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cigar storage

I would like to know if having my cigar collection in a tupperdor long term would my cigars be getting aged properly and if it would have any affect on them meaning mold.

Comments

  • ExpendableYouthExpendableYouth the lurkerPosts: 2,105 ✭✭✭✭✭
    They would age slower due to the lack of air flow, at least that is my understanding. Tupperdor's have to be monitored kind of closely since they create an almost perfect seal and do not allow humidity to escape or be absorbed like wood would allow. You need to burp them ever couple of days, and maybe everyday depending on your climate. A coolidor allows you more space for beads or cat littler to absorb the excess humidity, but you should still monitor it daily. I would suggest getting a coolidor or humidor for long term storage since it would be easier to monitor and keep at optimal temp/rh. I use a tupperdor for my runoff from over ordering, but I just broke down and bought a new humidor. You can find relatively cheap humidors online, just ask yourself what you realistically are going to store as far as quantity and keep in mind that if it says it will hold 150 and you like gordos it can be closer to 90. If you are just starting out and are still trying to determine if this hobby is something your interested in pursuing than a tupperdo should suit you fine for now. I would also suggest you use humidity beads or gel and cigar juice since it will minimize the chance of mold and help to regulate the rh in your box. Keep in mind to regularly burp you tupperdor and to get a hydrometer and temperature gauge, I prefer electronic to analog, to get a good idea of what is going on.
  • 716SMOKE716SMOKE Posts: 22
    Expendable youth, nice reply! It has recently been recommended to me that a Coolidor is the way to go for long term storage, keeping in mind appropriate monitoring. I have two 150 capacity humidors, but they've reached full capacity, over flow I've been keeping in a tupperdor.
  • USSCV66USSCV66 Posts: 3
    I've been experiencing more of my cigars burning unevenly.  The only thing that I can think of is that the humidity, as it's absorbed by the cigar, settles to the bottom or lowest point in the cigar; causing the lower portion of the cigar to be moister and ultimately burn slower than the top.  Has anyone experienced this and is the remedy, turning my cigars like a steak on the grill?
  • avengethisavengethis Sorry, I ate all your bacon!Posts: 5,666 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I go through and move my sticks around usually twice a year.  I find that burn issues can be humidity, it can also be if there is a lot of ligero or if you get a nice stem in a stick.  I don't think there could really be much of a difference in a cigar from top to bottom like you are thinking however I could be wrong.
    Team O'Donnell FTW!

    "I've got a great cigar collection - it's actually not a collection, because that would imply I wasn't going to smoke ever last one of 'em." - Ron White
  • peter4jcpeter4jc Milwaukee, WIPosts: 13,246 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I go through and move my sticks around usually twice a year.  I find that burn issues can be humidity, it can also be if there is a lot of ligero or if you get a nice stem in a stick.  I don't think there could really be much of a difference in a cigar from top to bottom like you are thinking however I could be wrong.
    I'd agree with Brad, that turning is unnecessary. 

    In an empty humidor, the moisture rises, then settles out, and balances pretty evenly.  I doubt that the small confines of a cigar wrapper, especially since it's full of filler, would have any difference in moisture from top to bottom.  Any burn issues would more likely come from being lit poorly or from poor construction.
    "I could've had a Mi Querida!"   Nick Bardis
  • variant2variant2 <---- Don't Believe Him!Posts: 880 ✭✭✭✭
    I'm pretty sure that humid air will at the higher point instead of the bottom of your humidor. I have 2 hygros in one of my humidors and the top one always reads higher.

    Nonetheless, if you believe that you have uneven humidity levels in your humidor, depending on the size, there are two things you can try:

    1. Small humidors: you can simply rotate your stock around.

    2. Larger humidors: you can install a small fan to circulate the air.


    Cнeerѕ! Moтнerғυcĸer
  • avengethisavengethis Sorry, I ate all your bacon!Posts: 5,666 ✭✭✭✭✭
    USSCV66 said:
    I've been experiencing more of my cigars burning unevenly.  The only thing that I can think of is that the humidity, as it's absorbed by the cigar, settles to the bottom or lowest point in the cigar; causing the lower portion of the cigar to be moister and ultimately burn slower than the top.  Has anyone experienced this and is the remedy, turning my cigars like a steak on the grill?
    I guess I should ask...what do you normally keep your rh at?  Where are you located?
    Team O'Donnell FTW!

    "I've got a great cigar collection - it's actually not a collection, because that would imply I wasn't going to smoke ever last one of 'em." - Ron White
  • Lee.mcglynnLee.mcglynn HahahahaaaaaPosts: 5,960 ✭✭✭✭
    First off I use boveda packs yeah yeah yeah but they work and maintain rh in any container plastic or wood! Second your really think too much into it if you really believe that half of your smoke is wetter then the other. Third imo burn issues are caused by over humidifiing so you might want to make sure what your rh really is.
    Money can't buy taste
  • ExpendableYouthExpendableYouth the lurkerPosts: 2,105 ✭✭✭✭✭
    It sounds like construction issues. I've had over humidification in my tupperdor before, and that makes the whole cigar difficult to smoke. I've had to puff a lot to dry out the tabacco and it makes it bitter and a fight to keep it lit. Try toasting the foot evenly and ensuring you are getting a uniform burn from the start. Also smoke a little slower than you normally would and take even puffs and regular intervals. This could narrow down where the issue is coming from. Just my two cents.
  • jsnakejsnake Kansas CityPosts: 5,949 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The advice I always see guys giving is to pop the tops on the tupperdor every couple days to let everything breathe. Rotating sticks is a good idea too. Maybe not in a small tupperdor but when you get into bigger capacity rotate those sticks. 
  • HrycajHrycaj Posts: 62 ✭✭
    edited February 2016
    Worth it? Big enough as a beginner? Online calls it- 19.7 x 13.7 x 12 inches. Too tight with the marine seal?
  • WylaffWylaff < < < HipsterPosts: 5,167 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yes, and no.
    "Cooking isn't about struggling; It's about pleasure. It's like sǝx, with a wider variety of sauces."

    At any given time the urge to sing "In The Jungle" is just a whim away... A whim away... A whim away...
  • kswildcatkswildcat Posts: 1,490 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I have a smaller igloo I payed like $15 for and a larger Coleman I payed like $57. Both bought from wally world and seem to work well. I know some here have either of the 2 or both as well.
  • onestrangeoneonestrangeone Austin, TxPosts: 2,441 ✭✭✭✭✭
     IMO an airtight seal is a good thing, it promotes stability. It's likely that you will be in it at least once a month, this is more than enough fresh air circulation. Weather conditions and temperature changes will have an effect on the RH even in a sealed container, so  with a coolidor, tupidor or any airtight container you should use a two way humidifier, (silica beads, KL or Boveda) these will compensate for the changes and your smokes will be happy, happy, happy!   
  • CAcigarguy007CAcigarguy007 Posts: 1,592 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Zero problems with tupperador. Haven't had a wood humidor in years. Only used one when I first got into cigars. Been using a Iris Weathertight container (like this: http://www.containerstore.com/s/storage/storage-boxes/clear-weathertight-totes/12d?productId=10026213 ) for years with two large 65% boveda packs and it holds steady at 65%- 69% year round and my cigars smoke fabulous. Easiest set up I ever had. Cigars may not age quite as quickly but they maintain their oils and flavor just fine over the years and as your collection grows this may be a added benefit/bonus. 
  • CAcigarguy007CAcigarguy007 Posts: 1,592 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I'm also in the "rotating is not necessary" camp. Humidity is relative to the environment and though you may have slight differences/readings from opening/measuring it will even out once things settle. It also increases the chances of damaging your cigars even if you keep them in cello as many of us do. Avoiding any unnecessary handling is prudent. 
  • Lee.mcglynnLee.mcglynn HahahahaaaaaPosts: 5,960 ✭✭✭✭
    Also a small fan will help with humidity distribution. Just a small one on a timer I have it go on for 15min 4 times a day and well can't complain
    Money can't buy taste
  • HrycajHrycaj Posts: 62 ✭✭
    Got a cooler today...Preferences on shelving? Where could I get empty cigar boxes? It's just the smaller 28 quart or
    liter or whatever measurement (so that it stays full enough to stay consistent rh)
  • jlmartajlmarta 50 miles from ParadisePosts: 7,881 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Hrycaj said:
    Got a cooler today...Preferences on shelving? Where could I get empty cigar boxes? It's just the smaller 28 quart or
    liter or whatever measurement (so that it stays full enough to stay consistent rh)
    Do a search on eBay for wooden cigar boxes.... B)
  • WaterNerdWaterNerd Southern CaliforniaPosts: 3,091 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @Hrycaj I just scored a bunch of wood cigar boxes from a member here on the forum. They work perfect in a cooler to keep everything nice and organized :)

    Link
    Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt
    — Abraham Lincoln


  • HrycajHrycaj Posts: 62 ✭✭
    Never heard of those 5 finger bags. Thanks for the heads up! You keep the 5 finger bags unzipped too like the gallons? Is plastic plastic as far as bag type? I have access to a heat sealer so was thinking I would make my own divided bags out of thinner sandwich bags...
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