said, my next try-it-out is gonna be a turkey I think. LOOOOOOVE me some smoked turkey, but have never done one myself. Ive never brined anything actually, and am excited to try it out.

    Still, you can best believe I will have something in the fridge ready to go for dinner in case the turkey goes the way the chicken does and comes out doing a basketball with drumsticks impression. LOL

    Weird....I've never had an issue when I do dry-rub chicken - pieces or whole chicken always come out fine for me. What temperature are you cooking it at?? 275ish seems to work well for me.
    Also, where do you get your meat from?

    Because the only 2 things I can think of off the top of my head are
    1) it's not cooked enough
    or 2) maybe it's the meat itself. I say this because my fiance's parents raise chickens and there's a noticeable taste & texture difference between grilling their birds and store-bought chicken meat. If we're cooking the store-bought meat any other way, I never notice the difference....but on the grill - the difference between the two is like night and day.

    I've never tried turkey, but my fiance really wants to --- so I'll be curious to know how it turns out.

    * I have a new address as of 3/24/18 *

  • JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
    The Sniper:
    JDH:
    I don't cook it, I just eat it. IMO, there's only three places to get good BBQ - Lufkin, Texas (Lufkin BBQ), Memphis Tennessee (Rondevous BBQ, downtown), and my good buddy Leon's house (in his back yard).
    Oh no no no no NO my friend - we gotta get you up to KC and get you a proper education! LOL Some of the best barbercue joints in the world to be had here, Arthur Bryants, Gates, Jack Stack, and Oklahoma Joe's chief among them! Maybe we need to get an exchange done thru the mail, because if there's better barbercue out there, somebody is gonna have to prove it to me!

    Now then, to answer the OP... I love smoking some meat, and usually go with brisket, ribs and pork shoulders to make pulled pork out of. To me, the secret is finding a good rub and giving it time to get into the meat before you even fire the smoker up - even more so than the wood you choose to smoke with. I tend to go with hickory because its my favorite, but every once in a while if Im in the mood for something sweet I will go with apple and a cinnamon heavy rub.

    You are definitely right on the low n slow is the way to go when making good barbercue. Gotta be indirect heat also. Some other essentials are some good cigars, drinks of your choice, and something to keep you occupied during the process! All told, if Im gonna smoke something its usually a weekend thing because by the time you figure in time in the fridge with the rub, the low and slow time involved (pork shoulders and briskets mainly, ribs get there a bit quicker), its can be anywhere from a 16-18 hour process and upwards of that depending on how much you're cooking.

    SOOOOOO worth it when the process is complete though. ;-)

    I heard about KC - it's somewhere out on the Great Prarie isn't it? You're right, I've not had any KC BBQ, but that stuff they burn in Memphis is just a big ole slice of slow cooked heaven. The first time we ate at the Rondevous, I ordered a full rack of ribs, and the wife thought I had actually inhaled them. She said she's never seen a plate of bare bones grow so quick. Look 'em up online.
  • JDHJDH Posts: 2,107
    Toombes:
    JDH:
    I don't cook it, I just eat it. IMO, there's only three places to get good BBQ - Lufkin, Texas (Lufkin BBQ), Memphis Tennessee (Rondevous BBQ, downtown), and my good buddy Leon's house (in his back yard).

    Holding out on me, David? Why haven't I been invited to Leon's?
    No hold out there, Daniel. Leon's my bud & that guy makes some damn fine ribs....he's been doin it every year for at least 30 years, & he's doin something seriously right. I'll give you a shout out the next time he's burnin meat.
  • ScramblerScrambler Posts: 746 ✭✭
    The Sniper:
    Hey brother, first off thanks for your service - you ARE appreciated!!!

    Now then, since you're doing multiple pieces of meat at a time, try this when you get back... instead of throwing one of the pork shoulders on the grill, use that space for a rack of ribs (I like using St Louis style pork ribs because I like em meaty, but to each their own) on that spot in the grill grate instead. Same temp as a pork shoulder, but the ribs will finish hours before the pork shoulders are done. When the meat starts to pull back from the ends of the bone, you will know its time to pull em.

    Simplicity itself since you're already there, and this way everybody gets some rib bones to munch on while they're waiting on the pulled pork to get done. Give it a shot when you get home, and let us know how it works out for ya! :-)

    Thanks, Sniper. This is my first deployment. Hasn't been bad, and just a few short weeks now and I'll be back stateside.

    And that definitely sounds like a plan. I love St Louis style ribs, so I'll try that as soon as I get a chance.
  • jthanatosjthanatos Posts: 1,570 ✭✭
    Now, I have never done it myself, but my father does rack of lamb in the smoker, and it may be the greatest thing ever. When my wife and I get a house, the smoker is one of our first purchases.
  • jsnakejsnake Kansas CityPosts: 5,796 ✭✭✭✭✭
    BBQ in Texas - don't make me laugh

    Memphis BBQ - I think I just threw up a little

    East Coast - Puhhhhhhlease

    Everyone knows that the only true BBQ comes from Kansas City. Everything else is just some meat with sauce on it.

    Had to. My father-in-law got one of those egg type grills and we spent a weekend smoking everything. I fell in love. I want one so bad but I am not about to drop $900 for a smoker. Great thing about KC is you can almost always smell the delicious aroma of smoking meat wherever you go. Many different options all around the metro. I have tried Carolina, Memphis, Texas, and all other BBQ and just don't love it like I do my KC BBQ.

    My neighbor smokes and usually puts on enough meat for an army. 6 chickens, 3 briskets, 8 turkey legs and sometimes more is the norm. I must get a smoker but not sure if I want to go charcoal, wood, propane.

    What about sauces? What do you all like to use that you buy in a bottle or do you make your own?
  • reggie713reggie713 Posts: 2,521 ✭✭✭✭
    ive been smokin for about 3 years, one of my favs is smokin a whole butt, having sammiches, with a lil homemade carolina style sauce and slaw, and the next day makin a big ol pot of chilli with the left overs! its sooo good! i got a turkey in the fridge getting ready to be brined for this weekend, my wifes fav, but the time in the smoker is priceless, crack a brew light a cigar, just sit and relax
  • StreaterStreater Posts: 293
    The Sniper:
    jgibv:
    But as far as BBQ goes - the only 3 things I've ever smoked are babyback ribs, pork loin/chops, and chicken.....we got a local joint that has great brisket but I'd love to try doing my own brisket sometime (maybe for Labor Day!??! now there's an idea!)

    Man, I dont know what the deal is, but Ive screwed it up EVERY SINGLE TIME Ive ever tried smoking chicken!!! Whole chickens, breasts, leg quarters, doesnt seem to matter - no matter what I do, they always come out so rubbery you can LITERALLY bounce them like a basketball. LOL

    That being said, my next try-it-out is gonna be a turkey I think. LOOOOOOVE me some smoked turkey, but have never done one myself. Ive never brined anything actually, and am excited to try it out.

    Still, you can best believe I will have something in the fridge ready to go for dinner in case the turkey goes the way the chicken does and comes out doing a basketball with drumsticks impression. LOL

    You need to braise the chicken before you cook it. Also, turn the heat up, and cook it to 165...

    As far as brisket goes, I start by slathering a good coating of yellow mustard on the meat. Then, I apply my rub which consists of Garlic Salt, Garlic Salt, Garlic Salt, Table Pepper, Paprika, a VERY TINY BIT of Dark Brown Sugar, and a little Garlic Salt. I will add a minute amount of Cayenne Pepper if I'm out at the hunting camp. Then it rests either in the fridge overnight, or if I'm an hour from putting it on the smoker, 1 hour on the counter to come to room temp.

    I put it on the smoker at 225 degrees, and after 2 hours, or 105 degrees, I start basting it. We call it, "mopping" as we use a mop to apply the baste. The baste consists of Apple Cider Vinegar, Lime Juice, Worcestershire Sauce, Minced Garlic, and Garlic Salt. If I'm cookin for women, I will replace the lime juice with orange juice. Don't ask me why they like it better. I have no clue, but I have done 4 experiments using each, and the women like the orange juice mop better than the lime. Men like the lime better. I can't tell the difference, but I have documented results in a controlled environment. I mop every hour until you wrap in foil. This is anywhere from 3-5 hours depending on the outside temp. At this point, you can CHEAT, and put it in a roasting pan, drop it in the oven at 200 degrees and go to bed. I admit that I do this sometimes.

    I will continue to mop every 2 hours after the foil is applied, but if you keep the temp 200-225, the internal juices will keep it moist and won't burn it to the foil. When the internal temp gets to 190, I take it off still wrapped in the foil, wrap it in a beach towel and put it in an ice chest for 2-3 hours. This step is important as it allows the meat to still cook from the internal juices and also gives the meat time to rest so you don't end up with a bunch of chopped beef. You can't slice it right off the smoker. It tends to have the consistency of pot roast if it doesn't have time to rest. It needs to rest for AT LEAST an hour.

    I only use oak and pecan for my brisket. I use apple and a small amount of mesquite for pork, and hickory and cherry for chicken. With all the wood, I use charcoal. I like Kingsford, but sometimes I use lump charcoal. It just sparks and pops a lot.
  • jgibvjgibv John G.Posts: 9,262 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Streater:
    You need to braise the chicken before you cook it. Also, turn the heat DOWN, and cook it LONGER...
    Just curious - what temperature and cook time do you, personally, do for a:
    1) whole chicken
    2) pieces


    Also - thank you for the step-by-step brisket recipe. YUM!!!! Sounds delicious, I'll be referring to your post when I give it a whirl.

    * I have a new address as of 3/24/18 *

  • ToombesToombes Posts: 4,489 ✭✭✭
    Gentlemen, I have decided to no longer read this post as I cannot afford the road trip to KC for some Q...
  • amz1301amz1301 Posts: 1,299
    The Sniper:
    Man, I dont know what the deal is, but Ive screwed it up EVERY SINGLE TIME Ive ever tried smoking chicken!!! Whole chickens, breasts, leg quarters, doesnt seem to matter - no matter what I do, they always come out so rubbery you can LITERALLY bounce them like a basketball. LOL
    Could be the brand of chicken. I only like Perdue for some reason.
  • The_buffalonianThe_buffalonian Posts: 987 ✭✭✭
    jgibv:
    Streater:
    You need to braise the chicken before you cook it. Also, turn the heat DOWN, and cook it LONGER...
    Just curious - what temperature and cook time do you, personally, do for a:
    1) whole chicken
    2) pieces


    Also - thank you for the step-by-step brisket recipe. YUM!!!! Sounds delicious, I'll be referring to your post when I give it a whirl.
    I brine(1 cup of salt, 1 cup of brown sugar, 4 tbls of black pepper,2 tbls of ground mustard) for a 4 lb bird for 24hrs, rise off brine and season the skin with spices of your choice , I use hickory and cherry wood , at 250-275 its about a half hour per pound(crispy skin). I like to do mine at 185 and its about 2 hrs per pound and just peel of the skin after cooking
  • ug danug dan Posts: 375
    I love smoking meats. My favorite is pork butts for pulled pork sandwhiches. I have an extra large Big Green Egg that is awesome!
  • fla-gypsyfla-gypsy Posts: 3,024 ✭✭
    Every true BBQ connoisseur knows that good BBQ abounds south of the MD line. We have good Q down here too. Been smoking savory meats for a few years myself.
  • rzamanrzaman Posts: 2,650 ✭✭✭
    My favourite BBQs are - Southern style pork ribs, Persian chicken Jujeh kabob, Turkish Adana Kebab, Korean beef BBQ and South Asian chicken Tandori kabob.
  • StreaterStreater Posts: 293
    The buffalonian:
    jgibv:
    Streater:
    You need to braise the chicken before you cook it. Also, turn the heat DOWN, and cook it LONGER...
    Just curious - what temperature and cook time do you, personally, do for a:
    1) whole chicken
    2) pieces


    Also - thank you for the step-by-step brisket recipe. YUM!!!! Sounds delicious, I'll be referring to your post when I give it a whirl.
    I brine(1 cup of salt, 1 cup of brown sugar, 4 tbls of black pepper,2 tbls of ground mustard) for a 4 lb bird for 24hrs, rise off brine and season the skin with spices of your choice , I use hickory and cherry wood , at 250-275 its about a half hour per pound(crispy skin). I like to do mine at 185 and its about 2 hrs per pound and just peel of the skin after cooking
    BRINE!. Not Braise. My mistake. I use salt, black pepper and chopped garlic for 6-8 hours. Yours sounds much better Buffalonian. I'm always afraid that it'll make the chicken too salty if I let it brine more than 8 hours. I'll have to try it your way...

    After I brine it and rinse, I like to inject butter under the skin and sometimes stick some sliced jalapenos under the skin for a little zip. I season it with garlic salt and lemon pepper. I smoke it whole at 300-350 till the internal temp is 165. Chicken likes higher heat from what I've heard. That might be where you went wrong. ***I edited my earlier post. I gave a wrong suggestion regarding the temp of the smoker for chicken. My apologies. Must have been thinking about ribs. Not really sure why I did that.
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